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Nymphs of the Stonefly (Plecoptera) Genus Taeniopteryx of North America

Description: Nymphs of the 9 Nearctic Taeniopteryx species were reared and studied, 1976-78. Two morphologically allied groupings, the Taeniopteryx burksi-maura, and T. litalonicera- starki complexes corresponded with adult complexes. A key separating 7 species, based primarily upon pigment patterns and abdominal setal arrangements, was constructed. Taeniopteryx lita and T. starki were indistinguishable; T. burksi was separated from T. maurawhen no developing femoral spur was present. This study was based upon 839 nymphs. Mouthparts were not species-diagnostic. Detailed habitus illustrations were made for 6 species. Egg SEM study revealed that 3 species were 1.2-1.4 mm diameter, with a highly sculptured chorion, generally resembling a Maclura fruit; micropyle were scattered. Taeniopteryx lita, lonicera, starki and ugola nymphs were described for the first time.
Date: May 1978
Creator: Fullington, Kate Matthews
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Determination of Organic-Bound Chlorine Levels in Municipal Wastewaters After Treatment with Heavy Chlorine Doses

Description: The development of an analytical method for the determination of total organic-bound chlorine (TOCl) produced during the chlorination of municipal wastewater effluents is presented. Sewage effluent from the Denton, Texas municipal treatment plant was chlorinated at high chlorine doses (1000 - 4000 ppm), as well as typical treatment levels. Chlororganics present in the wastewater, before and after chlorination, were concentrated by adsorption on Amberlite XAD-2 macroreticular resin, followed by elution with diethyl ether. After concentration, the extracts were analyzed for TOC1 by microcoulometry. Analysis of wastewater extracts revealed the production of substantial amounts of new chlorinated organics when effluents were treated with chlorine. The method shows good precision and estimated accuracy is favorable.
Date: May 1976
Creator: Smith, Garmon B.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Distribution, Abundance, and Food Habits of Larval Fish in a Cooling Reservoir

Description: Analysis of larval fish collected at four stations in a 330-ha cooling reservoir indicated Dorosoma spp. were most numerous at all stations, followed by Lepomis spp. and Percina Macrolepida. Largest numbers and greatest diversity of larval fish were found at the station least affected by thermal effluent; the mid-lake station provided the smallest numbers and least diversity. The two warmwater stations were intermediate, with similar numbers and diversity. Diversity and abundance of zooplankton between stations were similar to those of fish. The most abundant zooplankter (Bosmina) was generally selected against by Dorosoma, Lepomis and Micropterus spp. larvae except when the larvae were quite small ((10mm). Cyclopoid copepods were most often selected by all larvae.
Date: December 1978
Creator: Mitterer, Lana Gayle
Partner: UNT Libraries

Size Fractionation of Metabolically Active Phytoplankton and Bacteria in Two Diverse Lentic Systems

Description: Simultaneous size fractionation of plankton populations associated with NaH^14CO_3 and ^3H-glucose uptake was employed in eutrophic Lake Texoma (Texas and Oklahoma) and oligotrophic Flathead Lake (Montana). Autoradiography was utilized to determine the role of specific microorganisms in community metabolism. Ultraplankton (0.45-10 μm) dominated plankton numbers and metabolic activity in both aquatic systems. Many of the most abundant species were not the most productive, in terms of inorganic C fixation. Rates of heterotrophic uptake of ^3H-glucose were small in comparison to photolithotrophic uptake in both lakes, Photoheterotrophy was more extensive in Flathead Lake, Autoradiographs indicated that bacteria were responsible for observed photoheterotrophy. Oscillatoria sp. exhibited. mixotrophy in Lake Texoma,
Date: August 1980
Creator: Ellis, Bonnie K.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Production and Energy Metabolism in Three Benthic Insect Populations in a Small North Central Texas Pond

