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Compression-ignition engine tests of several fuels

Description: The tests reported in this paper were made to devise simple engine tests which would rate fuels as to their comparative value and their suitability for the operating conditions of the individual engine on which the tests are made. Three commercial fuels were used in two test engines having combustion chambers with and without effective air flow. Strictly comparative performance tests gave almost identical results for the three fuels. Analysis of indicator cards allowed a differentiation between fuels on a basis of rates of combustion. The same comparative ratings were obtained by determining the consistent operating range of injection advance angle for the three fuels. The difference in fuels is more pronounced in a quiescent combustion chamber than in one with high-velocity air flow. A fuel is considered suitable for the operating conditions of an engine with a quiescent combustion chamber if it permits the injection of the fuel to be advanced beyond the optimum without exceeding allowable knock or allowable maximum cylinder pressures.
Date: May 1, 1932
Creator: Spanogle, J A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A comparison of several methods of measuring ignition lag in a compression-ignition engine

Description: The ignition lag of a fuel oil in the combustion chamber of a high speed compression-ignition engine was measured by three different methods. The start of injection of the fuel as observed with a Stoborama was taken as the start of the period of ignition lag in all cases. The end of the period of ignition lag was determined by observation of the appearance of incandescence in the combustion chamber, by inspection of a pressure-time card for evidence of pressure rise, and by analysis of the indicator card for evidence of the combustion of a small but definite quantity of fuel. A comparison of the values for ignition lags obtained by these three methods indicates that the appearance of incandescence is later than other evidences of the start of combustion, that visual inspection of a pressure-time diagram gives consistent and usable values with a minimum requirement of time and/or apparatus, and that analysis of the indicator card is not worth while for ignition lag alone.
Date: January 1, 1934
Creator: Spanogle, J A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The N.A.C.A. combustion chamber gas-sampling valve and some preliminary test results

Description: A gas sampling valve of the inertia-operated type was designed for procuring samples of the gases in the combustion chamber of internal combustion engines at identical points in successive cycles so that the analysis of the gas samples thus procured may aid in the study of the process of combustion. The operation of the valve is described. The valve was used to investigate the CO2 content of gases taken from the quiescent combustion chamber of a high speed compression-ignition engine when operating with two different multiple-orifice fuel injection nozzles. An analysis of the gas samples thus obtained shows that the state of quiescence in the combustion chamber is maintained during the combustion of the fuel.
Date: March 1, 1933
Creator: Spanogle, J A & Buckley, E C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance of a compression-ignition engine with a precombustion chamber having high-velocity air flow

Description: Presented here are the results of performance tests made with a single-cylinder, four stroke cycle, compression-ignition engine. These tests were made on a precombustion chamber type of cylinder head designed to have air velocity and tangential air flow in both the chamber and cylinder. The performance was investigated for variable load and engine speed, type of fuel spray, valve opening pressure, injection period and, for the spherical chamber, position of the injection spray relative to the air flow. The pressure variations between the pear-shaped precombustion chamber and the cylinder for motoring and full load conditions were determined with a Farnboro electric indicator. The combustion chamber designs tested gave good mixing of a single compact fuel spray with the air, but did not control the ensuing combustion sufficiently. Relative to each other, the velocity of air flow was too high, the spray dispersion by injection too great, and the metering effect of the cylinder head passage insufficient. The correct relation of these factors is of the utmost importance for engine performance.
Date: October 1, 1931
Creator: Spanogle, J A & Moore, C S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance of a high-speed compression-ignition engine using multiple orifice fuel injection nozzles

Description: This report presents test results obtained at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics during an investigation to determine the relative performance of a single-cylinder, high-speed, compression-ignition engine when using fuel injection valve nozzles with different numbers, sizes, and directions of round orifices. A spring-loaded, automatic injection valve was used, centrally located at the top of a vertical disk-type combustion chamber formed between horizontally opposed inlet and exhaust valves of a 5 inch by 7 inch engine.
Date: June 1, 1930
Creator: Spanogle, J A & Foster, H H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The effectiveness of a double-stem injection valve in controlling combustion in a compression-ignition engine

