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History of Met Lab Section C-I, May 1943 to April 1944

Description: This is part of a history of the research work of Seaborg and associates in the University of Chicago Metallurgical Laboratory, Chemistry Section C-I. The work was concerned with the development of chemical procedures for the extraction of plutonium, for the purification of plutonium, and for research on the isotopes of other heavy elements including other transuranium elements. The style of the history is that of a diary with footnotes giving additional information. (DLC)
Date: May 1, 1978
Creator: Seaborg, G.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nuclear fission and the transuranium elements

Description: Many of the transuranium elements are produced and isolated in large quantities through the use of neutrons furnished by nuclear fission reactions: plutonium (atomic number 94) in ton quantities; neptunium (93), americium (95), and curium (96) in kilogram quantities; berkelium (97) in 100 milligram quantities; californium (98) in gram quantities; and einsteinium (99) in milligram quantities. Transuranium isotopes have found many practical applications---as nuclear fuel for the large-scale generation of electricity, as compact, long-lived power sources for use in space exploration, as means for diagnosis and treatment in the medical area, and as tools in numerous industrial processes. Of particular interest is the unusual chemistry and impact of these heaviest elements on the periodic table. This account will feature these aspects. 9 refs., 5 figs.
Date: February 1, 1989
Creator: Seaborg, G.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nuclear reactions and synthesis of new transuranium species

Description: In this short review, I shall describe the special aspects of heavy ion nuclear reaction mechanisms operative in the transuranium region, the role of new techniques, possible nuclear reactions for the production of additional transuranium elements and nuclear species and the importance of work in this region for the development of nuclear models and theoretical concepts. This discussion should make it clear that a continuing supply of leements and isotopes, some fo them relatively short-lived, produced by the HFIR-TRU facilities, will be a requirement for future synthesis of new elements and isotopes.
Date: January 1, 1983
Creator: Seaborg, G.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

History of Met Lab Section C-I, May 1945 to May 1946

Description: This is the final volume of a history of the research work of Seaborg and associates in the University of Chicago Metallurgical Laboratory, Chemistry Section C-1. The work was concerned with the development of chemical procedures for the extraction of plutonium, for the purification of plutonium and, in the later phases, for research on the isotopes of other heavy elements including other transuranium elements. The style of the history is that of a diary with footnotes giving additional information.
Date: June 1, 1980
Creator: Seaborg, G.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recent research on the heavy transuranium elements

Description: This review is devoted to recent research (performed in the 1980s) on the heavy members of the group, defined as the transcurium elements (with a few references to related work on lighter elements). It covers the discovery of the three heaviest elements, the discovery of new isotopes, investigation of interesting decay properties of some previously known isotopes, investigations of some heavy ion reaction mechanisms in this region, and recent investigations of nuclear and chemical properties. It is not exhaustive in its coverage, is necessarily succinct, and inevitably places emphasis on those aspects with which the author is most familiar. 92 refs., 3 figs.
Date: September 1, 1988
Creator: Seaborg, G.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pioneering the nuclear age

Description: This paper reviews the historical aspects of nuclear physics. The scientific aspects of the early transuranium elements are discussed and arms control measures are reviewed. 11 refs., 14 figs. (LSP)
Date: September 1, 1988
Creator: Seaborg, G.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Symposium commemorating the 25th anniversary of the discovery of mendelevium

Description: The Symposium honoring the 25th Anniversary of the discovery of mendelevium was held at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on March 28, 1980. The following three papers were presented: Chemical Properties of Mendelevium; Nuclear Properties of Mendelevium; and Radioactive Decay of Md Isotopes. Besides these papers there were introductory remarks, reminiscences, and concluding remarks.
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Seaborg, G.T. (ed.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

History of MET Lab Section C-I, April 1942--April 1943

Description: A day-to-day account of the work done at the University of Chicago Metallurgical Laboratory from April 1942 to April 1943 is given. The work concerned the development of chemical procedures for the extraction of plutonium, for the purification of plutonium, and, in the later phases, for research on the isotopes of other heavy elements including other transuranium elements. (LK)
Date: February 1, 1977
Creator: Seaborg, G. T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The 40th AAAS Gordon Conference on nuclear chemistry

Description: I am pleased to speak at the Fortieth Gordon Conference on Nuclear Chemistry. I served as Chairman of the first Gordon Conference on Nuclear Chemistry held June 23--27, 1952, at New Hampton, New Hampshire. In my remarks, during which I shall quote from my journal, I shall describe some of the background leading up to the first Gordon Conference on Nuclear Chemistry and my attendance at the first seven Gordon Conferences during the period 1952 through 1958. I shall also quote my description of my appearance as the featured speaker at the Silver Anniversary of the Gordon Research Conferences on December 27, 1956 held at the Commodore Hotel in New York City. I shall begin with reference to my participation in the predecessor to the Gordon Conferences, the Gibson Island Research Conferences 45 years ago, on Thursday, June 20, 1946, as a speaker. This was 15 years after the start of these conferences in 1931. Neil Gordon played a leading role in these conferences, which were named (in 1948) in his honor -- the Gordon Research Conferences -- soon after they were moved to Colby Junior College, New London, New Hampshire in 1947. W. George Parks became Director in 1947, Alexander Cruickshank became Assistant Director in 1947 and Director in 1968.
Date: June 27, 1991
Creator: Seaborg, G.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Atomic energy as an humane endeavor: Retrospective on its development

