39 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Union Representation Votes and Job Satisfaction

Description: Why do employees vote for or against union representation? A survey of the scholarly literature and an investigation of National Labor Relations Board sponsored elections among Southern industrial workers were conducted to help answer this question. Four hypotheses were proposed to reveal the most important factors. No universally applicable laws were developed by the dissertation study. Although the hypotheses were supported, the response rate was very low in the field research study of sensitive issues. The field research did provide additional empirical evidence to support most of the previous research studies concerning union representation election voting behavior.
Date: August 1980
Creator: Baldwin, Lee Elliott
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Analysis of Teacher Militancy and Its Impact on the National Education Association and the American Federation of Teachers

Description: The present study has several purposes in mind. First, the increasing teacher militancy from January, 1940, to July, 1968, will be delineated. Second, possible causes of increasing militancy since World War II will be evaluated. Special emphasis will be given to the current period of teacher strikes. Third, the historical roles of the NEA and AFT, with emphasis on their respective positions with respect to the improvement of teacher welfare, will be surveyed. Fourth, the impact of increasing teacher militancy on the NEA and AFT, will be investigated.
Date: January 1970
Creator: Shamblin, Joe D.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Leadership Styles: Present and Future Trends

Description: The last eighty years have seen some dramatic changes occurring in the business community, particularly in the area of management leadership. Most significant in this regard is the increased emphasis upon human relations in management. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects that this trend has had on methods of management currently practiced. This is done by means of a survey of supervisors and subordinates conducted in the Dallas metroplex area. The results of this survey suggest that a good supervisor is neither authoritarian nor permissive per se, but rather he is one who recognizes and responds to the variables which determine whether the human relations management approach or the more rigid scientific approach will best suit his particular leadership situation.
Date: December 1979
Creator: Rawlings, Patty
Partner: UNT Libraries

An investigation of the relationships between job characteristics, satisfaction, and team commitment as influenced by organization-based self-esteem within a team-based environment

Description: Team-based management is a popular contemporary method of redesigning jobs in order to more effectively utilize the human potential of employees. The use of such management techniques should result in increased satisfaction and team commitment; however, many research studies have failed to demonstrate increases in affective outcomes on the part of the employee. The research question examined in this study is, "What specific job dimensions and situational factors result in higher levels of satisfaction and team commitment?" The Job Characteristics Model (Hackman & Oldham, 1975) provided a basis for this study. The model was designed for individual contributors and has not been extensively used in team research. As expected it was found that within a team-based environment higher levels of the five core job dimensions of skill variety, task identity, task significance, autonomy, and job feedback were associated with increased satisfaction and team commitment. Organization-based self-esteem was found to mediate the relationship between the five core job dimensions and the affective outcome variables. Contrary to expectations, however, it was found that consultative team members experienced higher levels of satisfaction and commitment than substantive team members. In addition, consultative team members reported higher levels of two core job dimensions, skill variety and task significance, and on the overall Job Diagnostic Survey than did substantive team members. These findings have significant implications for companies undergoing organizational redesign and questions whether those companies should implement advanced levels of employee involvement activities if the organizational goal is to increase satisfaction and commitment. The study employed a survey research design in which data was collected using a self-report questionnaire. A heterogeneous sample of 183 team members participating in either a consultative and substantive team from four different companies in nine locations provided the data for this field survey. Multivariate analyses, including hierarchial set regression, were ...
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: August 2000
Creator: Abbott, John B.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Differences in Work Values Perceptions of Diverse Demographic Groups

Description: The purpose of the study was to determine what differences in work attitudes, if any, exist in the American workforce within various demographic groups, and what implications such differences have for managers. Age, level of education, college major, race, sex, pay method, skill level and job classification were chosen to be the independent variables. Current literature indicates that a shift in values has influenced many areas in society in the last two decades. This study was an attempt to determine if the work values of the general population are related to the above eight independent variables.
Date: August 1984
Creator: Baldwin, Janice Lee
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Construct of Organization for Higher Education

