31 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Composite wire plasma formation and evolution

Description: The detailed understanding of the formation and evolution of plasma from rapidly heated metallic wires is a long-standing challenge in the field of plasma physics and in exploding wire engineering. This physical process is made even more complicated if the wire material is composed of a number of individual layers. The authors have successfully developed both optical and x-ray backlighting diagnostics. In particular, the x-ray backlighting technique has demonstrated the capability for quantitative determination of the plasma density over a wide range of densities. This diagnostic capability shows that the process of plasma formation is composed of two separate phases: first, current is passed through a cold wire and the wire is heated ohmically, and, second, the heated wire evolves gases that break down and forms a low-density plasma surrounding the wire.
Date: January 1, 2000
Creator: Spielman, R.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wire number doubling in plasma-shell regime increases z-accelerator x-ray power

Description: Doubling the number of tungsten wires from 120 to 240, keeping the mass fixed, increased the radiated x-ray power relative to the electrical power at the insulator stack of the z accelerator by (40{+-}20)% for 8.75- and 20-mm-radii z-pinch wire arrays. Radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic calculations suggest that the arrays were operating in the {open_quotes}plasma shell{close_quotes} regime, where the plasmas generated by the individual wires merge prior to the inward implosion of the entire array.
Date: November 1, 1997
Creator: Sanford, T.W.L.; Spielman, R.B. & Chandler, G.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pulsed power performance of PBFA Z

Description: PBFA Z is a new 60-TW/5-MJ electrical driver located at Sandia National Laboratories. The authors use PBFA Z to drive z pinches. The pulsed power design of PBFA Z is based on conventional single-pulse Marx generator, water-line pulse-forming technology used on the earlier Saturn and PBFA II accelerators. PBFA Z stores 11.4 MJ in its 36 Marx generators, couples 5 MJ in a 60-TW/105-ns pulse to the output water transmission lines, and delivers 3.0 MJ and 50 TW of electrical energy to the z-pinch load. Depending on the initial load inductance and the implosion time, the authors attain peak currents of 16-20 MA with a rise time of 105 ns. Current is fed to the z-pinch load through self magnetically-insulated transmission lines (MITLs). Peak electric fields in the MITLs exceed 2 MV/cm. The current from the four independent conical-disk MITLs is combined together in a double post-hole vacuum convolute with an efficiency greater than 95%. The authors achieved x-ray powers of 200 TW and x-ray energies of 1.9 MJ from tungsten wire-array z-pinch loads.
Date: August 1, 1997
Creator: Spielman, R.B.; Stygar, W.A. & Seamen, J.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

D-dot and B-dot monitors for Z-vacuum-section power-flow measurements

Description: The 36-module Z accelerator--designed to drive z-pinch loads at currents up to 20 MA--is contained in a 33-m-diameter tank with oil, water, and vacuum sections. The peak total forward-going power in the 36 water-section bi-plate transmission lines is approximately 63 TW. nine transmission lines deliver power to each of the four vacuum-section levels (referred to as levels A (the uppermost), B, C, and D). New differential D-dot and B-dot monitors were developed for the Z vacuum section. The D-dots measure voltage at the insulator stack. The B-dots measure current at the stack and in the outer magnetically-insulated transmission lines. Each monitor has two outputs that allow common-mode noise to be canceled to first order. The differential D-dot has one signal and one noise channel; the differential B-dot has two signal channels with opposite polarities. Each of the two B-dot sensors in the differential B-dot monitor has four 3-mm-diameter loops and is encased in copper to reduce flux penetration. For both types of probes, two 2.2-mm-diameter coaxial-cables connect the outputs to a Prodyn balun for common-mode-noise rejection. The cables provide reasonable bandwidth and generate acceptable levels of Compton drive in Z`s bremsstrahlung field. A new cavity B-dot is being developed to measure the total Z current 4.3 cm from the axis of the z-pinch load. All of the sensors are calibrated with 2--4% accuracy. The monitor signals are reduced with Barth or Weinschel attenuators, recorded on Tektronix 0.5-ns/sample digitizing oscilloscopes, and software cable compensated and integrated.
Date: August 1, 1997
Creator: Stygar, W.A.; Spielman, R.B. & Ives, H.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wire number doubling in plasma-shell regime increases Z-accelerator X-ray power

