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Instrumentation optimization for positron emission mammography

Description: The past several years have seen designs for PET cameras optimized to image the breast, commonly known as Positron Emission Mammography or PEM cameras. The guiding principal behind PEM instrumentation is that a camera whose field of view is restricted to a single breast has higher performance and lower cost than a conventional PET camera. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules, although geometries that encircle the breast have also been proposed. The ability of the detector modules to measure the depth of interaction (DOI) is also a relevant feature. This paper finds that while both the additional solid angle coverage afforded by encircling the breast and the decreased blurring afforded by the DOI measurement improve performance, the ability to measure DOI is more important than the ability to encircle the breast.
Date: June 5, 2003
Creator: Moses, William W. & Qi, Jinyi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High Resolution PET with 250 micrometer LSO Detectors and Adaptive Zoom

Description: There have been impressive improvements in the performance of small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) systems since their first development in the mid 1990s, both in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which have directly contributed to the increasing adoption of this technology for a wide range of biomedical applications. Nonetheless, current systems still are largely dominated by the size of the scintillator elements used in the detector. Our research predicts that developing scintillator arrays with an element size of 250 {micro}m or smaller will lead to an image resolution of 500 {micro}m when using 18F- or 64Cu-labeled radiotracers, giving a factor of 4-8 improvement in volumetric resolution over the highest resolution research systems currently in existence. This proposal had two main objectives: (i) To develop and evaluate much higher resolution and efficiency scintillator arrays that can be used in the future as the basis for detectors in a small-animal PET scanner where the spatial resolution is dominated by decay and interaction physics rather than detector size. (ii) To optimize one such high resolution, high sensitivity detector and adaptively integrate it into the existing microPET II small animal PET scanner as a 'zoom-in' detector that provides higher spatial resolution and sensitivity in a limited region close to the detector face. The knowledge gained from this project will provide valuable information for building future PET systems with a complete ring of very high-resolution detector arrays and also lay the foundations for utilizing high-resolution detectors in combination with existing PET systems for localized high-resolution imaging.
Date: January 8, 2012
Creator: Cherry, Simon R. & Qi, Jinyi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Noise propagation in iterative reconstruction algorithms with line searches

Description: In this paper we analyze the propagation of noise in iterative image reconstruction algorithms. We derive theoretical expressions for the general form of preconditioned gradient algorithms with line searches. The results are applicable to a wide range of iterative reconstruction problems, such as emission tomography, transmission tomography, and image restoration. A unique contribution of this paper comparing to our previous work [1] is that the line search is explicitly modeled and we do not use the approximation that the gradient of the objective function is zero. As a result, the error in the estimate of noise at early iterations is significantly reduced.
Date: November 15, 2003
Creator: Qi, Jinyi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Theoretical evaluation of the detectability of random lesions in bayesian emission reconstruction

Description: Detecting cancerous lesion is an important task in positron emission tomography (PET). Bayesian methods based on the maximum a posteriori principle (also called penalized maximum likelihood methods) have been developed to deal with the low signal to noise ratio in the emission data. Similar to the filter cut-off frequency in the filtered backprojection method, the prior parameters in Bayesian reconstruction control the resolution and noise trade-off and hence affect detectability of lesions in reconstructed images. Bayesian reconstructions are difficult to analyze because the resolution and noise properties are nonlinear and object-dependent. Most research has been based on Monte Carlo simulations, which are very time consuming. Building on the recent progress on the theoretical analysis of image properties of statistical reconstructions and the development of numerical observers, here we develop a theoretical approach for fast computation of lesion detectability in Bayesian reconstruction. The results can be used to choose the optimum hyperparameter for the maximum lesion detectability. New in this work is the use of theoretical expressions that explicitly model the statistical variation of the lesion and background without assuming that the object variation is (locally) stationary. The theoretical results are validated using Monte Carlo simulations. The comparisons show good agreement between the theoretical predications and the Monte Carlo results.
Date: May 2003
Creator: Qi, Jinyi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Optimization of PET system design for lesion detection

Description: Traditionally, the figures of merit used in designing a PET scanner are spatial resolution, noise equivalent count rate, noise equivalent sensitivity, etc. These measures, however, do not directly reflect the lesion detectability using the PET scanner. Here we propose to optimize PET scanner design directly for lesion detection. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of lesion detection can be easily computed using the theoretical expressions that we have previously derived. Because no time consuming Monte Carlo simulation is needed, the theoretical expressions allow evaluation of a large range of parameters. The PET system parameters can then be chosen to achieve the maximum SNR for lesion detection. The simulation study shown in this paper was focused a single ring PET scanner without depth of interaction measurement. Randoms and scatters were also ignored.
Date: October 13, 2000
Creator: Qi, Jinyi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