Description: In developing a construct of organization for higher education, this study is designed to describe the historical development of college and university organizational structures and supporting theory, to describe higher education's contemporary organizational structures and supporting theory, to determine from writings on complex organizations their applications to organizational structures and supporting theory in higher education, to synthesize from the search of literature a consistent theory of organizational structures and supporting theory for higher education institutions, and to develop a higher education organizational construct composed primarily of principles of organizational structure. This study explores theory of organization as it pertains to colleges and universities. Heuristically conceived, the study is reflective and developmental in nature.
Date: August 1974
Creator: Hull, Don M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Investigation of the Differential in Consumer Behavior of the Working Woman as Opposed to the Non-Working Woman, and the Resulting Impact on the Performance of Marketing Functions and Institutions

Description: The purpose of this research is to investigate the differentials and commonalties in the consumer behavior and attitudes of the working woman as opposed to the non-working woman. The findings of the research are analyzed to determine their impact on the performance of marketing institutions and functions. The major hypothesis tested in this research is: Working women comprise a distinct market segment, which differs in kind from the non-working woman. Both primary and secondary data are used for this study. The principal sources of secondary data are the 1960 and 1970 U.S. Government Census Tracts of the Census of Population. The primary data was obtained from a questionnaire, sent to 1,093 women residing in specific Census Tracts within the Dallas, Texas Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. The Tracts were selected by geographical dispersion and statistically tolerable limits for female labor force participation and median family income. This criteria insured the inclusion of women for whom the value of work was either high or low. The analysis of the data revealed that working women may be segmented into a distinct consumer market. Demographic characteristics related to consumer behavior were found to be (in order of importance) Age, Income, Education, Age of Children at Home, and Marital Status. The working woman is more likely to be younger, unmarried, have fewer, if any, children at home, and have a family income of less than $10,000 dollars, than her nonworking counterpart. Major differentials, related to work status were found in the areas of Food Shopping, Personal Clothing Shopping, Use of Leisure Time, Newspaper Readership and Television Viewing, Frequency of Eating Out, Use of Vending Machines, Use of Mail Order Catalogs, Attitude Toward and Use of Discount Houses, Opinion and Use of Advertising and Its Portrayal of Women, and Use and Knowledge of Credit. The use ...
Date: May 1974
Creator: McCall, Suzanne H.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study of Selected Savings and Loan Clubs and Their Marketing Functions, with Implications of the Club Concept for the Savings and Loan Industry and for Manufacturers and Middlemen of Certain Consumer Goods and Services

Description: This study investigates the use of the consumer buying club concept in the savings and loan industry. The major purposes of the study were to determine the effectiveness of savings and loan clubs as promotional tools and to reveal some broader marketing implications of the savings and loan club concept. The study's findings provided support for the following hypotheses: I. If savings and loan clubs were independent business operations in the channels of distribution for the goods and services they offer members, these clubs, based upon the marketing functions they perform, would be classified as two or more different types of distinct marketing institutions. II. Rather than being temporary promotional tools, savings and loan clubs are permanent organizational units of some savings and loan associations. III. Savings and loan clubs offer access to a large market for manufacturers and middlemen of certain goods and services. Primary data on the operations and activities of savings and loan clubs were collected in semi-structured interviews with executives of ten clubs that are believed to represent every type of club program existing in the fall of 1973. A mail survey of selected regulatory authorities provided information about the present and future regulatory environment in which clubs operate. Analyses of the data suggest that there are qualitative and quantitative differences in club programs based upon the geographic scope of a club's operation and the size of the sponsoring savings and loan association; however, the club concept appears to be an effective and relatively inexpensive promotional tool when matters of club objectives and design are carefully considered. The regulatory environment for club operations may be described as a passive one, and the findings indicate that this environment will not change in the near future. Savings and loan clubs are consumer-oriented and service-oriented promotional tools indicative of ...
Date: August 1974
Creator: Detweiler, Priscilla
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Evaluation of Backpropagation Neural Network Modeling as an Alternative Methodology for Criterion Validation of Employee Selection Testing

Description: Employee selection research identifies and makes use of associations between individual differences, such as those measured by psychological testing, and individual differences in job performance. Artificial neural networks are computer simulations of biological nerve systems that can be used to model unspecified relationships between sets of numbers. Thirty-five neural networks were trained to estimate normalized annual revenue produced by telephone sales agents based on personality and biographic predictors using concurrent validation data (N=1085). Accuracy of the neural estimates was compared to OLS regression and a proprietary nonlinear model used by the participating company to select agents.
Date: August 1995
Creator: Scarborough, David J. (David James)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Organizational Commitment: A Cross-National Comparison of Arab and Non-Arab Employees in Saudi Petrochemical Companies

