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Challenges facing production grids

Description: Today's global communities of users expect quality of service from distributed Grid systems equivalent to that their local data centers. This must be coupled to ubiquitous access to the ensemble of processing and storage resources across multiple Grid infrastructures. We are still facing significant challenges in meeting these expectations, especially in the underlying security, a sustainable and successful economic model, and smoothing the boundaries between administrative and technical domains. Using the Open Science Grid as an example, I examine the status and challenges of Grids operating in production today.
Date: June 1, 2007
Creator: Pordes, Ruth
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Distributed data access and resource management in the D0 SAM system

Description: SAM (Sequential Access through Meta-data) is the data access and job management system for the D0 high energy physics experiment at Fermilab. The SAM system is being developed and used to handle the Petabyte-scale experiment data, accessed by hundreds of D0 collaborators scattered around the world. In this paper, we present solutions to some of the distributed data processing problems from the perspective of real experience dealing with mission-critical data. We concentrate on the distributed disk caching, resource management and job control. The system has elements of the Grid Computing and has features applicable to data-intensive computing in general.
Date: June 26, 2001
Creator: Terekhov, Igor V; Pordes, Ruth & al., Victoria White et
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

G-NetMon: A GPU-accelerated Network Performance Monitoring System for Large Scale Scientific Collaborations

Description: At Fermilab, we have prototyped a GPU-accelerated network performance monitoring system, called G-NetMon, to support large-scale scientific collaborations. Our system exploits the data parallelism that exists within network flow data to provide fast analysis of bulk data movement between Fermilab and collaboration sites. Experiments demonstrate that our G-NetMon can rapidly detect sub-optimal bulk data movements.
Date: August 1, 2011
Creator: Wu, Wenji; DeMar, Phil; Holmgren, Don; Singh, Amitoj; Pordes, Ruth & /Fermilab
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Open Science Grid

Description: The Open Science Grid (OSG) provides a distributed facility where the Consortium members provide guaranteed and opportunistic access to shared computing and storage resources. OSG provides support for and evolution of the infrastructure through activities that cover operations, security, software, troubleshooting, addition of new capabilities, and support for existing and engagement with new communities. The OSG SciDAC-2 project provides specific activities to manage and evolve the distributed infrastructure and support its use. The innovative aspects of the project are the maintenance and performance of a collaborative (shared & common) petascale national facility over tens of autonomous computing sites, for many hundreds of users, transferring terabytes of data a day, executing tens of thousands of jobs a day, and providing robust and usable resources for scientific groups of all types and sizes. More information can be found at the OSG web site: www.opensciencegrid.org.
Date: June 1, 2007
Creator: Pordes, Ruth; Kramer, Bill; Olson, Doug; Livny, Miron; Roy, Alain; Avery, Paul et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New Science on the Open Science Grid

Description: The Open Science Grid (OSG) includes work to enable new science, new scientists, and new modalities in support of computationally based research. There are frequently significant sociological and organizational changes required in transformation from the existing to the new. OSG leverages its deliverables to the large scale physics experiment member communities to benefit new communities at all scales through activities in education, engagement and the distributed facility. As a partner to the poster and tutorial at SciDAC 2008, this paper gives both a brief general description and some specific examples of new science enabled on the OSG. More information is available at the OSG web site: www.opensciencegrid.org.
Date: June 1, 2008
Creator: Pordes, Ruth; Altunay, Mine; Avery, Paul; Bejan, Alina; Blackburn, Kent; Blatecky, Alan et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Open Science Grid status and architecture

Description: The Open Science Grid (OSG) provides a distributed facility where the Consortium members provide guaranteed and opportunistic access to shared computing and storage resources. The OSG project[1] is funded by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing program. The OSG project provides specific activities for the operation and evolution of the common infrastructure. The US ATLAS and US CMS collaborations contribute to and depend on OSG as the US infrastructure contributing to the World Wide LHC Computing Grid on which the LHC experiments distribute and analyze their data. Other stakeholders include the STAR RHIC experiment, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and several Fermilab Tevatron experiments- CDF, D0, MiniBoone etc. The OSG implementation architecture brings a pragmatic approach to enabling vertically integrated community specific distributed systems over a common horizontal set of shared resources and services. More information can be found at the OSG web site: www.opensciencegrid.org.
Date: September 1, 2007
Creator: Pordes, Ruth; Petravick, Don; /Fermilab; Kramer, Bill; Olsen, James D.; /LBL, Berkeley et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department