List mode reconstruction for PET with motion compensation: A simulation study

Description: Motion artifacts can be a significant factor that limits the image quality in high-resolution PET. Surveillance systems have been developed to track the movements of the subject during a scan. Development of reconstruction algorithms that are able to compensate for the subject motion will increase the potential of PET. In this paper we present a list mode likelihood reconstruction algorithm with the ability of motion compensation. The subject moti is explicitly modeled in the likelihood function. The detections of each detector pair are modeled as a Poisson process with time vary ingrate function. The proposed method has several advantages over the existing methods. It uses all detected events and does not introduce any interpolation error. Computer simulations show that the proposed method can compensate simulated subject movements and that the reconstructed images have no visible motion artifacts.
Date: July 3, 2002
Creator: Qi, Jinyi & Huesman, Ronald H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spatiotemporal reconstruction of list-mode PET data

Description: We describe a method for computing a continuous time estimate of tracer density using list-mode positron emission tomography data. The rate function in each voxel is modeled as an inhomogeneous Poisson process whose rate function can be represented using a cubic B-spline basis. The rate functions are estimated by maximizing the likelihood of the arrival times of detected photon pairs over the control vertices of the spline, modified by quadratic spatial and temporal smoothness penalties and a penalty term to enforce nonnegativity. Randoms rate functions are estimated by assuming independence between the spatial and temporal randoms distributions. Similarly, scatter rate functions are estimated by assuming spatiotemporal independence and that the temporal distribution of the scatter is proportional to the temporal distribution of the trues. A quantitative evaluation was performed using simulated data and the method is also demonstrated in a human study using 11C-raclopride.
Date: March 1, 2002
Creator: Nichols, Thomas E.; Qi, Jinyi; Asma, Evren & Leahy, Richard M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Propagation of errors from the sensitivity image in list mode reconstruction

Description: List mode image reconstruction is attracting renewed attention. It eliminates the storage of empty sinogram bins. However, a single back projection of all LORs is still necessary for the pre-calculation of a sensitivity image. Since the detection sensitivity is dependent on the object attenuation and detector efficiency, it must be computed for each study. Exact computation of the sensitivity image can be a daunting task for modern scanners with huge numbers of LORs. Thus, some fast approximate calculation may be desirable. In this paper, we theoretically analyze the error propagation from the sensitivity image into the reconstructed image. The theoretical analysis is based on the fixed point condition of the list mode reconstruction. The non-negativity constraint is modeled using the Kuhn-Tucker condition. With certain assumptions and the first order Taylor series approximation, we derive a closed form expression for the error in the reconstructed image as a function of the error in the sensitivity image. The result provides insights on what kind of error might be allowable in the sensitivity image. Computer simulations show that the theoretical results are in good agreement with the measured results.
Date: November 15, 2003
Creator: Qi, Jinyi & Huesman, Ronald H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Image properties of list mode likelihood reconstruction for a rectangular positron emission mammography with DOI measurements

Description: A positron emission mammography scanner is under development at our Laboratory. The tomograph has a rectangular geometry consisting of four banks of detector modules. For each detector, the system can measure the depth of interaction information inside the crystal. The rectangular geometry leads to irregular radial and angular sampling and spatially variant sensitivity that are different from conventional PET systems. Therefore, it is of importance to study the image properties of the reconstructions. We adapted the theoretical analysis that we had developed for conventional PET systems to the list mode likelihood reconstruction for this tomograph. The local impulse response and covariance of the reconstruction can be easily computed using FFT. These theoretical results are also used with computer observer models to compute the signal-to-noise ratio for lesion detection. The analysis reveals the spatially variant resolution and noise properties of the list mode likelihood reconstruction. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with Monte Carlo results.
Date: October 1, 2000
Creator: Qi, Jinyi; Klein, Gregory J. & Huesman, Ronald H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fast approach to evaluate map reconstruction for lesion detection and localization

Description: Lesion detection is an important task in emission tomography. Localization ROC (LROC) studies are often used to analyze the lesion detection and localization performance. Most researchers rely on Monte Carlo reconstruction samples to obtain LROC curves, which can be very time-consuming for iterative algorithms. In this paper we develop a fast approach to obtain LROC curves that does not require Monte Carlo reconstructions. We use a channelized Hotelling observer model to search for lesions, and the results can be easily extended to other numerical observers. We theoretically analyzed the mean and covariance of the observer output. Assuming the observer outputs are multivariate Gaussian random variables, an LROC curve can be directly generated by integrating the conditional probability density functions. The high-dimensional integrals are calculated using a Monte Carlo method. The proposed approach is very fast because no iterative reconstruction is involved. Computer simulations show that the results of the proposed method match well with those obtained using the tradition LROC analysis.
Date: February 1, 2004
Creator: Qi, Jinyi & Huesman, Ronald H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fundamental limits of positron emission mammography