Description: Doubling the number of tungsten wires from 120 to 240, keeping the mass fixed, increased the radiated x-ray power relative to the electrical power at the insulator stack of the z accelerator by (40 {+-} 20)% for 8.75- and 20-mm-radii z-pinch wire arrays. Radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic calculations suggest that the arrays were operating in the plasma shell regime, where the plasma generated by the individual wires merge prior to the inward implosion of the entire array.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Sanford, T.W.L.; Spielman, R.B. & Chandler, G.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

D-D fusion experiments using fast Z pinches

Description: The development of high current (I > 10 MA) drivers provides the authors with a new tool for the study of neutron-producing plasmas in the thermal regime. The imploded deuterium mass (or collisionality) increases as I{sup 2} and the ability of the driver to heat the plasma to relevant fusion temperatures improves as the power of the driver increases. Additionally, fast (<100 ns) implosions are more stable to the usual MHD instabilities that plagued the traditional slower implosions. The authors describe experiments in which deuterium gas puffs or CD{sub 2} fiber arrays were imploded in a fast z-pinch configuration on Sandia`s Saturn facility generating up to 3 {times} 10{sup 12} D-D neutrons. These experiments were designed to explore the physics of neutron-generating plasmas in a z-pinch geometry. Specifically, the authors intended to produce neutrons from a nearly thermal plasma where the electrons and ions have a nearly Maxwellian distribution. This is to be clearly differentiated from the more usual D-D beam-target neutrons generated in many dense plasma focus (DPF) devices.
Date: March 1, 1998
Creator: Spielman, R.B.; Baldwin, G.T. & Cooper, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analytic Models of High-Temperature Hohlraums

Description: A unified set of high-temperature-hohlraum models has been developed. For a simple hohlraum, P{sub s} = [A{sub s}+(1{minus}{alpha}{sub W})A{sub W}+A{sub H}]{sigma}T{sub R}{sup 4} + (4V{sigma}/c)(dT{sub R}{sup r}/dt) where P{sub S} is the total power radiated by the source, A{sub s} is the source area, A{sub W} is the area of the cavity wall excluding the source and holes in the wall, A{sub H} is the area of the holes, {sigma} is the Stefan-Boltzmann constant, T{sub R} is the radiation brightness temperature, V is the hohlraum volume, and c is the speed of light. The wall albedo {alpha}{sub W} {triple_bond} (T{sub W}/T{sub R}){sup 4} where T{sub W} is the brightness temperature of area A{sub W}. The net power radiated by the source P{sub N} = P{sub S}-A{sub S}{sigma}T{sub R}{sup 4}, which suggests that for laser-driven hohlraums the conversion efficiency {eta}{sub CE} be defined as P{sub N}/P{sub LASER}. The characteristic time required to change T{sub R}{sup 4} in response to a change in P{sub N} is 4V/C[(l{minus}{alpha}{sub W})A{sub W}+A{sub H}]. Using this model, T{sub R}, {alpha}{sub W}, and {eta}{sub CE} can be expressed in terms of quantities directly measurable in a hohlraum experiment. For a steady-state hohlraum that encloses a convex capsule, P{sub N} = {l_brace}(1{minus}{alpha}{sub W})A{sub W}+A{sub H}+[(1{minus}{alpha}{sub C})(A{sub S}+A{sub W}{alpha}{sub W})A{sub C}/A{sub T}]{r_brace}{sigma}T{sub RC}{sup 4} where {alpha}{sub C} is the capsule albedo, A{sub C} is the capsule area, A{sub T} {triple_bond} (A{sub S}+A{sub W}+A{sub H}), and T{sub RC} is the brightness temperature of the radiation that drives the capsule. According to this relation, the capsule-coupling efficiency of the baseline National-Ignition-Facility (NIF) hohlraum is 15% higher than predicted by previous analytic expressions. A model of a hohlraum that encloses a z pinch is also presented.
Date: November 29, 2000
Creator: Stygar, W.A.; Olson, R.E.; Spielman, R.B. & Leeper, R.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A new linear inductive voltage adder driver for the Saturn Accelerator

