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Proximity functions for modeling fluids and heat flow in reservoirs with stochastic fracture distributions

Description: Conventional approaches to geothermal reservoir modeling have employed a porous medium approximation, but recently methods have been developed which can take into account the different thermodynamic conditions in rock matrix and fractures. The multiple interacting continua method (MINC) treats the thermal and hydraulic interaction between rock matrix and fractures in terms of a set of geometrical parameters. However, this approach was restricted to idealized fracture distributions with regularly shaped matrix blocks. Fractures in geothermal reservoirs usually occur in nearly parallel sets with a certain scatter in orientation, and a stochastic distribution of spacings and apertures. The MINC-method was extended to realistic fracture systems with stochastic distributions. The interaction between matrix and fractures is parameterized in terms of a proximity function, which represents the volume of matrix rock as a function of distance from the fractures. Monte Carlo techniques were employed to compute proximity functions for a number of two-dimensional systems with regular or stochastic fracture distributions. It is shown how the proximity functions can be used to generate computational grids for modeling fluid and heat flow in fractured reservoirs.
Date: October 1982
Creator: Pruess, Karsten & Karasaki, Kenzi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Exploratory Simulation Studies of Caprock Alteration Induced byStorage of CO2 in Depleted Gas Reservoirs

Description: This report presents numerical simulations of isothermalreactive flows which might be induced in the caprock of an Italiandepleted gas reservoir by the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide.Our objective is to verify that CO2 geological disposal activitiesalready planned for the study area are safe and do not induce anyundesired environmental impact.Gas-water-rock interactions have beenmodelled under two different intial conditions, i.e., assuming that i)caprock is perfectly sealed, or ii) partially fractured. Field conditionsare better approximated in terms of the "sealed caprock model". Thefractured caprock model has been implemented because it permits toexplore the geochemical beahvior of the system under particularly severeconditions which are not currently encountered in the field, and then todelineate a sort of hypothetical maximum risk scenario.Major evidencessupporting the assumption of a sealed caprock stem from the fact that nogas leakages have been detected during the exploitation phase, subsequentreservoir repressurization due to the ingression of a lateral aquifer,and during several cycles of gas storage in the latest life of reservoirmanagement.An extensive program of multidisciplinary laboratory tests onrock properties, geochemical and microseismic monitoring, and reservoirsimulation studies is underway to better characterize the reservoir andcap-rock behavior before the performance of a planned CO2 sequestrationpilot test.In our models, fluid flow and mineral alteration are inducedin the caprock by penetration of high CO2 concentrations from theunderlying reservoir, i.e., it was assumed that large amounts of CO2 havebeen already injected at depth. The main focus is on the potential effectof these geochemical transformations on the sealing efficiency of caprockformations. Batch and multi-dimensional 1D and 2D modeling has been usedto investigate multicomponent geochemical processes. Our simulationsaccount for fracture-matrix interactions, gas phase participation inmultiphase fluid flow and geochemical reactions, and kinetics offluid-rock interactions.The main objectives of the modeling are torecognize the geochemical processes or parameters to which theadvancement of high CO2 concentrations in the caprock is most ...
Date: November 23, 2005
Creator: Gherardi, Fabrizio; Xu, Tianfu & Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Injection plume behavior in fractured, vapor-dominated reservoirs

Description: We discuss fluid flow and heat transfer processes during water injection into hot, fluid-depleted vapor zones. Numerical simulations of injection plumes in fractures, modeled as two-dimensional heterogeneous porous media, indicate complex behavior. Under certain conditions it is possible to make detailed quantitative predictions of vaporization behavior. However, when effects of reservoir heterogeneity are dominant it will only be possible to predict the behavior of injection plumes in general terms.
Date: January 24, 1996
Creator: Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Liquid-phase dispersion during injection into vapor-dominated reservoirs