Description: Annual energy budgets of dominant benthic macro-invertebrates were examined during November 1973 to October 1974 from the benthos of a small pond ecosystem in north-central Texas. Estimates of annual secondary production (Hynes and Coleman 1968) were Procladius s. (Diptera, Chironimidae), 2.4 g m^-2 y^-1 (13 kcal m^-2 y^-1 ); Tendipes decorus (Diptera, Chironomidae), 6.0 g m^-2 y^-1 (40 kcal m^-2 y^-1 ); Brachycercus sp. (Ephemeroptera, Caenidae), 1.9 g m^-2 y^-1 (11 kcal m^-2 y^-1). Energy metabolism was measured in the laboratory at six seasonally encountered temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 C) on an acclimatization basis, and then extrapolated to the field. Estimates of annual energy metabolism are Procladius sp., 5.0 kcal m^-2 y^-1 ; Tendipes decorus, 17.2 kcal m^-2 y^-1 ; Brachycercus sp. 40.0 kcal m^-2 y^-1.
Date: May 1978
Creator: Benson, Daniel J.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Trophic Structure and Energy Flow in a Texas Pond

Description: Annual energy flow and mean annual biocontent of eighteen compartments were determined for a 0.94 ha north central Texas pond ecosystem. Annual primary production was 7,780 kcal m^-2 yr^-2, and community production-to-respiration ratio was 1.49. One-third of annual primary production accumulated on the substrate as silt and sedimentation. Community production, production-respiration ratio, and biocontents of all compartments except aquatic insects were large in summer, small in winter. Biocontents of four trophic levels in the pond were all of the same order of magnitude, approximately 50 kcal m^-2. Suspended and benthic organic material forprimary consumers and terrestrial insects for tertiary consumers were substantial allochthanous energy imports into the pond system.
Date: August 1978
Creator: Childress, William M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Food Habits of Stoneflies (Plecoptera) in the Gunnison and Dolores Rivers, Colorado

Description: Gut contents of 2,500 stonefly nymphs, comprising 10 species, from the Gunnison and Dolores Rivers, Colorado were examined from Dec., 1974-Oct., 1975. Perlidae species were carnivorous feeding primarily on chironomids, mayflies and caddisflies. Seasonal patterns of ingestion and preference varied among species and predator sizes and between rivers. Early instar polyphagous species utilized detritus in the fall, eventually shifting to carnivorous habits as they grew through winter-spring. Pteronarcids fed predominantly on detritus. Dietary overlap of predators was greatest in the Gunnison River, with subtle mechanisms such as prey species and size selectivity, temporal succession and seasonal shifts to detritus-plant material in some, providing reduction of competition. A more complete partitioning of prey resources was evident in the Dolores River.
Date: August 1976
Creator: Fuller, Randall L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Life History of the Mayfly Isonychia sicca (Walsh) (Ephemeroptera--Siphlonuridae) in an Intermittent Stream in North Central Texas

Description: The life history of Isonychia sicca (Walsh) was elucidated from samples collected at Clear Creek from Oct. 1976-Jun. 1978, and Elm Fork of the Trinity River from Sept. 1977-Jun. 1978, Denton County, Texas. Adaptations for existence in an intermittent stream were of primary concern. Eggs are capable of diapausing through hot, dry summers and cold, wet or dry winters. Diapause is broken in the fall after rehydration and/or in the spring. I. sicca is usually bivoltine during a Sept.-Jul. wet period. Observations from Elm Fork indicate that emergence continues to Oct. if the stream remains permanent. Considerable overlap occurs between overwintering, spring, and summer populations.
Date: December 1978
Creator: Grant, Peter M., fl. 1978-
Partner: UNT Libraries

Thermal Selection at an Enzyme Locus in Populations of the Red Shiner, Notropis lutrensis, Receiving Hypolimnion Effluents from a Reservoir

Description: Genetic variation was examined at 19 loci encoding enzymatic and general proteins Notropis lutrensis from the Brazos River in Texas. The thermal regime of the Brazos River below Possum Kingdom Reservoir is altered due to the release of water from the hypolimnion. Summer water temperatures fluctuate as much as 7^oC. Levels of heterozygosity at the malate dehydrogenase-2 locus were correlated with the degree of water temperature fluctuation at each locality. The isozymes from three homozygous patterns of supernatant malate dehydrogenase (Mdh-l, Mdh-2) exhibited different activities at different experimental temperatures.
Date: May 1978
Creator: Richmond, M. Carol
Partner: UNT Libraries

Life History Allocation of Energy to Growth and Reproduction in Gizzard Shad, Dorosoma cepedianum, in North Central Texas