Description: Saturn is a dual-purpose accelerator. It can be operated as a large-area flash x-ray source for simulation testing or as a Z-pinch driver especially for K-line x-ray production. In the first mode, the accelerator is fitted with three concentric-ring 2-MV electron diodes, while in the Z-pinch mode the current of all the modules is combined via a post-hole convolute arrangement and driven through a cylindrical array of very fine wires. We present here a point design for a new Saturn class driver based on a number of linear inductive voltage adders connected in parallel. A technology recently implemented at the Institute of High Current Electronics in Tomsk (Russia) is being utilized. In the present design we eliminate Marx generators and pulse-forming networks. Each inductive voltage adder cavity is directly fed by a number of fast 100-kV small-size capacitors arranged in a circular array around each accelerating gap. The number of capacitors connected in parallel to each cavity defines the total maximum current. By selecting low inductance switches, voltage pulses as short as 30-50-ns FWHM can be directly achieved. The voltage of each stage is low (100-200 kv). Many stages are required to achieve multi-megavolt accelerator output. However, since the length of each stage is very short (4-10 cm), accelerating gradients of higher than 1 MV/m can easily be obtained. The proposed new driver will be capable of delivering pulses of 15-MA, 36-TW, 1.2-MJ to the diode load, with a peak voltage of {minus}2.2 MV and FWHM of 40-ns. And although its performance will exceed the presently utilized driver, its size and cost could be much smaller ({approximately}1/3). In addition, no liquid dielectrics like oil or deionized water will be required. Even elimination of ferromagnetic material (by using air-core cavities) is a possibility.
Date: August 9, 2000
Creator: Mazarakis, M.G.; Spielman, R.B.; Struve, K.W. & Long, F.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design and performance of the Z magnetically-insulated transmission lines

Description: The 36-module Z accelerator was designed to drive z-pinch loads for weapon-physics and inertial-confinement-fusion experiments, and to serve as a testing facility for pulsed-power research required to develop higher-current drivers. The authors have designed and tested a 10-nH 1.5-m-radius vacuum section for the Z accelerator. The vacuum section consists of four vacuum flares, four conical 1.3-m-radius magnetically-insulated transmission lines, a 7.6-cm-radius 12-post double-post-hole convolute which connects the four outer MITLs in parallel, and a 5-cm-long inner MITL which connects the output of the convolute to a z-pinch load. IVORY and ELECTRO calculations were performed to minimize the inductance of the vacuum flares with the constraint that there be no significant electron emission from the insulator-stack grading rings. Iterative TLCODE calculations were performed to minimize the inductance of the outer MITLs with the constraint that the MITL electron-flow-current fraction be {le} 7% at peak current. The TLCODE simulations assume a 2.5 cm/{micro}s MITL-cathode-plasma expansion velocity. The design limits the electron dose to the outer-MITL anodes to 50 J/g to prevent the formation of an anode plasma. The TLCODE results were confirmed by SCREAMER, TRIFL, TWOQUICK, IVORY, and LASNEX simulations. For the TLCODE, SCREAMER, and TRIFL calculations, the authors assume that after magnetic insulation is established, the electron-flow current launched in the outer MITLs is lost at the convolute. This assumption has been validated by 3-D QUICKSILVER simulations for load impedances {le} 0.36 ohms. LASNEX calculations suggest that ohmic resistance of the pinch and conduction-current-induced energy loss to the MITL electrodes can be neglected in Z power-flow modeling that is accurate to first order. To date, the Z vacuum section has been tested on 100 shots. They have demonstrated they can deliver a 100-ns rise-time 20-MA current pulse to the baseline z-pinch load.
Date: August 1997
Creator: Stygar, W. A.; Spielman, R. B. & Allshouse, G. O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Z accelerator as a source of > 100 kJ of x-rays above 4.8 keV