Description: The behavior of water injection plumes in vapor-dominated reservoirs is examined. Stressing the similarity to water infiltration in heterogeneous soils, we suggest that everpresent heterogeneities in individual fractures and fracture networks will cause a lateral broadening of descending injection plumes. The process of lateral spreading of liquid phase is viewed in analogy to transverse dispersion in miscible displacement. To account for the postulated “phase dispersion” the conventional two-phase immiscible flow theory is extended by adding a Fickian-type dispersive term. The validity of the proposed phase dispersion model is explored by means of simulations with detailed resolution of small-scale heterogeneity. We also present an illustrative application to injection into a depleted vapor zone. It is concluded that phase dispersion effects will broaden descending injection plumes, with important consequences for pressure support and potential water breakthrough at neighboring production wells.
Date: January 20, 1994
Creator: Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) comparing water with CO2 as heattransmission fluids

Description: This paper summarizes our research to date into operatingEGS with CO2. Our modeling studies indicate that CO2 would achieve morefavorable heat extraction than aqueous fluids. The peculiarthermophysicalproperties of CO2 give rise to unusual features in the dependence ofenergy recovery on thermodynamic conditions and time. Preliminarygeochemical studies suggest that CO2 may avoid unfavorable rock-fluidinteractions that have been encountered in water-basedsystems. To morefully evaluate the potential of EGS with CO2 will require an integratedresearch programme of model development, and laboratory and fieldstudies.
Date: November 1, 2007
Creator: Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Role of Fluid Pressure in the Production Behavior of EnhancedGeothermal Systems with CO2 as Working Fluid

Description: Numerical simulation is used to evaluate mass flow and heatextraction rates from enhanced geothermal injection-production systemsthat are operated using either CO2 or water as heat transmission fluid.For a model system patterned after the European hot dry rock experimentat Soultz, we find significantly greater heat extraction rates for CO2 ascompared to water. The strong dependence of CO2 mobility (=density/viscosity) upon temperature and pressure may lead to unusualproduction behavior, where heat extraction rates can actually increasefor a time, even as the reservoir is subject to thermaldepletion.
Date: April 13, 2007
Creator: Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Grid orientation effects in the simulation of cold water injection into depleted vapor zones

Description: Vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs such as Larderello, Italy, and The Geysers, California, are fundamentally water-short systems. This is apparent from the relatively low pressures in the natural state, typically about 35 bars at 1000 m depth, which is much below hydrostatic pressures. It is also apparent from the high heat content of the produced fluids, typically superheated steam. Large-scale production from these systems has caused reservoir pressures and well flow rates to decline, leading to an underutilization of installed electrical generating capacity. Clearly, these reservoirs are beginning to run out of fluid, while heat reserves in place are still enormous. (At Larderello, there is a long-term trend of increasing formation temperatures in the upper productive zones of the reservoir; Sestini, 1970). Reinjection of colder waste waters, or injection of waters from a source other than the geothermal reservoir, is the primary means by which dwindling fluid reserves can be replenished. A considerable body of field experience with injection has been accumulated at Larderello and The Geysers; the results have been mixed. There are well documented cases where injection has increased flow rates of nearby wells. Return of injected fluid as steam from production wells has been observed directly through chemical and isotopic changes of produced fluids (Giovannoni et al., 1981; Nuti et al., 1981). In other cases injection has caused thermal interference and has degraded the temperature and pressure of production wells. Water injection into depleted vapor zones gives rise to complex two-phase fluid flow and heat transfer processes with phase change. These are further complicated by the fractured-porous nature of the reservoir rocks. An optimization of injection design and operating practice is desirable; this requires realistic and robust mathematical modeling capabilities.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Numerical Modeling of CO2 Sequestration in Geologic Formations -Recent Results and Open Challenges