Description: We explore the causes of performance limitation in positron emission mammography cameras. We compare two basic camera geometries containing the same volume of 511 keV photon detectors, one with a parallel plane geometry and another with a rectangular geometry. We find that both geometries have similar performance for the phantom imaged (in Monte Carlo simulation), even though the solid angle coverage of the rectangular camera is about 50 percent higher than the parallel plane camera. The reconstruction algorithm used significantly affects the resulting image; iterative methods significantly outperform the commonly used focal plane tomography. Finally, the characteristics of the tumor itself, specifically the absolute amount of radiotracer taken up by the tumor, will significantly affect the imaging performance.
Date: June 1, 2001
Creator: Moses, William W. & Qi, Jinyi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wavelet crosstalk matrix and its application to assessment of shift-variant imaging systems

Description: The objective assessment of image quality is essential for design of imaging systems. Barrett and Gifford [1] introduced the Fourier cross talk matrix. Because it is diagonal for continuous linear shift-invariant imaging systems, the Fourier cross talk matrix is a powerful technique for discrete imaging systems that are close to shift invariant. However, for a system that is intrinsically shift variant, Fourier techniques are not particularly effective. Because Fourier bases have no localization property, the shift-variance of the imaging system cannot be shown by the response of individual Fourier bases; rather, it is shown in the correlation between the Fourier coefficients. This makes the analysis and optimization quite difficult. In this paper, we introduce a wavelet cross talk matrix based on wavelet series expansions. The wavelet cross talk matrix allows simultaneous study of the imaging system in both the frequency and spatial domains. Hence it is well suited for shift variant systems. We compared the wavelet cross talk matrix with the Fourier cross talk matrix for several simulated imaging systems, namely the interior and exterior tomography problems, limited angle tomography, and a rectangular geometry positron emission tomograph. The results demonstrate the advantages of the wavelet cross talk matrix in analyzing shift-variant imaging systems.
Date: November 1, 2002
Creator: Qi, Jinyi & Huesman, Ronald H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Scatter correction for positron emission mammography

Description: In this paper we present a scatter correction method for a regularized list mode maximum likelihood reconstruction algorithm for the positron emission mammograph (PEM) that is being developed at our laboratory. The scatter events inside the object are modeled as additive Poisson random variables in the forward model of the reconstruction algorithm. The mean scatter sinogram is estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation program. With the assumption that the background activity is nearly uniform, the Monte Carlo scatter simulation only needs to run once for each PEM configuration. This saves computational time. The crystal scatters are modeled as a shift-invariant blurring in image domain because they are more localized. Thus, the useful information in the crystal scatters can be deconvolved in high-resolution reconstructions. The propagation of the noise from the estimated scatter sinogram into the reconstruction is analyzed theoretically. The results provide an easy way to calculate the required number of events in the Monte Carlo scatter simulation for a given noise level in the image. The analysis is also applicable to other scatter estimation methods, provided that the covariance of the estimated scatter sinogram is available.
Date: April 1, 2002
Creator: Qi, Jinyi & Huesman, Ronald H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimation of the parameter covariance matrix for aone-compartment cardiac perfusion model estimated from a dynamic sequencereconstructed using map iterative reconstruction algorithms

Description: In dynamic cardiac SPECT estimates of kinetic parameters ofa one-compartment perfusion model are usually obtained in a two stepprocess: 1) first a MAP iterative algorithm, which properly models thePoisson statistics and the physics of the data acquisition, reconstructsa sequence of dynamic reconstructions, 2) then kinetic parameters areestimated from time activity curves generated from the dynamicreconstructions. This paper provides a method for calculating thecovariance matrix of the kinetic parameters, which are determined usingweighted least squares fitting that incorporates the estimated varianceand covariance of the dynamic reconstructions. For each transaxial slicesets of sequential tomographic projections are reconstructed into asequence of transaxial reconstructions usingfor each reconstruction inthe time sequence an iterative MAP reconstruction to calculate themaximum a priori reconstructed estimate. Time-activity curves for a sumof activity in a blood region inside the left ventricle and a sum in acardiac tissue region are generated. Also, curves for the variance of thetwo estimates of the sum and for the covariance between the two ROIestimates are generated as a function of time at convergence using anexpression obtained from the fixed-point solution of the statisticalerror of the reconstruction. A one-compartment model is fit to the tissueactivity curves assuming a noisy blood input function to give weightedleast squares estimates of blood volume fraction, wash-in and wash-outrate constants specifying the kinetics of 99mTc-teboroxime for theleftventricular myocardium. Numerical methods are used to calculate thesecond derivative of the chi-square criterion to obtain estimates of thecovariance matrix for the weighted least square parameter estimates. Eventhough the method requires one matrix inverse for each time interval oftomographic acquisition, efficient estimates of the tissue kineticparameters in a dynamic cardiac SPECT study can be obtained with presentday desk-top computers.
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: Gullberg, Grant T.; Huesman, Ronald H.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Qi,Jinyi & Ghosh Roy, Dilip N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A unified noise analysis for iterative image estimation