Description: Recent K-shell scaling experiments on the 20 MA Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories have shown that large diameter (40 and 55 mm) arrays can be imploded with 80 to 210 wires of titanium or stainless steel. These implosions have produced up to 150 kJ of > 4.5 keV x-rays and 65 kJ of > 6.0 keV x-rays in 7 to 18 ns FWHM pulses. This is a major advance in plasma radiation source (PRS) capability since there is presently limited test capability above 3 keV. In fact, Z produces more > 4.5 keV x-rays than previous aboveground simulators produced at 1.5 keV. Z also produces some 200 kJ of x-rays between 1 and 3 keV in a continuous spectrum for these loads. The measured spectra and yields are consistent with 1-dimensional MHD calculations performed by NRL. Thermoelastic calorimeters, PVDF gauges, and optical impulse gauges have been successfully fielded with these sources.
Date: April 13, 1998
Creator: Deeney, C.; Coverdale, C. A. & Spielman, R. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PBFA Z: A 20-MA z-pinch driver for plasma radiation sources

Description: Sandia National Laboratories is completing a major modification to the PBFA-II facility. PBFA Z will be a z-pinch driver capable of delivering up to 20 MA to a z-pinch load. It optimizes the electrical coupling to the implosion energy of z pinches at implosion velocities of {approximately} 40 cm/{mu}s. Design constraints resulted in an accelerator with a 0.12-{Omega} impedance, a 10.25-nH inductance, and a 120-ns pulse width. The design required new water transmission lines, insulator stack, and vacuum power feeds. Current is delivered to the z-pinch load through four, self-magnetically-insulated vacuum transmission lines and a double post-hole convolute. A variety of design codes are used to model the power flow. These predict a peak current of 20 MA to a z-pinch load having a 2-cm length, a 2-cm radius, and a 15--mg mass, coupling 1.5 MJ into kinetic energy. We present 2-D Rad-Hydro calculations showing MJ x-ray outputs from tungsten wire-array z pinches.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Spielman, R.B.; Breeze, S.F. & Deeney, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of the Effects of Waterline Switch Capacitance on the Electrical Prepulse of the Z-Accelerator

Description: The Z-accelerator at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) was modified in 1996 to deliver a 20 MA pulse to a z-pinch load in 100 ns. The pulsed-power driver is a 36-module waterline accelerator. Each waterline contains four self-break switches as part of the pulse-forming section. A study was conducted to investigate the effects of increasing the capacitance of the waterline switches on the shape of the electrical prepulse at the load. Past studies have shown that increasing the prepulse at the z-pinch load increases the x-ray output power. In this study, one set of switches with its surrounding waterline hardware was modeled in 3-D and capacitance calculated using the electrostatic code, COULOME. The capacitance values were used in a SCREAMER model of the Z-accelerator. SCREAMER an SNL developed, lumped-element circuit code was used to calculate the time-dependent current waveforms delivered to the z-pinch load. The design was changed and a new capacitance matrix and output waveforms were calculated. This paper presents the results of the COULOMB 3-D modeling, and the SCREAMER circuit-model analyses.
Date: August 2, 1999
Creator: Shoup, R.W.; Spielman, R.B.; Struve, K.W. & Stygar, W.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plasma density profiles and finite bandwidth effects on electron heating

Description: Intense, p-polarized microwaves are incident on an inhomogeneous plasma in a cylindrical waveguide. Microwaves are mainly absorbed by resonant absorption near the critical surface (where the plasma frequency, ..omega../sub pe/, equals the microwave frequency, ..omega../sub o/). The localized plasma waves strongly modify the plasma density. Step-plateau density profiles or a cavity are created depending on the plasma flow speed. Hot electron production is strongly affected by the microwave bandwidth. The hot electron temperature varies as T/sub H/ is proportional to (..delta.. ..omega../..omega..)/sup -0/ /sup 25/. As the hot electron temperature decreases with increasing driver bandwidth, the hot electron density increases. This increase is such that the heat flux into the overdense region (Q is proportional to eta/sub H/T/sub H//sup 3/ /sup 2/) is nearly constant.
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Spielman, R.B.; Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Bollen, W.M. & Woo, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electron heating due to resonant absorption