Description: An investigation was made to determine to what extent the rates of combustion in a compression-ignition engine can be controlled by varying the rates of fuel injection. The tests showed that the double-stem valve operated satisfactorily under all normal injection conditions; the rate of injection has a definite effect on the rate of combustion; the engine performance with the double-stem valve was inferior to that obtained with a single-stem valve; and the control of injection rates permitted by an injection valve of two stages of discharge is not sufficient to effect the desired rates of combustion.
Date: December 1, 1931
Creator: Spanogle, J A & Whitney, E G
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Considerations of air flow in combustion chambers of high-speed compression-ignition engines

Description: The air flow in combustion chambers is divided into three fundamental classes - induced, forced, and residual. A generalized resume is given of the present status of air flow investigations and of the work done at this and other laboratories to determine the direction and velocity of air movement in auxiliary and integral combustion chambers. The effects of air flow on engine performance are mentioned to show that although air flow improves the combustion efficiency, considerable induction, friction, and thermal losses must be guarded against.
Date: April 1, 1932
Creator: Spanogle, J. A. & Moore, C. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A balanced diaphragm type of maximum cylinder pressure indicator

Description: A balanced diaphragm type of maximum cylinder pressure indicator was designed to give results consistent with engine operating conditions. The apparatus consists of a pressure element, a source of controlled high pressure and a neon lamp circuit. The pressure element, which is very compact, permits location of the diaphragm within 1/8 inch of the combustion chamber walls without water cooling. The neon lamp circuit used for indicating contact between the diaphragm and support facilitates the use of the apparatus with multicylinder engines.
Date: December 1, 1930
Creator: Spanogle, J A & Collins, John H , Jr
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Basic requirements of fuel-injection nozzles for quiescent combustion chambers

Description: This report presents test results obtained during an investigation of the performance of a single-cylinder, high-speed, compression-ignition test engine when using multiple-orifice fuel-injection valve nozzles in which the number and the direction of the orifices were varied independently.
Date: June 1, 1931
Creator: Spanogle, J A & Foster, H H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of an impinging-jet fuel-injection valve nozzle

Description: During an investigation to determine the possibilities and limitations of a two-stroke-cycle engine and ignition, it was necessary to develop a fuel injection valve nozzle to produce a disk-shaped, well dispersed spray. Preliminary tests showed that two smooth jets impinging upon each other at an angle of 74 degrees gave a spray with the desired characteristics. Nozzles were built on this basis and, when used in fuel-injection valves, produced a spray that fulfilled the original requirements. The spray is so well dispersed that it can be carried along with an air stream of comparatively low velocity or entrained with the fuel jet from a round-hole orifice. The characteristics of the spray from an impinging-jet nozzle limits its application to situations where wide dispersion is required by the conditions in the engine cylinder and the combustion chamber.
Date: April 1, 1931
Creator: Spanogle, J A & Hemmeter, G H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A description and test results of a spark-ignition and a compression-ignition 2-stroke-cycle engine

Description: This report presents performance results of air cooled and water-cooled engines. The results obtained were sufficiently promising to warrant further investigation with fuel injection and spark ignition, with the same arrangement of inlet ports and exhaust valves at the bottom of the cylinder and the exhaust gases discharged through two poppet valves in the cylinder head. The displacement of the engine was 118 cubic inches. Optimum performance was obtained with the inlet air directed into the cylinder at an angle of 20 degrees to the radial.
Date: January 1, 1935
Creator: Spanogle, J A & Whitney, E G
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Increasing the air charge and scavenging the clearance volume of a compression-ignition engine

Description: The object of the investigation presented in this report was to determine the effects of increasing the air charge and scavenging the clearance volume of a 4-stroke-cycle compression-ignition engine having a vertical-disk form combustion chamber. Boosting the inlet-air pressure with normal valve timing increased the indicated engine power in proportion to the additional air inducted and resulted in smoother engine operation with less combustion shock. Scavenging the clearance volume by using a valve overlap of 145 degrees and an inlet-air boost pressure of approximately 2 1/2 inches of mercury produced a net increase in performance for clear exhaust operation of 33 percent over that obtained with normal valve timing and the same boost pressure. The improved combustion characteristics result in lower specific fuel consumption, and a clearer exhaust.
Date: January 1, 1934
Creator: Spanogle, J A; Hicks, C W & Foster, H H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department