Description: This report is a speech delivered in Tokyo, Japan, by the author. It covers the historical aspects of atomic energy, from the pre-fission days until present. Such pioneer experiments conducted by O. Hahn, L. Meitner, and F. Strassmann to describe barium isotopes as the result of bombardment of uranium with neutrons are discussed. The author also discussed in detail the pre-war nuclear research at Berkeley, a leading center of nuclear research. Such important events as the synthesis and identification of cobalt-60, iodine-131, and technetium-99m are also discussed. The author discussed the nuclear power as a source of electricity and the perspective on the future of nuclear power. 32 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Seaborg, G.T. & Stahlkopf, K.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Symposium commemorating the 25th anniversary of elements 99 and 100. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab. , January 23, 1978]

Description: Separate abstracts were prepared for five of the contributions to this symposium. The four remaining ones have already been cited in ERA and may be located by reference as the entry CONF-780134-- in the Report Number Index. (RWR)
Date: April 1, 1979
Creator: Seaborg, G.T. & Webb, C. (eds.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National service with ten presidents of the United States

Description: This document is a biography of the renowned nuclear chemist, Glenn T. Seaborg. It covers his career over the presidential terms of Franklin Roosevelt through George Bush. It contains many personnel accounts of historic events. Photographs of Seaborg and the various Presidents are presented.
Date: October 1, 1992
Creator: Seaborg, G.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National service with ten presidents of the United States

Description: This document is a biography of the renowned nuclear chemist, Glenn T. Seaborg. It covers his career over the presidential terms of Franklin Roosevelt through George Bush. It contains many personnel accounts of historic events. Photographs of Seaborg and the various Presidents are presented.
Date: October 1, 1992
Creator: Seaborg, G. T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electronic Structure of the Heaviest Elements

Description: All of the available evidence leads to the view that the 5f electron shell is being filled in the heaviest elements giving rise to a transition series which begins with actinium in the same sense that the rare earth or 'lanthanide' series begins with lanthanum. Such an 'actinide' series is suggested on the basis of evidence in the following lines: (1) chemical properties, (2) absorption spectra in aqueous solution and crystals, (3) crystallographic structure data, (4) magnetic susceptibility data and (5) spectroscopic data. The salient point is that the characteristic oxidation state (i.e., the oxidation state exhibited by the member containing seven 5f and presumably also by the member containing fourteen 5f electrons, curium and element 103) is the III state, and the group is placed in the periodic table on this basis. The data also make it possible to give a suggested table of electronic configurations of the ground state of the gaseous atom for each of the elements from actinium to curium inclusive.
Date: July 14, 1948
Creator: Seaborg, G.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evolution of federal support of science

Description: Evolution of Federal Support of Science'' is Dr. G. T. Seaborg's speech presented at the symposium on the Establishment of Research Support Agencies, held on August 30, 1990, in Washington, DC. He gives a brief history on the development of nuclear energy from the discovery of fission in 1938 to the completion of uranium bombs in 1944. He also covered the scientific activities during the war, which included the establishment of National Defense Research Committee, the Office of Scientific Research and Development, and the Atomic Energy Act. He discussed the debate between the little science'' and the big science,'' which requires hundreds of billions of dollars, such as the superconducting super collider. Dr. Seaborg believes that our country can afford to support both research activities, if we could reduce the expenses of military expansion. 22 figs.
Date: August 1, 1990
Creator: Seaborg, G.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cooperation between the US and the USSR in the peaceful uses of atomic energy

Description: The decade of the 1960's saw a marked expansion of cooperation between the United States and the Soviet Union for the peaceful uses of atomic energy. In my opinion, this development constituted one of the most encouraging elements in the international scene. Until 1955 contacts between American and Soviet nuclear scientists were virtually nonexistent, as indeed (after World War II) were US-USSR contacts in other fields except as required in formal intergovernmental relations. Then, in July 1955, the discussions of the Heads of Government meeting in Geneva led to the declaration of a policy with the following aims: to lower the barriers which now impede the interchange of information and ideas between our peoples; to lower the barriers which now impede the opportunities of people to travel anywhere in the world for peaceful, friendly purposes, so that all will have a chance to know each other face to face; and to create conditions which will encourage nations to increase the exchange of peaceful goods throughout the world. 8 figs.
Date: October 1, 1989
Creator: Seaborg, G.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department