Description: Life history allocation of energy to growth and reproduction was determined for female gizzard shad. Absolute caloric energy allocated to eggs increased with age. The relative amount of production energy directed to reproduction increased with age up to 5 years and then decreased. Seasonal variation in lipids was studied. Quantitative changes occurred in ovarian lipids during the reproductive cycle. Carcass lipids varied seasonally. Age of sexual maturity was 3 years. Delayed maturity is attributed to high allocation of energy to growth enabling shad to outgrow intense competition and predation in pre-reproductive ages; there is little competition and predation in reproductive shad. Growth rates and condition factors indicated constant availability of food seasonally.
Date: December 1976
Creator: Fagan, Joseph A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Pelagic Phytoplankton and Physicochemical Correlates for Lake Texoma

Description: An analysis and correlation of phytoplankton communities with physicochemical data from 3 sites in Lake Texoma was conducted to supplement time-series data. Water and phytoplankton were sampled monthly, March, 1976-February, 1977. Simple correlations were run between all physicochemical parameters and phytoplankton standing crop from the 3 sites. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to develop equations predictive of phytoplankton standing crop and chloride concentration. Minerals leached from marine sediments in the Red River chennel contribute to formation of a, halocline which seals the anoxic hypolimnion from the reservoir surface in midsummer. Conductivity decreased west to east, 2980-1800. pmhos/cm. Maximum mean annual phytoplankton standing crop in Red River arm was 36 percent greater than midlake. Eutrophication was evident.
Date: December 1978
Creator: McCullough, William P.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Responses of Fishes to a Low pH Environment

Description: Data were collected from natural and introduced fishes present in Ferndale Lake, a small (120 ha) sport fishing reservoir in Camp County, east Texas. Levels of pH measured in the lake during the study period ranged from 3.5 to 5.3. Monthly field surveys and experimental manipulations were designed to evaluate quantitatively the signs of stress at various biological levels. Lethal limits to low pH were quantified for largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) to be pH 3.8 and 4.0,respectively. Mean blood pH (+ 1 SD) of 59 bluegill was 7.41 (j 0.16), with no significant difference (P-0.05) among groups from Ferndale Lake and Moss Lake (Cooke Co., Texas) under experimental conditions, even when severe stress was externally apparent. In a dual-trough horizontal pH gradient, bluegill behavioral avoidance was observed at pH levels below 7.0. Individual testing of 40 bluegill in pH gradient of 5.2 to 7.6 resulted in median occupation of pH 7.1,with an interquartile range of pH 6.9 to 7.3. Decreased community structure and population "well being" compared to early studies cannot be attributed entirely to recent acidic condition. Separating potential stress due to lake conditions from that due to heavy biotic predation by sport fishing in a small reservoir is difficult.
Date: August 1981
Creator: Prete, Philip J. (Philip John)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Seasonal and Spatial Variability of the Microcrustacean Community in Lake Texoma, Texas and Oklahoma

Description: Twenty-eight species of zooplankton were identified from Lake Texoma. Seasonal density of the overall microcrustacean community and seasonal cycles of individual species were compared with northern populations and any available literature from the Southwest. Cycles of occurrence and abundance were similar to those observed in northern populations but tended to occur earlier in the year due to higher temperatures. Spatial distributions within the reservoir were heavily influenced by nutrient and salt input from the Red River, which resulted in dense populations in the Red River Arm. In addition, during the summer, the microcrustacean community was restricted to the epilimnion due to anoxic conditions in the hypolimnion of the reservoir.
Date: August 1980
Creator: Crist, Lawrence W.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Use of ATP as a Planktonic Biomass Indicator in Reservoir Limnology

Description: A series of laboratory experiments and a field investigation were conducted to closely define the application of the ATP assay and ATP as a planktonic biomass estimator for routine use in reservoir limnology. The laboratory experiments verified the published range of C:ATP ratios (i.e. 250:1) as a conversion factor for ATP to biomass in cultured selected genera of freshwater algae, except for the species of blue-green algae examined. The field investigation conducted at Moss Reservoir included organic carbon measurements with ATP biomass in size classes on a depth basis. The ATP biomass varied seasonally and with depth; the best significant mtltiple correlation was between organic carbon and the smallest size class (.45 to 10 um) and total net plankton biomass (.45 to 165 um). Daily monitoring of biomass in size classes demonstrated the sensitivity of the technique.
Date: August 1978
Creator: Perry, William B.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Genic Differentiation Between Two Chromosomal Races of Pocket Gophers, Geomys bursarius