Description: Individuals with different personal demographics and job-based factors have different attitudes and behaviors, which can influence their levels of commitment to their organizations. These differences in organizational commitment increase as their cultural backgrounds differ significantly. Personal demographics and job-related factors are reliable predictors of employees' commitment to their employing organizations. The purpose of this study was to empirically investigate if there is a difference in the level of employees' commitment to Saudi petrochemical companies on the basis of differences in their personal demographics and job-related factors.
Date: May 1998
Creator: Al-Kahtany, Abdulwahab Said
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Impact of Student-Faculty Informal Interpersonal Relationships on Intellectual and Personal Development in the University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria

Description: This study was conducted to determine the impact of student-faculty informal interpersonal relationships on the intellectual development and personal achievement of students attending the University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria. Specifically, the work of Pascarella and Terenzini was generalized with respect to the positive influence of student-faculty interactions on academic outcomes. Additionally, the work of Pascarella and Terenzini was extended with a sample of students at the University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria. Eight hundred subjects were selected for the study; 621 subjects responded. One survey instrument was used. Frequencies and multiple regression analyses were used. A series of studies on student-faculty interaction has shown a significant relationship between student-faculty informal contact and student outcomes. A large number of studies have also indicated that student outcomes are not independent of students' background. Therefore, pre-enrollment characteristics were controlled for this study.
Date: May 1994
Creator: Aluko, Stella Ola
Partner: UNT Libraries

Strategic International Human Resource Management: an Analysis of the Relationship between International Strategic Positioning and the Degree of Integrated Strategic Human Resource Management

Description: In Strategic International Human Resource Management (SIHRM), the human resource function is actively involved in the strategic activities of the firm. While the idea holds promise as a useful response to global competition, previous research has provided limited supporting empirical evidence. Specifically, few studies have sought to equate certain outcomes with the degree of SIHRM practiced across various types of international firms. By separating firms into categories such as multidomestic, global, and hybrid, and by classifying SIHRM according to the degree of integration with strategic planning, a clearer picture could emerge as to the relationship between firm and SIHRMtype. To that end, top strategic executives, such as CEOs, and top HRM executives from eighty four U.S. based firms were surveyed regarding their firm type, the degree of SIHRM practiced, and certain outcomes such as amount of expatriate training and expatriate failure. Additionally, financial results were obtained to determine performance of various firms. Results indicated that while many companies choose a highly integrated formof SIHRM, there is no significant relationship between firm type and SIHRMtype. Additionally, there was no association detected between SIHRMtype and expatriate training and expatriate failure. Finally, there was no significant difference infinancialperformance between firms with the most integrated type of SIHRMand firms with less integrated versions. Interestingly, the HRMprofessionals were more likely to equate their firms with the most integrated types of SIHRMthan were other managers. This may mean that the relationship between HRM and strategic planning is often one of perception. A model of the relationships between SIHRM, firm type, HRM activities, and outcomes is proposed, along with suggestions for future research and limitations of the study.
Date: August 1996
Creator: Steingruber, William G. (William George)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Institutionalization of Ethics: a Cross-Cultural Perspective

Description: Business ethics is a much debated issue in contemporary America. As many ethical improprieties gained widespread attention, organizations tried to control the damage by institutionalizing ethics through a variety of structures, policies, and procedures. Although the institutionalization of ethics has become popular in corporate America, there is a lack of research in this area. The relationship between the cultural dimensions of individualism/collectivism, power distance, uncertainty avoidance, and masculinity/femininity and the perceptions of managers regarding the institutionalization of ethics is investigated in this study. This research also examined whether managers' level of cognitive moral development and locus of control influenced their perceptions. Data collection was performed through a mail survey of managers in the U.S. and India. Out of the 174 managers of American multinationals who responded to the survey, 86 were Americans and 88 were Indians. Results revealed that managers' perceptions were influenced by the four cultural dimensions. Managerial perceptions regarding the effectiveness of codes of ethics and the influence of referent groups varied according to their nationality. But, managers from both countries found implicit forms of institutionalizing ethics, such as organizational systems, culture, and leadership to be more effective in raising the ethical climate of organizations than explicit forms such as codes of ethics, ethics officers, and ethics ombudspeople. The results did not support the influence of moral reasoning level and locus of control type on managerial perceptions. The results suggested that in order for ethics institutionalization efforts to be successful, there must be a fit or compatibility between the implicit and explicit forms of institutionalizing ethics. The significance of this study rests on the fact that it enriched our understanding of how national culture affects managerial perceptions regarding the institutionalization of ethics. This is the first comparative study between U.S. managers and Indian managers that examines the variables, ...
Date: August 1996
Creator: Jose, Anita
Partner: UNT Libraries

