24 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

IKNO, a user facility for coherent terahertz and UV synchrotron radiation

Description: IKNO (Innovation and KNOwledge) is a proposal for a multi-user facility based on an electron storage ring optimized for the generation of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency range, and of broadband incoherent synchrotron radiation (SR) ranging from the IR to the VUV. IKNO can be operated in an ultra-stable CSR mode with photon flux in the terahertz frequency region up to nine orders of magnitude higher than in existing 3rd generation light sources. Simultaneously to the CSR operation, broadband incoherent SR up to VUV frequencies is available at the beamline ports. The main characteristics of the IKNO storage and its performance in terms of CSR and incoherent SR are described in this paper. The proposed location for the infrastructure facility is in Sardinia, Italy.
Date: April 26, 2008
Creator: Sannibale, Fernando; Marcelli, Augusto & Innocenzi, Plinio
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CIRCE, the Proposed Coherent Infrared Center at the LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory

Description: At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we are proposing the construction of CIRCE (Coherent InfraRed Center), a ring-based photon source completely optimized for the generation of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency range [1]. CIRCE exploits the full complement of the CSR-production mechanisms presently available for obtaining top performance, including a photon flux exceeding by more than nine orders of magnitude that of existing ''conventional'' broadband terahertz sources.
Date: July 12, 2005
Creator: Byrd, John M.; Martin, Michael M. & Sannibale, Fernando
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proposal for a High-Brightness Pulsed Electron Source

Description: We propose a novel scheme for a high-brightness pulsedelectron source, which has the potential for many useful applications inelectron microscopy, inverse photo-emission, low energy electronscattering experiments, and electron holography. A description of theproposed scheme is presented.
Date: March 15, 2006
Creator: Zolotorev, Max; Commins, Eugene D.; Heifets, Sam & Sannibale,Fernando
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lattice Studies for CIRCE (Coherent InfraRed Center) at the ALS

Description: CIRCE (Coherent InfraRed Center) at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL), is a proposal for a new electron storage ring optimized for the generation of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency range. One of the main requirement for this special mode of operation is the capability of the ring of operating at small momentum compaction values. In this regime, the longitudinal dynamics becomes strongly nonlinear and an accurate control of the higher order energy dependent terms of the momentum compaction is necessary. The lattice for CIRCE allows controlling the seterms up to the third order. The paper describes the lattice and presents the calculated performances in terms of momentum acceptance, dynamic aperture , lifetime and momentum compaction tune capabilities.
Date: June 29, 2004
Creator: Nishimura, Hiroshi; Robin, David; Sannibale, Fernando & Wan, Weishi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ABSOLUTE BUNCH LENGTH MEASUREMENTS AT THE ALS BY INCOHERENTSYNCHROTRON RADIATION FLUCTUATION ANALYSIS

Description: By analysing the pulse to pulse intensity fluctuations ofthe radiation emitted by a charge particle in the incoherent part of thespectrum, it is possible to extract information about the spatialdistribution of the beam. At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of theLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we have developed and tested asimple scheme based on this principle that allows for the absolutemeasurement of the bunch length. A description of the method and theexperimental results are presented.
Date: June 22, 2007
Creator: Sannibale, Fernando; Zolotorev, Max S.; Filippetto, Daniele & Stupakov, Gennady V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A second beam-diagnostic beamline for the advanced lightsource