Description: Genic data from two chromosomal races of Geomys bursarius from a contact zone in central Texas indicated that the two races possessed distinct gene pools which would define them as separate species. Data from proteins encoded from 21 loci in this study substantiated this hypothesis. A pattern of alternately fixed alleles at the ADH-l, MDH-2, LDH-l, and IDH-1 loci with no apparent gene flow in zones of contact strongly suggested that these two races should be designated as separate species. Levels of heterozygosity and high FST values indicate that genomic structuring within Geomys is most heavily influenced by high levels of inbreeding and low migration rates. Fossorial rodents were suggested to undergo speciation primarily through parapatric means.
Date: May 1980
Creator: Bohlin, Raymond G.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Population Dynamics of Macrobenthos in a Regulated Stream 1970-71 and 1978

Description: Stability of the macrobenthic community in a regulated section of the Brazos River, Texas, was evaluated. Physicochemical data and information on spatial distribution of macrobenthos were collected. Populations of two invertebrate species, Isonychia sicca and Neoperla clymene, had been greatly reduced since 1970-71 and I. sicca had been practically eliminated from this section of the Brazos. Three other insect populations, Choroterpes mexicanus, Cheumatopsche campyla and Cheumatopsyche lasia, had more than doubled their numbers since the 1970-71 study. A physicochemical gradient existed in this regulated section of the Brazos but it appeared to have changed little in comparison of earlier chemical data. A gradation of the macrobenthic community was evident as distance from the dam increased,
Date: August 1981
Creator: Coulter, James D. (James Duard)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Limitation of Primary Productivity in a Southwestern Reservoir Due to Thermal Pollution

Description: Evidence is presented to support the conclusions that (1) North Lake reservoir is less productive, contains lower standing crops of phytoplankton and total organic carbon than other local reservoirs; (2) that neither the phytoplankton nor their instantaneously-determined primary productivity was detrimentally affected by the power plant entrainment and (3) that the effect of the power plant is to cause nutrient limitation of the phytoplankton primary productivity by long-term, subtle, thermally-linked nutrient precipitation activities.
Date: August 1977
Creator: Stuart, Tom J.
Location Info:
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Relation Between Carbon Assimilation and Biomass Dynamics in a Phytoplankton Community

Description: Production dynamics in the phytoplankton community of a mesotrophic Texas reservoir were measured weekly over a four month period using 14C incubation and ATP assay methodologies. Assimilation values of 14C ranged from 0.2 to 45 ug C 1 hr1 - . Significant positive and occasionally negative changes in biomass (i.e. viable organic carbon) were observed in short term (4 hr) in situ incubations juxtapo-sitioned with the 14C experiments; viable organic carbon production, estimated with the ATP assay, ranged from -25 to +50 ug C 1l1hr1. Carbon assimilation and biomass changes did not correlate in either short term (4-5 hr.) or over the study period (6 months). However, weekly biomass trends were predicted by relative positive or negative biomass changes in the short term incubations. Biomass measurements gave a more sensitive insight into production dynamics in the phytoplankton community than did carbon assimilation measurements.
Date: December 1977
Creator: Wilcox, Douglas P.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Comparative Chemistry of Thermally Stressed North Lake and Its Water Source, Elm Fork Trinity River

Description: To better understand abiotic dynamics in Southern reservoirs receiving heated effluents, water was analyzed before and after impoundment in 330 ha North Lake. Macronutrients, metals, and chlorinated hydrocarbons were measured. Concentrations of nutrients and metals in sediments were quantified in this 2 yr study. River water prior to impoundment contained 16 times more total phosphorus, and supported 23 times more Selenastrum capricornutum cells in an algal assay than reservoir water. The reservoir has essentially no drainage and since evaporation is high, the concentrations of many dissolved solids have increased since the reservoir was filled in 1958. North Lake is now phosphorus limited. Apparently altered chemical equilibria have caused precipitation or adsorption of phosphorus with calcium and iron.
Date: December 1976
Creator: Sams, Barry L.
Partner: UNT Libraries