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Experimental investigation of the drag of 30 degree, 60 degree, and 90 degree cone cylinders at Mach numbers between 1.5 and 8.2

Description: Report presenting the total drag coefficients of 60 degree cone cylinders of fineness ratio 2.07 measured in free flight from Mach numbers of 1.5 to 8.2. Results regarding the smooth 60 degree cone cylinder, rifled models, and discontinuity lines in the shadowgraph pictures are provided.
Date: April 25, 1952
Creator: Seiff, Alvin & Sommer, Simon C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of the drag of various axially symmetric nose shapes of fineness ratio 3 for Mach numbers from 1.24 to 7.4

Description: Experimental drag measurements at zero angle of attack for various theoretical minimum drag nose shapes, hemispherically blunted cones, and other more common profiles of fineness ratios of about 3 are compared with theoretical results for a Mach number and Reynolds number range of 1.24 to 7.4 and 1.0 x 10 to the 6th power to 7.5 x 10 to the 6th power (based on body length), respectively. The results of experimental pressure-distribution measurements are used for the development of an empirical expression for predicting the pressure drag of hemispherically blunted cones.
Date: August 28, 1952
Creator: Perkins, Edward W.; Jorgensen, Leland H. & Sommer, Simon C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Some experiments at high supersonic speeds on the aerodynamic and boundary-layer transition characteristics of high-drag bodies of revolution

Description: Report presenting measurements made at Mach numbers of 4.0 and 8.3 of the drag, static stability, damping in pitch, and boundary-layer transition characteristics of several high-drag bodies of revolution that might be used for high-speed entry into the earth's atmosphere. The static stability was found to be high with centers of pressure as far aft as 91 percent of the length from the nose. Results regarding the force and moment data, boundary-layer transition, a comparison of roughness height to boundary-layer thickness, other causes of boundary-layer instability, and Reynolds numbers for high-speed entry into the Earth's atmosphere are provided.
Date: January 14, 1957
Creator: Seiff, Alvin; Sommer, Simon C. & Canning, Thomas N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Free-flight measurements of turbulent-boundary-layer skin friction in the presence of severe aerodynamic heating at Mach numbers from 2.8 to 7.0

Description: Report presenting experimental measurements of average skin friction of the turbulent boundary layer on free-flying, hollow-cylinder models at four Mach numbers at conditions of high rates of heat transfer. The data of the investigation indicates that increasing skin-friction ratio with increasing heat-transfer rates will persist up to Mach numbers as high as 7. Results regarding skin-friction ratio and the T' method for evaluating skin friction are provided.
Date: March 1955
Creator: Sommer, Simon C. & Short, Barbara J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of boundary-layer transition on flat-faced bodies of revolution at high supersonic speeds

Description: An experimental investigation was carried out to determine the boundary-layer transition characteristics of bodies of revolution with flat and nearly flat faces. Shadowgraphs indicated that the boundary layer remained laminar on the front faces and was turbulent only on the sides. The tests also yielded information on the total drag coefficients and static longitudinal stability of the models.
Date: June 7, 1957
Creator: Canning, Thomas N. & Sommer, Simon C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The effect of bluntness on the drag of spherical-tipped truncated cones of fineness ratio 3 at Mach numbers 1.2 to 7.4

Description: Report presenting an investigation of the drag of spherically blunted conical models of fineness ratio 3 at a range of Mach and Reynolds numbers. Results of the tests showed that slightly blunted models had less drag than cones of the same fineness ratio through the Mach number range. Results regarding the total drag, wave drag, and viscous effects are provided.
Date: April 25, 1952
Creator: Sommer, Simon C. & Stark, James A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department