Description: Intense, p-polarized microwaves (v/sub os//v/sub eo-/<1) are incident on an imhomogeneous plasma (10/sup 2/<L/lambda/sub Deo-/<10/sup 3/) in the UC Davis PROMETHEUS I device. Microwaves are mainly absorbed by resonant absorption near the critical surface (where the plasma frequency equals microwave frequency). Suprathermal electrons are heated by resonantly driven electrostatic field to produce a hot Maxwellian distribution. Most of the heated electrons flow towards the overdense region and are absorbed by the anode at the far end of the overdense region. At high power (v/sub os//v/sub eo-/>0.2), strong heating of thermal electrons, large amplitude ion acoustic turbulence, and a self-consistent dc electric field are observed near the critical surface. This dc electric field is enhanced by applying a weak magnetic field (..omega../sub ce//..omega../sub o/ approx. = 10/sup -2/).
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Mizuno, K.; Spielman, R.B.; DeGroot, J.S. & Bollen, W.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fast Resistive Bolometry

Description: Resistive bolometry is an accurate, robust, spectrally broadband technique for measuring absolute x-ray fluence and flux. Bolometry is an independent technique for x-ray measurements that is based on a different set of physical properties than other diagnostics such as x-ray diodes, photoconducting detectors, and P-I-N diodes. Bolometers use the temperature-driven change in element resistivity to determine the total deposited energy. The calibration of such a device is based on fundamental material properties and its physical dimensions. We describe the use of nickel and gold bolometers to measure x rays generated by high-power z pinches on Sandia's Saturn and Z accelerators. The Sandia bolometer design described herein has a pulse response of {approximately}1 ns. We describe in detail the fabrication, fielding, and data analysis issues leading to highly accurate x-ray measurements. The fundamental accuracy of resistive bolometry will be discussed.
Date: February 1, 1999
Creator: Deeney, C.; Fehl, D.L.; Hanson, D.L.; Keltner, N.R.; McGurn, J.S.; McKenney, J.L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fielding and calibration issues for diamond photoconducting detectors

Description: Diamond photoconducting detectors are routinely fielded as soft x-ray diagnostics on Sandia`s Saturn facility. We have developed an improved detector mount that provides a 200-ps time response, is easily cleanable, and is very rugged. In addition, we have developed a new, fast insertion unit to apply bias voltage to the detectors. Absolute calibration of the PCDs is carried out either at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source or on Sandia`s laser calibration facility. We are now fielding diamond elements that have the dimensions 1x3x0.5 nun and 1x1xO.5 mm. We are neutron damaging some of the 1x1xO.5-mm detectors to reduce their sensitivity. We can tailor PCD sensitivity by adjusting element size and neutron damage level.
Date: December 1, 1996
Creator: Spielman, R.B.; Ruggles, L.E.; Pepping, R.E.; Breeze, S.F.; McGurn, J.S. & Struve, K.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Z-Pinch Driven Isentropic Compression for Inertial Fusion

Description: The achievement of high gain with inertial fusion requires the compression of hydrogen isotopes to high density and temperatures. High densities can be achieved most efficiently by isentropic compression. This requires relatively slow pressure pulses on the order of 10-20 nanoseconds; however, the pressure profile must have the appropriate time. We present 1-D numerical simulations that indicate such a pressure profile can be generated by using pulsed power driven z pinches. Although high compression is calculated, the initial temperature is too low for ignition. Ignition could be achieved by heating a small portion of this compressed fuel with a short (-10 ps) high power laser pulse as previously described. Our 1-D calculations indicate that the existing Z-accelerator could provide the driving current (-20 MA) necessary to compress fuel to roughly 1500 times solid density. At this density the required laser energy is approximately 10 kJ. Multidimensional effects such as the Rayleigh-Taylor were not addressed in this brief numerical study. These effects will undoubtedly lower fuel compression for a given chive current. Therefore it is necessary to perform z-pinch driven compression experiments. Finally, we present preliminary experimental data from the Z-accelerator indicating that current can be efficiently delivered to appropriately small loads (- 5 mm radius) and that VISAR can be used measure high pressure during isentropic compression.
Date: February 1, 1999
Creator: Asay, J.R.; Hall, C.A.; Holland, K.G.; Slutz, S.A.; Spielman, R.B. & Stygar, W.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Water-line design and performance of Z