Description: Rising atmospheric concentrations of CO2, and their role inglobal warming, have prompted efforts to reduce emissions of CO2 fromburning of fossil fuels. An attractive mitigation option underconsideration in many countries is the injection of CO2 from stationarysources, such as fossil-fueled power plants, into deep, stable geologicformations, where it would be stored and kept out of the atmosphere fortime periods of hundreds to thousands of years or more. Potentialgeologic storage reservoirs include depleted or depleting oil and gasreservoirs, unmineable coal seams, and saline formations. While oil andgas reservoirs may provide some attractive early targets for CO2 storage,estimates for geographic regions worldwide have suggested that onlysaline formations would provide sufficient storage capacity tosubstantially impact atmospheric releases. This paper will focus on CO2storage in saline formations.Injection of CO2 into a saline aquifer willgive rise to immiscible displacement of brine by the advancing CO2. Thelower viscosity of CO2 relative to aqueous fluids provides a potentialfor hydrodynamic instabilities during the displacement process. Attypical subsurface conditions of temperature and pressure, CO2 is lessdense than aqueous fluids and is subject to upward buoyancy force inenvironments where pressures are controlled by an ambient aqueous phase.Thus CO2 would tend to rise towards the top of a permeable formation andaccumulate beneath the caprock. Some CO2 will also dissolve in theaqueous phase, while the CO2-rich phase may dissolve some formationwaters, which would tend to dry out the vicinity of the injection wells.CO2 will make formation waters more acidic, and will induce chemicalrections that may precipitate and dissolve mineral phases (Xu et al.,2004). As a consequence of CO2 injection, significant pressurization offormation fluids would occur over large areas. These pressurizationeffects will change effective stresses, and may cause movement alongfaults with associated seismicity and increases in permeability thatcould lead to leakage from the storage reservoir (Rutqvist and Tsang,2005).
Date: March 8, 2006
Creator: Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

On CO2 Behavior in the Subsurface, Following Leakage from aGeologic Storage Reservoir

Description: The amounts of CO2 that would need to be injected intogeologic storage reservoirs to achieve a significant reduction ofatmospheric emissions are very large. A 1000 MWe coal-fired power plantemits approximately 30,000 tonnes of CO2 per day, 10 Mt per year(Hitchon, 1996). When injected underground over a typical lifetime of 30years of such a plant, the CO2 plume may occupy a large area of order 100km2 or more, and fluid pressure increase in excess of 1 bar(corresponding to 10 m water head) may extend over an area of more than2,500 km2 (Pruess, et al., 2003). The large areal extent expected for CO2plumes makes it likely that caprock imperfections will be encountered,such as fault zones or fractures, which may allow some CO2 to escape fromthe primary storage reservoir. Under most subsurface conditions oftemperature and pressure, CO2 is buoyant relative to groundwaters. If(sub-)vertical pathways are available, CO2 will tend to flow upward and,depending on geologic conditions, may eventually reach potablegroundwater aquifers or even the land surface. Leakage of CO2 could alsooccur along wellbores, including pre-existing and improperly abandonedwells, or wells drilled in connection with the CO2 storage operations.The pressure increases accompanying CO2 injection will give rise tochanges in effective stress that could cause movement along faults,increasing permeability and potential for leakage.Escape of CO2 from aprimary geologic storage reservoir and potential hazards associated withits discharge at the land surface raise a number of concerns, including(1) acidification of groundwater resources, (2) asphyxiation hazard whenleaking CO2 is discharged at the land surface, (3) increase inatmospheric concentrations of CO2, and (4) damage from a high-energy,eruptive discharge (if such discharge is physically possible). In orderto gain public acceptance for geologic storage as a viable technology forreducing atmospheric emissions of CO2, it is necessary to address theseissues and demonstrate that CO2 can be injected and stored safely ingeologic formations. ...
Date: February 9, 2006
Creator: Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in EnhancedGeothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as working fluid

Description: There is growing interest in the novel concept of operating Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO{sub 2} instead of water as heat transmission fluid. Initial studies have suggested that CO{sub 2} will achieve larger rates of heat extraction, and can offer geologic storage of carbon as an ancillary benefit. Fluid-rock interactions in EGS operated with CO{sub 2} are expected to be vastly different in zones with an aqueous phase present, as compared to the central reservoir zone with anhydrous supercritical CO{sub 2}. Our numerical simulations of chemically reactive transport show a combination of mineral dissolution and precipitation effects in the peripheral zone of the systems. These could impact reservoir growth and longevity, with important ramifications for sustaining energy recovery, for estimating CO{sub 2} loss rates, and for figuring tradeoffs between power generation and geologic storage of CO{sub 2}.
Date: January 17, 2008
Creator: Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten & Apps, John
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Numerical simulation of leakage from a geologic disposal reservoirfor CO2, with transitions between super- and sub-criticalconditions