Description: A second beamline, BL 7.2, completely dedicated to beam diagnostics is being installed at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). The design has been optimized for the measurement of the momentum spread and emittance of the stored beam in combination with the existing diagnostic beamline, BL 3.1. A detailed analysis of the experimental error has allowed the definition of the system parameters. The obtained requirements found a good matching with a simple and reliable system based on the detection of X-ray synchrotron radiation (SR) through a pinhole system. The actual beamline, which also includes a port for visible and infrared SR as well as an X-ray beam position monitor (BPM), is mainly based on the design of two similar diagnostic beamlines at BESSY II. This approach allowed a significant saving in time, cost and engineering effort. The design criteria, including a summary of the experimental error analysis, as well as a brief description of the beamline are presented.
Date: May 1, 2003
Creator: Sannibale, Fernando; Baum, Dennis; Kelez, Nicholas; Scarvie, Tom & Holldack, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A MODEL FOR PRODUCING STABLE, BROADBAND TERAHERTZ COHERENT SYNCHROTRONRADIATION IN STORAGE RINGS

Description: We present a model for producing stable broadband coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency region in an electron storage ring. The model includes distortion of bunch shape from the synchrotron radiation (SR), enhancing higher frequency coherent emission and limits to stable emission due to a microbunching instability excited by the SR. We use this model to optimize the performance of a source for CSR emission.
Date: June 13, 2003
Creator: Sannibale, Fernando; Byrd, John M.; Loftsdottir, Agusta; Martin, MichaelC. & Venturini, Marco
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Diagnostic Systems Plan for the Advanced Light Source Top-OffUpgrade

Description: The Advanced Light Source (ALS) will soon be upgraded to enable top-off operations [1], in which electrons are quasi-continuously injected to produce constant stored beam current. The upgrade is structured in two phases. First, we will upgrade our injector from 1.5 GeV to 1.9 GeV to allow full energy injection and will start top-off operations. In the second phase, we will upgrade the Booster Ring (BR) with a bunch cleaning system to allow high bunch purity top-off injection. A diagnostics upgrade will be crucial for success in both phases of the top-off project, and our plan for it is described in this paper. New booster ring diagnostics will include updated beam position monitor (BPM) electronics, a tune monitoring system, and a new scraper. Two new synchrotron light monitors and a beam stop will be added to the booster-to-storage ring transfer line (BTS), and all the existing beam current monitors along the accelerator chain will be integrated into a single injection efficiency monitoring application. A dedicated bunch purity monitor will be installed in the storage ring (SR). Together, these diagnostic upgrades will enable smooth commissioning of the full energy injector and a quick transition to high quality top-off operation at the ALS.
Date: May 10, 2005
Creator: Barry, Walter; Chin, Mike; Robin, David; Sannibale, Fernando; Scarvie, Tom & Steier, Christoph
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a High-Brightness VHF Electron Source at LBNL

Description: Currently proposed ERL and high average power FEL projects require electron beam sources that can generate {approx}1nC bunch charges at high repetition rates. Many proposed sources are based around either high voltage DC or microwave RF guns, each with its particular set of technological limits and system complications. We propose a novel solution that greatly diminishes high voltage breakdown issues while also decreasing peak RF power requirements in a warm copper device, and that has the benefit of mapping the rf oscillation period much more closely to the required beam repetition rate. We present the initial RF and mechanical design for a 750kV electron source and beam injection system utilizing a gun resonant in the VHF band. Beam dynamics simulations demonstrate excellent beam quality preservation and transport.
Date: July 10, 2007
Creator: Lidia, Steven M.; Sannibale, Fernando; Staples, John W.; Virostek, Steve P. & Wells, Russell P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Beam Measurements and Upgrade at BL 7.2, the Second DiagnosticsBeamline of the Advanced Light Source

Description: Beamline 7.2 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at theLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is a beam diagnostics systemthat uses the synchrotron radiation emitted by a dipole magnet. Itconsists of two branches; in the first one the x-ray portion of theradiation is used in a pinhole camera system for measuring the transverseprofile of the beam. The second branch is equipped with an x-ray beamposition monitor (BPM) and with a multipurpose port where the visible andthe far-infrared part of the radiation can be used for variousapplications such as bunch length measurements and IR coherentsynchrotron radiation experiments. The pinhole system has been operatingsuccessfully since the end of 2003. The installation of the second branchhas been completed recently and the results of its commissioning arepresented in this paper together with examples of beam measurementsperformed at BL 7.2.
Date: May 12, 2005
Creator: Scarvie, Tom; Sannibale, Fernando; Biocca, Alan; Kelez, Nicholas; Martin, Michael C.; Nishimura, Toshiro et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Absolute bunch length measurements by incoherent radiation fluctuation analysis