Description: A new set of bi-plate transmission lines have been designed and installed in the water-section of PBFA-II for the Z-pinch experiments. Thirty-six aluminum flat-plate transmission lines submerged in a water dielectric deliver a timed electrical pulse from coaxial tube sections to a ring stack section. Each of the lines are electrically isolated from each other by transit-time effects. The water-lines are configured radially at four vertical levels. Each level has nine sets of bi-plates, with a transition section that is unique to that level. Mechanically, the bi-plate sections are designed to carry both static and dynamic loads. Electrically, the lines are designed to transport electrical pulses that average 200 nanoseconds with peak voltage of 2.5 to 3.0 MV. The peak fields exceed 200kV/cm. All line sections are a series of chromate coated aluminum plates, broken down into short, light weight sections. The design of the plates was meticulously developed using the Electro code for voltage break down, and NISA for mechanical analysis. Electrical losses associated with impedance mismatching and voltage breakdown were carefully reviewed. Changes in the bi-plate gap, surface shapes and electrical path discontinuities (mechanical joints) were precisely calculated to achieve maximum electrical performance and reliability. Several iterations of surface shapes and line gaps were reviewed to achieve the most desirable characteristics possible. Additional criteria required that minimal time and effort be required to remove and install the water-lines. Special hardware was developed to help meet this requirement.
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Garcia, R.J.; Ives, H.C.; Struve, K.W.; Spielman, R.B.; Martin, T.H.; Horry, M.L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Absolute, soft x-ray calorimetry on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories

Description: Simple and reliable x-ray fluence measurements, in addition to time-resolved diagnostics, are needed to understand the physics of hot Z-pinch plasmas. A commercially available laser calorimeter has been modified for measuring soft x-ray fluence from the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The x-ray absorber of this calorimeter is an aluminum disk, attached to a two-dimensional thermopile and surrounded by an isoperibol shroud. The time-integral and the maximum of the thermopile voltage signal are both proportional to the x-ray energy deposited. Data are collected for 90 seconds, and the instrument has, thus far, been used in the 1--25 mJ range. A wider dynamic measuring range for x-ray fluence (energy/area) can be achieved by varying the area of the defining aperture. The calorimeter is calibrated by an electrical substitution method. Calibrations are performed before and after each x-ray experiment on the Z facility. The calibration of the time-integral of the thermopile voltage vs. energy deposited (or the peak of thermopile voltage vs. energy deposited) is linear with zero offset at the 95% confidence level. The irreproducibility of the calibration is <2%, and the imprecision in the measurement of the incident x-ray energy (inferred from signal noise and the calibration) is estimated to be {approximately}0.9 mJ (95% confidence level). The inaccuracy is estimated at {+-}10%, due to correctable systematic errors (e.g., baseline shifts). Comparisons have been made of the calorimeter to time-resolved x-ray diagnostics, e.g., bolometers and XRD (x-ray diode) arrays, by integrating the flux measured by these instruments over time.
Date: May 1, 1998
Creator: Fehl, D.L.; Muron, D.J.; Leeper, R.J.; Chandler, G.A.; Deeney, C. & Spielman, R.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fast resistive bolometry