Description: The critical point of CO2 is at temperature and pressureconditions of Tcrit = 31.04oC, Pcrit = 73.82 bar. At lower (subcritical)temperatures and/or pressures, CO2 can exist in two different phases, aliquid and a gaseous state, as well as in two-phase mixtures of thesestates. Disposal of CO2 into brine formations would be made atsupercritical pressures. However, CO2 escaping from the storage reservoirmay migrate upwards towards regions with lower temperatures andpressures, where CO2 would be in subcritical conditions. An assessment ofthe fate of leaking CO2 requires a capability to model not onlysupercritical but also subcritical CO2, as well as phase changes betweenliquid and gaseous CO2 in sub-critical conditions. We have developed amethodology for numerically simulating the behavior of water-CO2 mixturesin permeable media under conditions that may include liquid, gaseous, andsupercritical CO2. This has been applied to simulations of leakage from adeep storage reservoir in which a rising CO2 plume undergoes transitionsfrom supercritical to subcritical conditions. We find strong coolingeffects when liquid CO2 rises to elevations where it begins to boil andevolve a gaseous CO2 phase. A three-phase zone forms (aqueous - liquid -gas), which over time becomes several hundred meters thick as decreasingtemperatures permit liquid CO2 to advance to shallower elevations. Fluidmobilities are reduced in the three-phase region from phase interferenceeffects. This impedes CO2 upflow, causes the plume to spread outlaterally, and gives rise to dispersed CO2 discharge at the land surface.Our simulations suggest that temperatures along a CO2 leakage path maydecline to levels low enough so that solid water ice and CO2 hydratephases may be formed.
Date: April 13, 2003
Creator: Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Numerical modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers

Description: Data from injection experiments in the southeast Geysers are presented that show strong interference (both negative and positive) with a neighboring production well. Conceptual and numerical models are developed that explain the negative interference (decline of production rate) in terms of heat transfer limitations and water-vapor relative permeability effects. Recovery and overrecovery following injection shut-in are attributed to boiling of injected fluid, with heat of vaporization provided by the reservoir rocks.
Date: January 28, 1993
Creator: Pruess, Karsten & Enedy, Steve
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Large-scale three-dimensional geothermal reservoir simulation on PCs

Description: TOUGH2, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's general purpose simulator for mass and heat flow and transport was enhanced with the addition of a set of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers and ported to a PC. The code was applied to a number of large 3-D geothermal reservoir problems with up to 10,000 grid blocks. Four test problems were investigated. The first two involved a single-phase liquid system, and a two-phase system with regular Cartesian grids. The last two involved a two-phase field problem with irregular gridding with production from and injection into a single porosity reservoir, and a fractured reservoir. The code modifications to TOUGH2 and its setup in the PC environment are described. Algorithms suitable for solving large matrices that are generally non-symmetric and non-positive definite are reviewed. Computational work per time step and CPU time requirements are reported as function of problem size. The excessive execution time and storage requirements of the direct solver in TOUGH2 limits the size of manageable 3-D reservoir problems to a few hundred grid blocks. The conjugate gradient solvers significantly reduced the execution time and storage requirements making possible the execution of considerably larger problems (10,000+ grid blocks). It is concluded that the current PCs provide an economical platform for running large-scale geothermal field simulations that just a few years ago could only be executed on mainframe computers.
Date: January 20, 1994
Creator: Antunez, Emilio; Moridis, George & Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominatedgeothermal reservoirs