Description: Iterative image estimation methods have been widely used in emission tomography. Accurate estimate of the uncertainty of the reconstructed images is essential for quantitative applications. While theoretical approach has been developed to analyze the noise propagation from iteration to iteration, the current results are limited to only a few iterative algorithms that have an explicit multiplicative update equation. This paper presents a theoretical noise analysis that is applicable to a wide range of preconditioned gradient type algorithms. One advantage is that proposed method does not require an explicit expression of the preconditioner and hence it is applicable to some algorithms that involve line searches. By deriving fixed point expression from the iteration based results, we show that the iteration based noise analysis is consistent with the xed point based analysis. Examples in emission tomography and transmission tomography are shown.
Date: July 3, 2003
Creator: Qi, Jinyi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Optimization of Bayesian Emission tomographic reconstruction for region of interest quantitation

Description: Region of interest (ROI) quantitation is an important task in emission tomography (e.g., positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography). It is essential for exploring clinical factors such as tumor activity, growth rate, and the efficacy of therapeutic interventions. Bayesian methods based on the maximum a posteriori principle (or called penalized maximum likelihood methods) have been developed for emission image reconstructions to deal with the low signal to noise ratio of the emission data. Similar to the filter cut-off frequency in the filtered backprojection method, the smoothing parameter of the image prior in Bayesian reconstruction controls the resolution and noise trade-off and hence affects ROI quantitation. In this paper we present an approach for choosing the optimum smoothing parameter in Bayesian reconstruction for ROI quantitation. Bayesian reconstructions are difficult to analyze because the resolution and noise properties are nonlinear and object-dependent. Building on the recent progress on deriving the approximate expressions for the local impulse response function and the covariance matrix, we derived simplied theoretical expressions for the bias, the variance, and the ensemble mean squared error (EMSE) of the ROI quantitation. One problem in evaluating ROI quantitation is that the truth is often required for calculating the bias. This is overcome by using ensemble distribution of the activity inside the ROI and computing the average EMSE. The resulting expressions allow fast evaluation of the image quality for different smoothing parameters. The optimum smoothing parameter of the image prior can then be selected to minimize the EMSE.
Date: January 10, 2003
Creator: Qi, Jinyi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

List mode reconstruction for PET with motion compensation: A simulation study

Description: Motion artifacts can be a significant factor that limits the image quality in high-resolution PET. Surveillance systems have been developed to track the movements of the subject during a scan. Development of reconstruction algorithms that are able to compensate for the subject motion will increase the potential of PET. In this paper we present a list mode likelihood reconstruction algorithm with the ability of motion compensation. The subject motion is explicitly modeled in the likelihood function. The detections of each detector pair are modeled as a Poisson process with time-varying rate function. The proposed method has several advantages over the existing methods. It uses all detected events and does not introduce any interpolation error. Computer simulations show that the proposed method can compensate simulated subject movements and that the reconstructed images have no visible motion artifacts.
Date: July 1, 2002
Creator: Qi, Jinyi & Huesman, Ronald H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Covariance approximation for fast and accurate computation of channelized Hotelling observer statistics

Description: We describe a method for computing linear observer statistics for maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstructions of PET images. The method is based on a theoretical approximation for the mean and covariance of MAP reconstructions. In particular, we derive here a closed form for the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) statistic applied to 2D MAP images. We show reasonably good correspondence between these theoretical results and Monte Carlo studies. The accuracy and low computational cost of the approximation allow us to analyze the observer performance over a wide range of operating conditions and parameter settings for the MAP reconstruction algorithm.
Date: October 1, 1999
Creator: Bonetto, Paola; Qi, Jinyi & Leahy, Richard M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The development of a compact positron tomograph for prostate imaging