Description: Resistive bolometry is an accurate, robust, spectrally broadband technique for measuring absolute x-ray fluence and flux. Bolometry is an independent technique for x-ray measurements that is based on a different set of physical properties than other diagnostics such as x-ray diodes, photoconducting detectors, and P-I-N diodes. Bolometers use the temperature-driven change in element resistivity to determine the total deposited energy. The calibration of such a device is based on fundamental material properties and its physical dimensions. The authors describe the use of nickel and gold bolometers to measure x rays generated by high power Z pinches on Sandia`s Saturn and Z accelerators. The Sandia bolometer design described herein has a pulse response of {approximately}1 ns. They describe in detail the fabrication, fielding, and data analysis issues leading to highly accurate x-ray measurements. The fundamental accuracy of resistive bolometry will be discussed.
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Spielman, R.B.; Deeney, C.; Fehl, D.L.; Hanson, D.L.; Keltner, N.R.; McGurn, J.S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Z: A Fast Pulsed Power Generator for Ultra-High Magnetic Field Generation

Description: Advances in fast, pulsed-power technologies have resulted in the development of very high current drivers that have current rise times - 100 ns. The largest such pulsed power drive r today is the new Z accelerator located at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Z is capable of delivering more than 20 MA with a time-to-peak of 105 ns to low inductance (- 1 nH)loads. Such large drivers are capable of directly generating magnetic fields approaching 3 kT in small, 1 -cm3, volumes. In addition to direct field generation, Z can be used to compress an applied, axial seed field with a plasma. Flux compression scheme~: are not new and are, in fact, the basis of all explosive flux-compression generators but we propose the use of plasma armatures rather than solid, conducting armatures. We will present experimental results from the Z accelerator in which magnetic fields - 2 kT are generated and measured with several diagnostics. Issues such as energy loss in solid conductors and dynamic response of current-carrying conductors to very large magnetic fields will be reviewed in context with Z experiments. We will describe planned flux-compression experiments that are expected to create the highest-magnitude uniform-field volumes yet attained in the laboratory.
Date: November 4, 1998
Creator: Asay, J.R.; Bailey, J.E.; Bernard, M.A.; Hall, C.A.; McDaniel, D.H.; Spielman, R.B. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ZX Pulsed-Power Design

Description: ZX is a new z-pinch accelerator planned as the next generation z-pinch driver at SNL, and as an intermediate step towards X-1. It is planned to drive either a single 50 MA z-pinch load, or two 25 to 30 MA z pinches. Three designs for the ZX accelerator are presented. All require 7 to 8 MV at the insulator stack to drive the z-pinch load to implosion in 100 to 120 ns. Two of the designs are based on the Z accelerator, and use water-line technology; a transit-time-isolated water adder, and a water transformer. The third design uses inductive-voltage adders in water. They also describe a low-inductance insulator stack design that helps minimize voltage requirements. This design is evaluated for water and vacuum break-down using JCM, THM, and magnetic-flashover-inhibition criteria.
Date: August 2, 1999
Creator: Corley, J.P.; Johnson, D.L.; McDaniel, D.H.; Spielman, R.B.; Struve, K.W. & Stygar, W.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radiative Properties of High Wire Number Tungsten Arrays with Implosion Times up to 250 ns

Description: High wire number, 25-mm diameter tungsten wire arrays have been imploded on the 8-MA Saturn generator, operating in a long-pulse mode. By varying the mass load from 710 to 6140 ps/cm, implosion times of 130 to 250 ns have been obtained with implosion velocities of 50 to 25 cn-dys, respectively. These z-pinch implosions produced plasmas with millimeter diameters that radiated 600 to 800 kJ of x-rays, with powers of 20 to 49 TW; the corresponding pulse widths were 19 to 7.5 ns, with risetimes ranging from 6.5 to 4.0 ns. These powers and pulse widths are similar to those achieved with 50 ns implosion times on Saturn. Two-dimensional, radiation- magnetohydrodynamic calculations indicate that the imploding shells in these long implosion time experiments are comparable in width to those in the short pulse cases. This can only be due to lower initial perturbations. A heuristic wire array model suggests that the reduced perturbations, in the long pulse cases, may be due to the individual wire merger occurring well before the acceleration of the shell. The experiments and modeling suggest that 150 to 200 ns implosion time z-pinches could be employed for high-power, x-ray source applications.
Date: February 2, 1999
Creator: Beg, F.N.; Coverdale, C.A.; Deeney, C.; Douglas, M.R.; Haines, M.G.; Peterson, D.L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department