Description: Water injection has been recognized as a powerful techniquefor enhancing energy recovery from vapor-dominated geothermal systemssuch as The Geysers. In addition to increasing reservoir pressures,production well flow rates, and long-term sustainability of steamproduction, injection has also been shown to reduce concentrations ofnon-condensible gases (NCGs) in produced steam. The latter effectimproves energy conversion efficiency and reduces corrosion problems inwellbores and surface lines.This report reviews thermodynamic andhydrogeologic conditions and mechanisms that play an important role inreservoir response to water injection. An existing general-purposereservoir simulator has been enhanced to allow modeling of injectioneffects in heterogeneous fractured reservoirs in three dimensions,including effects of non-condensible gases of different solubility.Illustrative applications demonstrate fluid flow and heat transfermechanisms that are considered crucial for developing approaches to insitu abatement of NCGs.
Date: November 6, 2006
Creator: Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

TMVOC-MP: a parallel numerical simulator for Three-PhaseNon-isothermal Flows of Multicomponent Hydrocarbon Mixtures inporous/fractured media

Description: TMVOC-MP is a massively parallel version of the TMVOC code (Pruess and Battistelli, 2002), a numerical simulator for three-phase non-isothermal flow of water, gas, and a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous/fractured media. TMVOC-MP was developed by introducing massively parallel computing techniques into TMVOC. It retains the physical process model of TMVOC, designed for applications to contamination problems that involve hydrocarbon fuels or organic solvents in saturated and unsaturated zones. TMVOC-MP can model contaminant behavior under 'natural' environmental conditions, as well as for engineered systems, such as soil vapor extraction, groundwater pumping, or steam-assisted source remediation. With its sophisticated parallel computing techniques, TMVOC-MP can handle much larger problems than TMVOC, and can be much more computationally efficient. TMVOC-MP models multiphase fluid systems containing variable proportions of water, non-condensible gases (NCGs), and water-soluble volatile organic chemicals (VOCs). The user can specify the number and nature of NCGs and VOCs. There are no intrinsic limitations to the number of NCGs or VOCs, although the arrays for fluid components are currently dimensioned as 20, accommodating water plus 19 components that may be either NCGs or VOCs. Among them, NCG arrays are dimensioned as 10. The user may select NCGs from a data bank provided in the software. The currently available choices include O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, ethane, ethylene, acetylene, and air (a pseudo-component treated with properties averaged from N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}). Thermophysical property data of VOCs can be selected from a chemical data bank, included with TMVOC-MP, that provides parameters for 26 commonly encountered chemicals. Users also can input their own data for other fluids. The fluid components may partition (volatilize and/or dissolve) among gas, aqueous, and NAPL phases. Any combination of the three phases may present, and phases may appear and ...
Date: February 15, 2008
Creator: Zhang, Keni; Yamamoto, Hajime & Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multiphase fluid flow and subsequent geochemical transport invariably saturated fractured rocks: 1. Approaches

Description: Reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport in unsaturated fractured rocks has received increasing attention for studies of contaminant transport, groundwater quality, waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, mineral deposits, sedimentary diagenesis, and fluid-rock interactions in hydrothermal systems. This paper presents methods for modeling geochemical systems that emphasize: (1) involvement of the gas phase in addition to liquid and solid phases in fluid flow, mass transport and chemical reactions, (2) treatment of physically and chemically heterogeneous and fractured rocks, (3) the effect of heat on fluid flow and reaction properties and processes, and (4) the kinetics of fluid-rock interaction. The physical and chemical process model is embodied in a system of partial differential equations for flow and transport, coupled to algebraic equations and ordinary differential equations for chemical interactions. For numerical solution, the continuum equations are discretized in space and time. Space discretization is based on a flexible integral finite difference approach that can use irregular gridding to model geologic structure; time is discretized fully implicitly as a first-order finite difference. Heterogeneous and fractured media are treated with a general multiple interacting continua method that includes double-porosity, dual-permeability, and multi-region models as special cases. A sequential iteration approach is used to treat the coupling between fluid flow and mass transport on the one hand, chemical reactions on the other. Applications of the methods developed here to variably saturated geochemical systems are presented in a companion paper (part 2, this issue).
Date: August 8, 2000
Creator: Xu, Tianfu & Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coupled modeling of non-isothermal multiphase flow, solutetransport and reactive chemistry in porous and fractured media: 1. ModelDevelopment and Validation