Description: We give design details and expected image results of a compact positron tomograph designed for prostate imaging that centers a patient between a pair of external curved detector banks (ellipse: 45 cm minor, 70 cm major axis). The bottom bank is fixed below the patient bed, and the top bank moves upward for patient access and downward for maximum sensitivity. Each bank is composed of two rows (axially) of 20 CTI PET Systems HR+ block detectors, forming two arcs that can be tilted to minimize attenuation. Compared to a conventional PET system, our camera uses about one-quarter the number of detectors and has almost two times higher solid angle coverage for a central point source, because the detectors are close to the patient. The detectors are read out by modified CTI HRRT data acquisition electronics. The individual detectors are angled in the plane to point towards the prostate to minimize reso
Date: December 17, 2002
Creator: Huber, Jennifer S.; Qi, Jinyi; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.; Huesman, Ronald H. & Budinger, Thomas F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of the LBNL positron emission mammography camera

Description: We present the construction status of the LBNL Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) camera, which utilizes a PET detector module with depth of interaction measurement consisting of 64 LSO crystals (3x3x30 mm3) coupled on one end to a single photomultiplier tube (PMT) and on the opposite end to a 64 pixel array of silicon photodiodes (PDs). The PMT provides an accurate timing pulse, the PDs identify the crystal of interaction, the sum provides a total energy signal, and the PD/(PD+PMT) ratio determines the depth of interaction. We have completed construction of all 42 PEM detector modules. All data acquisition electronics have been completed, fully tested and loaded onto the gantry. We have demonstrated that all functions of the custom IC work using the production rigid-flex boards and data acquisition system. Preliminary detector module characterization and coincidence data have been taken using the production system, including initial images.
Date: December 19, 2002
Creator: Huber, Jennifer S.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Wang, Jimmy; Maltz, Jonathon S.; Qi, Jinyi; Mandelli, Emanuele et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lesion detection and quantitation of positron emission mammography

Description: A Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) scanner dedicated to breast imaging is being developed at our laboratory. We have developed a list mode likelihood reconstruction algorithm for this scanner. Here we theoretically study the lesion detection and quantitation. The lesion detectability is studied theoretically using computer observers. We found that for the zero-order quadratic prior, the region of interest observer can achieve the performance of the prewhitening observer with a properly selected smoothing parameter. We also study the lesion quantitation using the test statistic of the region of interest observer. The theoretical expressions for the bias, variance, and ensemble mean squared error of the quantitation are derived. Computer simulations show that the theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the Monte Carlo results for both lesion detection and quantitation.
Date: December 1, 2001
Creator: Qi, Jinyi & Huesman, Ronald H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of a PET Camera Optimized for ProstateImaging

Description: We present the characterization of a positron emission tomograph for prostate imaging that centers a patient between a pair of external curved detector banks (ellipse: 45 cm minor, 70 cm major axis). The distance between detector banks adjusts to allow patient access and to position the detectors as closely as possible for maximum sensitivity with patients of various sizes. Each bank is composed of two axial rows of 20 HR+ block detectors for a total of 80 detectors in the camera. The individual detectors are angled in the transaxial plane to point towards the prostate to reduce resolution degradation in that region. The detectors are read out by modified HRRT data acquisition electronics. Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our dedicated-prostate camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less background (less randoms and lower scatter fraction) and a lower cost. We have completed construction of the camera. Characterization data and reconstructed images of several phantoms are shown. Sensitivity of a point source in the center is 946 cps/mu Ci. Spatial resolution is 4 mm FWHM in the central region.
Date: November 11, 2005
Creator: Huber, Jennifer S.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.; Qi,Jinyi; Hu, Jicun; Wang, G.C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Septa design for a prostate specific PET camera

Description: The recent development of new prostate tracers has motivated us to build a low cost PET camera optimized to image the prostate. Coincidence imaging of positron emitters is achieved using a pair of external curved detector banks. The bottom bank is fixed below the patient bed, and the top bank moves upward for patient access and downward for maximum sensitivity. In this paper, we study the design of septa for the prostate camera using Monte Carlo simulations. The system performance is measured by the detectability of a prostate lesion. We have studied 17 septa configurations. The results show that the design of septa has a large impact on the lesion detection at a given activity concentration. Significant differences are also observed between the lesion detectability and the conventional noise equivalent count (NEC) performance, indicating that the NEC is not appropriate for the detection task.
Date: November 15, 2003
Creator: Qi, Jinyi; Huber, Jennifer S.; Huesman, Ronald H.; Moses, William W.; Derenzo, Stephen E. & Budinger, Thomas F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department