A System of Selection and Human Resource Development for Small Retailers of Apparel and Accessories

Description: The study has a twofold purpose. The first is to determine the extent to which organized selection and training practices exist in small apparel and accessory retailing establishments, and the general attitude which small retailers of apparel and accessories express toward the value of selection and training functions. The second is to construct a practical system which can be used in small apparel and accessory retailing establishments.
Date: May 1973
Creator: Burr, Patricia LeMay
Partner: UNT Libraries

Job Satisfaction of Secondary School Principals in the Rivers State of Nigeria

Description: This study addresses these questions: (1) What is the relationship between secondary school principals' job satisfaction and their ages, educational level, salary, and years of experience on the job, size of school, and location of school? and (2) What is the relationship between two instruments that measure job satisfaction--The Job Descriptive Index (JDI) and The Job in General (JIG).
Date: May 1986
Creator: Maduagwu, Samuel Nwankwo
Partner: UNT Libraries

Analysis of Reporting Compliance of Labor Relations Consultants Under Section 203 (b) of the Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act, 1959

Description: This study examines the reporting compliance, as defined by section 203(b) of the Labor -Management Reporting and Disclosure Act (LMRDA), 1959, of labor relations consultants who engage in persuader activity. Organized labor suggests that the loss in union strength results, in large part, from management's use of labor relations consultants and their failure to file required reports with the U.S. Department of Labor. Two samples of labor relations consultants known to have engaged in persuader activity and two samples of those who could be engaged in persuader activity are identified. A research questionnaire is mailed to 779 of the total of 887 labor relations consultants for whom an address could be developed. Discriminant analysis using 16 variables correctly classifies 93.8 percent of the responding labor relations consultants grouped according to whether they had filed required reports. Other discriminant analyses using selected variables are also conducted. Three associated questions are answered. First, there are an estimated 850 labor relations consultants who have engaged in persuader activity or who can be presumed to have engaged in persuader activity. Of this number, almost 500 are estimated to have engaged in persuader activity and only 30 percent of these are estimated to have filed required reports. Second, the labor relations consultants surveyed is, on average, male, an attorney, is titled "president" and is located in California, Michigan or Illinois. Third, solely in the context of National Labor Relations Board election processes, the effect on the loss of the union strength caused by (1) labor relations consultants and (2) the failure of the consultants who engaged in persuader activity to file a required report cannot be determined. However, because the estimated decrease in the number of union members over the years 1960 - 1989 exceeds the number of eligible voters in N.L.R.B. elections lost by ...
Date: December 1990
Creator: Asdorian, Martin
Partner: UNT Libraries

Hostile Environment: A Discriminant Model of the Perceptions of Working Women

Description: This study examines the problem of operationally defining "hostile environment" sexual harassment, ruled a type of disparate treatment actionable under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act by the United States Supreme Court on June 19, 1986. Although the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission defines a hostile environment as an "intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment," there is no consensus as to what is "offensive" behavior. An extensive review of the literature yielded various attempts to define and ascertain the magnitude of sexual harassment, but the fact that the actual percentages varied indicates that this is a difficult issue to measure. As perception by the victim is the key, this study surveyed 125 working women from all over the United States to determine their perceptions of behaviors that constitute sexual harassment. Discriminant analysis was then used to correctly classify 95% of the women according to their perceptions of having experienced sexual harassment. Using tests for proportions, three hypotheses were found significant. Women who have been sexually harassed are more likely to view sexual harassment as a major problem. Older men are more likely to have their behavior perceived as sexual harassment. In addition, women who have experienced acts such as staring, flirting, or touching in the workplace are more likely to perceive those acts as sexual harassment. The hypotheses deemed not statistically significant yielded interesting results. Younger women are not more likely to be harassed than older women. Neither are single or divorced women more likely to experience sexual harassment. All women, regardless of age, marital status, or geographic location, are vulnerable to sexual harassment. Of importance are which variables contributed the most to the women's perceptions of sexual harassment. None of the demographic variables was found significant, but the women perceived that they had been sexually harassed if sexual remarks, ...
Date: August 1988
Creator: Kirk, Delaney, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Impact of EEO Legislation Upon Selection Procedures for Transfer, Training and Development and Promotion