Description: By analyzing the pulse to pulse intensity fluctuations of the radiation emitted by a charge particle in the incoherent part of the spectrum, it is possible to extract information about the spatial distribution of the beam. At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we have developed and successfully tested a simple scheme based on this principle that allows for the absolute measurement of the rms bunch length. A description of the method and the experimental results are presented.
Date: September 29, 2008
Creator: Sannibale, Fernando; Stupakov, Gennady; Zolotorev, Max; Filippetto, Daniele & Jagerhofer, Lukas
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tailored terahertz pulses from a laser-modulated electronbeam

Description: Interaction of an electron beam with a femtosecond laserpulseco-propagating through a wiggler modulates the electronenergieswithin a short slice of the electron bunch comparable with the durationof the laser pulse (Figure 1). Propagating around an electron storagering, this bunch develops a longitudinal density perturbation due to thedispersion of electron trajectories. Figure 1 shows how this createsfemtosecond electron bunch wings which are used for femtosecond x-raylight. In addition, this density perturbation emits temporally andspatially coherent tera-hertz pulses whichare inherently synchronized tothe modulating laser. This gives us a new way to study coherentsynchrotron radaition, and creates an opportunity for tuning the THzemmission specifically for the needs of a given experiment.
Date: July 19, 2005
Creator: Martin, Michael C.; Byrd, John; Hao, Zhao; Robin, David; Sannibale,Fernando; Schoenlein, Robert W. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Commissioning of BL 7.2, the new diagnostic beam line at the ALS

Description: BL 7.2 is a new beamline at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) dedicated to electron beam diagnostics. The system, which is basically a hard x-ray pinhole camera, was installed in the storage ring in August 2003 and commissioning with the ALS electron beam followed immediately after. In this paper the commissioning results are presented together with the description of the relevant measurements performed for the beamline characterization.
Date: June 29, 2004
Creator: Sannibale, Fernando; Baum, Dennis; Biocca, Alan; Kelez, Nicholas; Nishimura, Toshiro; Scarvie, Tom et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and energy recovery linac applications

Description: Currently proposed energy recovery linac and high average power free electron laser projects require electron beam sources that can generate up to {approx} 1 nC bunch charges with less than 1 mmmrad normalized emittance at high repetition rates (greater than {approx} 1 MHz). Proposed sources are based around either high voltage DC or microwave RF guns, each with its particular set of technological limits and system complications. We propose an approach for a gun fully based on mature RF and mechanical technology that greatly diminishes many of such complications. The concepts for such a source as well as the present RF and mechanical design are described. Simulations that demonstrate the beam quality preservation and transport capability of an injector scheme based on such a gun are also presented.
Date: October 8, 2008
Creator: Baptiste, Kenneth; Corlett, John; Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Lidia, Steven; Qiang, Ji; Sannibale, Fernando et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FIRST EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM DEGAS, THE QUANTUM LIMITED BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON SOURCE

Description: The construction of DEGAS (DEGenerate Advanced Source), a proof of principle for a quantum limited brightness electron source, has been completed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The commissioning and the characterization of this source, designed to generate coherent single electron 'bunches' with brightness approaching the quantum limit at a repetition rate of few MHz, has been started. In this paper the first experimental results are described.
Date: June 23, 2008
Creator: Zolotorev, Max S.; Commins, Eugene D.; Oneill, James; Sannibale, Fernando; Tremsin, Anton & Wan, Weishi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stable CSR in storage rings: A model