Description: Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport and chemical reactions can be used for the assessment of acid mine drainage remediation, mineral deposition, waste disposal sites, hydrothermal convection, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. Here they present a numerical simulation model, TOUGHREACT, which considers non-isothermal multi-component chemical transport in both liquid and gas phases. A wide range of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes is considered. The model can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The model can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions is considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, cation exchange, and surface complexation. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can proceed either subject to local equilibrium or kinetic conditions. The coupled model employs a sequential iteration approach with reasonable computing efficiency. The development of the governing equations and numerical approach is presented along with the discussion of the model implementation and capabilities. The model is verified for a wide range of subsurface physical and chemical processes. The model is well suited for flow and reactive transport in variably saturated porous and fractured media. In the second of this two-part paper, three applications covering a variety of problems are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the model.
Date: September 1, 1998
Creator: Xu, Tianfu & Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Some effects of non-condensible gas in geothermal reservoirs with steam-water counterflow

Description: A mathematical model is developed for fluid and heat flow in two-phase geothermal reservoirs containing non-condensible gas (CO{sub 2}). Vertical profiles of temperature, pressures and phase saturations in steady-state conditions are obtained by numerically integrating the coupled ordinary differential equations describing conservation of water, CO{sub 2}, and energy. Solutions including binary diffusion effects in the gas phase are generated for cases with net mass throughflow as well as for balanced liquid-vapor counterflow. Calculated examples illustrate some fundamental characteristics of two-phase heat transmission systems with non-condensible gas.
Date: January 1, 1988
Creator: McKibbin, Robert & Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

On Leakage from Geologic Storage Reservoirs of CO2

Description: Large amounts of CO2 would need to be injected underground to achieve a significant reduction of atmospheric emissions. The large areal extent expected for CO2 plumes makes it likely that caprock imperfections will be encountered, such as fault zones or fractures, which may allow some CO2 to escape from the primary storage reservoir. Leakage of CO2 could also occur along wellbores. Concerns with escape of CO2 from a primary geologic storage reservoir include (1) acidification of groundwater resources, (2) asphyxiation hazard when leaking CO2 is discharged at the land surface, (3) increase in atmospheric concentrations of CO2, and (4) damage from a high-energy, eruptive discharge (if such discharge is physically possible). In order to gain public acceptance for geologic storage as a viable technology for reducing atmospheric emissions of CO2, it is necessary to address these issues and demonstrate that CO2 can be injected and stored safely in geologic formations.
Date: February 14, 2006
Creator: Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of capillarity and vapor adsorption in the depletion of vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs

Description: Vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs in natural (undisturbed) conditions contain water as both vapor and liquid phases. The most compelling evidence for the presence of distributed liquid water is the observation that vapor pressures in these systems are close to saturated vapor pressure for measured reservoir temperatures (White et al., 1971; Truesdell and White, 1973). Analysis of natural heat flow conditions provides additional, indirect evidence for the ubiquitous presence of liquid. From an analysis of the heat pipe process (vapor-liquid counterflow) Preuss (1985) inferred that effective vertical permeability to liquid phase in vapor-dominated reservoirs is approximately 10{sup 17} m{sup 2}, for a heat flux of 1 W/m{sup 2}. This value appears to be at the high end of matrix permeabilities of unfractured rocks at The Geysers, suggesting that at least the smaller fractures contribute to liquid permeability. For liquid to be mobile in fractures, the rock matrix must be essentially completely liquid-saturated, because otherwise liquid phase would be sucked from the fractures into the matrix by capillary force. Large water saturation in the matrix, well above the irreducible saturation of perhaps 30%, has been shown to be compatible with production of superheated steam (Pruess and Narasimhan, 1982). In response to fluid production the liquid phase will boil, with heat of vaporization supplied by the reservoir rocks. As reservoir temperatures decline reservoir pressures will decline also. For depletion of ''bulk'' liquid, the pressure would decline along the saturated vapor pressure curve, while for liquid held by capillary and adsorptive forces inside porous media, an additional decline will arise from ''vapor pressure lowering''. Capillary pressure and vapor adsorption effects, and associated vapor pressure lowering phenomena, have received considerable attention in the geothermal literature, and also in studies related to geologic disposal of heat generating nuclear wastes, and in the drying of porous materials. Geothermally ...
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Pruess, Karsten & O'Sullivan, Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Formation dry-out from CO2 injection into saline acquifers: Part 2, Analytical model for salt precipitation

