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IPNS enriched uranium booster target

Description: Since startup in 1981, IPNS has operated on a fully depleted /sup 238/U target. With the booster as in the present system, high energy protons accelerated to 450 MeV by the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron are directed at the target and by mechanisms of spallation and fission of the uranium, produce fast neutrons. The neutrons from the target pass into adjacent moderator where they slow down to energies useful for spectroscopy. The target cooling systems and monitoring systems have operated very reliably and safely during this period. To provide higher neutron intensity, we have developed plans for an enriched uranium (booster) target. HETC-VIM calculations indicate that the target will produce approx.90 kW of heat, with a nominal x5 gain (k/sub eff/ = 0.80). The neutron beam intensity gain will be a factor of approx.3. Thermal-hydraulic and heat transport calculations indicate that approx.1/2 in. thick /sup 235/U discs are subject to about the same temperatures as the present /sup 238/U 1 in. thick discs. The coolant will be light demineralized water (H/sub 2/O) and the coolant flow rate must be doubled. The broadening of the fast neutron pulse width should not seriously affect the neutron scattering experiments. Delayed neutrons will appear at a level about 3% of the total (currently approx.0.5%). This may affect backgrounds in some experiments, so that we are assessing measures to control and correct for this (e.g., beam tube choppers). Safety analyses and neutronic calculations are nearing completion. Construction of the /sup 235/U discs at the ORNL Y-12 facility is scheduled to begin late 1985. The completion of the booster target and operation are scheduled for late 1986. No enriched uranium target assembly operating at the projected power level now exists in the world. This effort thus represents an important technological experiment as well as being a ''flux ...
Date: January 1, 1985
Creator: Schulke, A.W. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Utilization of the intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory for neutron activation analysis

Description: The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) neutron scattering facility (NSF) has been investigated for its applicability to neutron activation analysis. A polyethylene insert has been added to the vertical hole VT3 which enhances the thermal neutron flux by a factor of two. The neutron spectral distribution at this position has been measured by the multiple-foil technique which utilized 28 activation reactions and the STAYSL computer code. The validity of this spectral measurement was tested by two irradiations of National Bureau of Standards SRM-1571 (orchard leaves), SRM-1575 (pine needles), and SRM-1645 (river sediment). The average thermal neutron flux for these irradiations normalized to 10 ..mu..amp proton beam is 4.0 x 10/sup 11/ n/cm/sup 2/-s. Concentrations of nine trace elements in each of these SRMs have been determined by gamma-ray spectrometry. Agreement of measured values to certified values is demonstrated to be within experiment error.
Date: January 1, 1983
Creator: Heinrich, R.R.; Greenwood, L.R.; Popek, R.J. & Schulke, A.W. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Status of the intense pulsed neutron source

Description: Fortunately in spite of some premature reports of its impending demise, IPNS has passed the fourth anniversary of the first delivery of protons to the targets (May 5, 1981) and is approaching the fourth anniversary of its operation as a scattering facility (August 4, 1981). On June 10, 1984, the RCS delivered its one billionth pulse to the IPNS target - the total number of protons delivered to the targets amounted then to 75 stp cm/sup 3/ of H/sub 2/ gas. Since startup IPNS has improved steadily in terms of the performance of the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron, the source and its moderators and the scattering instruments, and a substantial and productive user program has evolved. This report summarizes the current status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source at Argonne National Laboratory. We include reference to recent accelerator operating experience, neutron facility operating experience, improvements to these systems, design work on the ASPUN high-current facility, booster target design, the new solid methane moderator, characterization of the room temperature moderators, and provide some examples of recent results from several of the spectrometers.
Date: January 1, 1985
Creator: Carpenter, J.M.; Brown, B.S.; Kustom, R.L.; Lander, G.H.; Potts, C.W.; Schulke, A.W. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

IPNS grooved, solid methane moderator

Description: There are two motives for using cold moderators in pulsed neutron sources, to provide higher fluxes of long-wavelength neutrons, and to extend the epithermal range with its short pulse structure to lower energies. For both these purposes solid methane, operated at the lowest possible temperatures, is the best material we know of. Two problems accompany the use of solid methane in high power sources, namely heat transport in view of the low thermal conductivity of solid methane, and deterioration due to radiation damage. We have designed a system suitable to operate in IPNS, subject to nuclear heating of about 25 W, which incorporates an aluminum foam matrix to conduct the heat from within the moderator. We report the results of the first few months' operation and of a few tests that we have performed.
Date: January 1, 1985
Creator: Carpenter, J.M.; Schulke, A.W.; Scott, T.L.; Wozniak, D.G.; Benson, B.E. & Leyda, B.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Status of the intense pulsed neutron source

Description: IPNS is not unique in having concerns about the level of funding, and the future looks good despite these concerns. This report details the progress made at IPNS during the last two years. Other papers in these proceedings discuss in detail the status of the enriched uranium Booster target, the two instruments that are under construction, GLAD and POSY II, and a proposal for research on an Advanced Pulsed Neutron Source (ASPUN) that has been submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE). Further details on IPNS are available in the IPNS Progress Report 1987--1988, available by writing the IPNS Division Office. 9 refs., 3 tabs.
Date: January 1, 1988
Creator: Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Crawford, R.K.; Rauchas, A.V.; Schulke, A.W. & Worlton, T.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Intense pulsed neutron source status report

Description: The status and future plans of IPNS will be reviewed. At the celebration of our 10th anniversary in 7 months, IPNS will have performed over 2000 experiments and has over 230 scientists visiting IPNS annually. Plans for a new spallation source concept using a fixed field alternating gradient synchrotron will be presented.
Date: January 1, 1990
Creator: Brown, B.S.; Bohringer, D.E.; Brumwell, F.R.; Carpenter, J.M.; Crawford, R.K.; Rauchas, A.V. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Progress on the IPNS Enriched Uranium Booster Target

Description: We describe the Enriched Uranium Booster Target designed for use in Argonne's Intense Pulsed Neutron Source. This report contains a general description of the system, and descriptions of the thermal-hydraulic and loss-of-coolant accident analyses, of the neutronic, criticality and power density calculations, of the assessment of radiation and thermal cycling growth, and of the disk fabrication methods. We also describe the calculations of radionuclide buildup and the related hazards analysis and our calculations of the temperature and stress profiles in the disks, and briefly allude to considerations of security and safeguards.
Date: September 1, 1986
Creator: Knox, A E; Carpenter, J M; Bailey, J L; Armani, R J; Blomquist, R N; Brown, B S et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department