Description: Legislation, court decisions, and the changing political and social climate provide evidence of the importance of the outcomes of EEO litigation involving challenged selection procedures for transfer, training and development, and promotion. These selection procedures are being challenged by more informed employees and, in many cases, result in costly litigation. Thus, organizations must be aware of the continuing developments in employment law especially as found in court decisions and related legislation. This study investigates judicial and EEOC decisions in discrimination cases to provide answers to these questions: Are organizations aware of the outcomes of EEO litigation involving challenged selection procedures for transfer, training and development, and promotion? Are organizations aware of what constitutes a discriminatory practice in the selection of employees for transfer, training and development, and promotion? Does management recognize and follow nondiscriminatory procedures in selecting personnel for transfer, training and development, and promotion? The purposes of the study are 1. To analyze outcomes of EEO litigation involving challenged selection procedures for transfer, training and development, and promotion; 2. To develop a model set of guidelines to aid organizations in developing nondiscriminatory procedures for use in selecting employees for transfer, training and development, and promotion. This study concludes that many employers are aware of the outcomes of EEO litigation involving challenged selection procedures for transfer, training and development, and promotion. Many employers are also aware of what constitutes a discriminatory practice in the selection of employees for some employment advantage. However, management does not always recognize and follow nondiscriminatory procedures when selecting employees for transfer, training and development, and promotion. The number of cases in which selection procedures were found discriminatory supports this conclusion.
Date: May 1985
Creator: Rach, Margaret M. (Margaret Mannion)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Impact of a Nursing Program on Stress, Physical Illness, Anxiety, and Self-Concept of Participants in a Community College Nursing Program

Description: This research study was designed to investigate the relationship between participation in a nursing education program and the factors of stress, physical illness, anxiety, and self-concept experienced by the participants. Also, the study examined the relationship between age of participants and these same factors. The purposes of this study were (1) to determine if beginning and ending nursing students differ in stress, physical illness, anxiety, and self-concept, (2) to examine the relationship between age of nursing students and stress, physical illness, anxiety, and self-concept, (3) to provide information that may help develop a theoretical base concerning stressful life events and illness in nursing students, and (4) to provide information that may be beneficial with regard to future research involving stress, physical illness, anxiety, self-concept, and age in nursing students.
Date: May 1987
Creator: Gray, Sylvia Jane
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Multivariate Investigation of Youth Voluntary Turnover

Description: The purposes of this study were twofold. The first was to construct a modified model of the voluntary turnover process that clarifies the antecedents of turnover intentions and turnover behavior. The second was to investigate empirically the proposed model's validity by assessing the influences of nine variables of job satisfaction, organizational commitment, job search, intention to stay in the organization, and six demographic variables as potential predictors of employee voluntary turnover.
Date: May 1985
Creator: Gaballa, Refaat M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Meeting the Requirements of Substantive and Procedural Criteria in Discharge Cases

Description: Legislation, arbitral and judicial decisions, and public opinion provide evidence of increasing concern for protecting employees from unfair dismissal in both union and nonunion firms. Management's right to discharge is being questioned today more than at any other time in the history of labor-management relations. Thus, organizations must stay abreast of the developments that affect their right to discharge employees. This study investigates arbitration awards and judicial decisions in discharge cases to provide answers to these questions. Are companies aware of the types of misconduct for which discharge is considered appropriate? Are companies aware of what constitutes the burden of proof requirements in discharge cases? Does management know and follow the proper procedures in handling discharge cases? The purposes of the study are 1. To determine the extent to which discharges were overturned or modified because the company did not meet the burden of proving a reasonable cause for discharge; 2. To determine the extent to which discharges were overturned or modified because the company did not follow proper dismissal procedures; 3. To develop a model set of guidelines to assist companies in the proper handling of discharge cases. These guidelines present criteria for meeting the just cause and procedural requirements in discharge cases.
Date: August 1981
Creator: Dollar, Alta L. (Alta Lewis)
Partner: UNT Libraries