Description: From a mass balance for water dissolved into the flowing CO{sub 2} stream, and a consideration of saturation profiles from the Buckley-Leverett (1942) fractional flow theory, we derive an equation that directly relates gas saturation S{sub g,d} at the dry-out front to temperature, pressure and salinity dependence of fluid properties. The equation is easily solved by iteration or interpolation. From gas saturation at the front we derive the average gas saturation in the dry-out region, from which we obtain the 'solid saturation' S{sub S}, i.e., the fraction of pore space filled with solid precipitate. Values of S{sub S} derived from this theory show excellent agreement with numerical simulations presented in the preceding companion paper ('Part 1'). Thus, from relative permeabilities and fluid properties at in situ conditions prior to CO{sub 2} injection, it is possible to directly make an accurate estimate of solids precipitation, without having to perform a numerical simulation of the injection process.
Date: February 1, 2009
Creator: Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Numerical simulation experiments on the long-term evolution of a CO2 plume under a sloping caprock

Description: We have used the TOUGH2-MP/ECO2N code to perform numerical simulation studies of the long-term behavior of CO{sub 2} stored in an aquifer with a sloping caprock. This problem is of great practical interest, and is very challenging due to the importance of multi-scale processes. We find that the mechanism of plume advance is different from what is seen in a forced immiscible displacement, such as gas injection into a water-saturated medium. Instead of pushing the water forward, the plume advances because the vertical pressure gradients within the plume are smaller than hydrostatic, causing the water column to collapse at the plume tip. Gas saturations and updip CO{sub 2} fluxes are nearly constant, independent of time and position, in the upper, mobile portions of the plume. The CO{sub 2} plume becomes thinner as it advances, yet the speed of advancement remains constant over the entire simulation period of up to 400 years, with migration distances of more than 80 km. Our simulation includes dissolution of CO{sub 2} into the aqueous phase and associated density increase, and molecular diffusion. However, no convection develops in the aqueous phase because it is suppressed by the relatively coarse (sub-)horizontal gridding required in a regional-scale model. A first crude sub-grid-scale model was implemented to represent convective enhancement of CO{sub 2} dissolution. This process is found to greatly reduce the thickness of the CO{sub 2} plume, but does not affect the speed of plume advancement.
Date: August 15, 2009
Creator: Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal Effects During CO2 Leakage from a Geologic Storage Reservoir

Description: Leakage of CO2 from a geologic storage reservoir along an idealized fault zone has been simulated, including transitions between supercritical, liquid, and gaseous CO2. We find strong non-isothermal effects and nonmonotonic leakage behavior, due to an interplay between multiphase flow and heat transfer effects.
Date: June 30, 2004
Creator: Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Injection in Heterogeneous Porous Media

Description: We investigate the physical processes that occur during the sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in liquid-saturated, brine-bearing geologic formations using the numerical simulator TOUGH2. CO2 is injected in a supercritical state that has a much lower density and viscosity than the liquid brine it displaces. In situ, the supercritical CO2 forms a gas-like phase, and also partially dissolves in the aqueous phase, creating a multi-phase, multi-component environment that shares many important features with the vadose zone. The flow and transport simulations employ an equation of state package that treats a two-phase (liquid, gas), three-component (water, salt, CO2) system. Chemical reactions between CO2 and rock minerals that could potentially contribute to mineral trapping of CO2 are not included. The geological setting considered is a fluvial/deltaic formation that is strongly heterogeneous, making preferential flow a significant effect, especially when coupled with the strong buoyancy forces acting on the gas-like CO2 plume. Key model development issues include vertical and lateral grid resolution, grid orientation effects, and the choice of characteristic curves.
Date: April 10, 2003
Creator: Doughty, Christine & Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department