Description: A comprehensive historical view of the work done on coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in storage rings is given in reference [1]. Here we want just to point out that even if the issue of CSR in storage rings was already discussed over 50 years ago, it is only recently that a considerable number of observations have been reported. In fact, intense bursts of coherent synchrotron radiation with a stochastic character were measured in the terahertz frequency range, at several synchrotron light source storage rings [2-8]. It has been shown [8-11], that this bursting emission of CSR is associated with a single bunch instability, usually referred as microbunching instability (MBI), driven by the fields of the synchrotron radiation emitted by the bunch itself. Of remarkably different characteristics was the CSR emission observed at BESSY II in Berlin, when the storage ring was tuned into a special low momentum compaction mode [12, 13]. In fact, the emitted radiation was not the quasi-random bursting observed in the other machines, but a powerful and stable flux of broadband CSR in the terahertz range. This was an important result, because it experimentally demonstrated the concrete possibility of constructing a stable broadband source with extremely high power in the terahertz region. Since the publication of the first successful experiment using the ring as a CSR source [14], BESSY II has regular scheduled user s shifts dedicated to CSR experiments. At the present time, several other laboratories are investigating the possibility of a CSR mode of operation [15-17] and a design for a new ring optimized for CSR is at an advanced stage [18]. In what follows, we describe a model that first accounts for the BESSY II observations and then indicates that the special case of BESSY II is actually quite general and typical when relativistic ...
Date: January 3, 2005
Creator: Sannibale, Fernando; Byrd, John M.; Loftsdottir, Agusta; Venturini, Marco; Abo-Bakr, Michael; Feikes, Jorge et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Ultra-Bright Pulsed Electron Beam with Low Longitudinal Emittance

Description: Most existing electron sources extract electrons from conductors. Since the actual temperature inside the conductor is much less than the Fermi temperature of the conduction electrons, the electron degeneracy ({delta}{sub f}) is close to 1, the maximum allowed by the Pauli exclusion principle. However, during extraction several factors conspire together to reduce {delta}{sub f} many orders of magnitude, limiting the achieved values to approx 10{sup -5}. A new concept is described for building a novel electron source designed to produce a pulsed beam with {delta}{sub f} approx 2 10{sup -3} and longitudinal emittance four orders of magnitude smaller than currently achieved values. This high brightness, low longitudinal emittance regime enables a wide range of novel applications that utilize angstrom-scale spatial resolution and eV-scale energy resolution. The current state of a proof-of-principle experiment conducted at LBNL is also described.
Date: May 1, 2005
Creator: Zolotorev, Max; Commins, Eugene D.; Denes, P.; Heifets, Samuel; Hussain, Zahid; Lebedev, Gennnadi V. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Terahertz Coherent Synchrotron Radiation from Femtosecond LaserModulation of the Electron Beam at the Advanced Light Source

Description: At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), the ''femtoslicing'' beamline is in operation since 1999 for the production of x-ray synchrotron radiation pulses with femtosecond duration. The mechanism used for generating the short x-ray pulses induces at the same time temporary structures in the electron bunch longitudinal distribution with very short characteristic length. Such structures emit intense coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency range. These CSR pulses were first observed at the ALS, and the measurement of their intensity is now routinely used as a diagnostics for the tune-up of the femtoslicing x-ray experiments. At the same time, these CSR pulses synchronous with the modulating laser, represent a potential source of terahertz radiation with very interesting features. Several measurements have been performed for their characterization and in this paper we present an updated description of the experimental results and of their interpretation. In particular, we include more data on the interesting interaction, previously observed at the ALS, between the slicing and the microbunching instability (MBI), where under particular circumstances, the slicing seems to trigger the onset of the instability.
Date: May 1, 2005
Creator: Byrd, John M.; Hao, Zhao; Martin, Michael C.; Robin, David S.; Sannibale, Fernando; Schoenlein, Robert W. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Scientific Needs for Future X-ray Sources in the U.S. -- A White Paper

Description: Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving heath, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects. The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons and spins, x rays have proved especially valuable.
Date: October 16, 2008
Creator: Falcone, Roger; Stohr, Joachim; Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Galayda, John; Hastings, Jerry et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RECENT BEAM MEASUREMENTS AND NEW INSTRUMENTATION AT THE ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE

Description: The Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley was the first of the soft x-ray third generation light source ever built, and since 1993 has been in continuous and successful operation serving a large community of users in the VUV and soft x-ray community. During these years the storage ring underwent through several important upgrades that allowed maintaining the performance of this veteran facility at the forefront. The ALS beam diagnostics and instrumentation have followed a similar path of innovation and upgrade and nowadays include most of the modem and last generation devices and technologies that are commercially available and used in the recently constructed third generation light sources. In this paper we will not focus on such already widely known systems, but we will concentrate our effort in the description of some measurements techniques, instrumentation and diagnostic systems specifically developed at the ALS and used during the last few years.
Date: May 5, 2008
Creator: Sannibale, Fernando; Baptiste, Kenneth; Barry, Walter; Chin, Michael; Filippetto, Daniele; Jaegerhofer, Lukas et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Science and Technology of Future Light Sources: A White Paper

Description: Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects (Figure 1.1). The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation ...
Date: February 3, 2009
Creator: Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CIRCE, the Coherent Infrared Center at the ALS

Description: CIRCE (Coherent InfraRed CEnter) is a proposal for a new electron storage ring to be built at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The ring design is optimized for the generation of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency range. Among others, CIRCE operation includes three interesting CSR modes: ultra stable, femtosecond laser slicing and broadband bursting. CSR allows CIRCE to generate an extremely high flux in the terahertz frequency region. The many orders of magnitude increase in the intensity over that presently achievable by conventional sources, has the potential to enable new science experiments. The characteristics of CIRCE and of the different modes of operation are described in this paper.
Date: June 29, 2004
Creator: Byrd, John M.; De Santis, Stefano; Jung, Jin-Young; Li, Derun; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, W. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

Description: Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the ...
Date: January 28, 2009
Creator: Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

Description: Several recent reports have identified the scientific requirements for a future soft x-ray light source, and a high-repetition-rate free-electron laser (FEL) facility that is responsive to these requirements is now on the horizon. R&D in some critical areas is needed, however, to demonstrate technical performance, thus reducing technical risks and construction costs. Such a facility most likely will be based on a CW superconducting linear accelerator with beam supplied by a high-brightness, high-repetition-rate photocathode electron gun operating in CW mode, and on an array of FELs to which the accelerated beam is distributed, each operating at high repetition rate and with even pulse spacing. Dependent on experimental requirements, the individual FELs can be configured for either self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), seeded, or oscillator mode of operation, including the use of high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enhanced harmonic generation (EEHG), harmonic cascade, or other configurations. In this White Paper we identify the overall accelerator R&D needs, and highlight the most important pre-construction R&D tasks required to value-engineer the design configuration and deliverables for such a facility. In Section 1.4 we identify the comprehensive R&D ultimately needed. We identify below the highest-priority requirements for understanding machine performance and reduce risk and costs at this pre-conceptual design stage. Details of implementing the required tasks will be the subject of future evaluation. Our highest-priority R&D program is the injector, which must be capable of delivering a beam with bunches up to a nanocoulomb at MHz repetition rate and with normalized emittance {le} 1 mm {center_dot} mrad. This will require integrated accelerating structure, cathode, and laser systems development. Cathode materials will impact the choice of laser technology in wavelength and energy per pulse, as well as vacuum requirements in the accelerating structure. Demonstration experiments in advanced seeding techniques, such as EEHG, and other optical manipulations to ...
Date: June 8, 2009
Creator: Corlett, John; Attwood, David; Byrd, John; Denes, Peter; Falcone, Roger; Heimann, Phil et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department