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Recent Improvements to the IMPACT-T Parallel Particle TrackingCode

Description: The IMPACT-T code is a parallel three-dimensional quasi-static beam dynamics code for modeling high brightness beams in photoinjectors and RF linacs. Developed under the US DOE Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program, it includes several key features including a self-consistent calculation of 3D space-charge forces using a shifted and integrated Green function method, multiple energy bins for beams with large energy spread, and models for treating RF standing wave and traveling wave structures. In this paper, we report on recent improvements to the IMPACT-T code including modeling traveling wave structures, short-range transverse and longitudinal wakefields, and longitudinal coherent synchrotron radiation through bending magnets.
Date: November 16, 2006
Creator: Qiang, J.; Pogorelov, I.V. & Ryne, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Single Pass Electron Cooling Simulations for MEIC

Description: Cooling of medium energy protons is critical for the proposed Jefferson Lab Medium Energy Ion Collider (MEIC). We present simulations of electron cooling of protons up to 60 GeV. In the beam frame in which the proton and electrons are co-propagating, their motion is non-relativistic. We use a binary collision model which treats the cooling process as the sum of a large number of two-body collisions which are calculated exactly. This model can treat even very close collisions between an electron and ion with high accuracy. We also calculate dynamical friction using a delta-f PIC model. The code VSim (formerly Vorpal) is used to perform the simulations. We compare the friction rates with that obtained by a 3D integral over electron velocities which is used by BETACOOL.
Date: December 1, 2013
Creator: Bell, G. I.; Pogorelov, I. V.; Schwartz, B. T.; Zhang, Yuhong & Zhang, He
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recent Developments in Impact and Application to Future Light Sources

Description: This paper discusses two recently added capabilities of the IMPACT suite that are relevant to modeling electron linacs, namely the new 1D coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) modeling capability and the integrated Green's function (IFG) algorithm for modeling high aspect ratio beams. In addition, we present initial results of application of the enhanced version of IMPACT-Z to high-fidelity modeling of the microbunching instability in a realistic light source lattice.
Date: February 13, 2008
Creator: Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.; /LBL, Berkeley et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simulation of the Microbunching Instability in Beam Delivery Systems for Free Electron Lasers

Description: In this paper, we examine the growth of the microbunching instability in the electron beam delivery system of a free electron laser (FEL). We present the results of two sets of simulations, one conducted using a direct Vlasov solver, the other using a particle-in-cell code Impact-Z with the number of simulation macroparticles ranging up to 100 million. Discussion is focused on the details of longitudinal dynamics and on numerical values of uncorrelated (slice) energy spread at different points in the lattice. In particular, we assess the efficacy of laser heater in suppression of the instability, and look at the interplay between physical and numerical noise in particle-based simulations.
Date: November 2, 2007
Creator: Pogorelov, I.; U., /Northern Illinois; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FERMI&Elettra Accelerator Technical Optimization FinalReport

Description: This report describes the accelerator physics aspects, theengineering considerations and the choice of parameters that led to theaccelerator design of the FERMI Free-Electron-Laser. The accelerator(also called the "electron beam delivery system") covers the region fromthe exit of the injector to the entrance of the first FEL undulator. Theconsiderations that led to the proposed configuration were made on thebasis of a study that explored various options and performance limits.This work follows previous studies of x-ray FEL facilities (SLAC LCLS[1], DESY XFEL [2], PAL XFEL [3], MIT [4], BESSY FEL[5], LBNL LUX [6],Daresbury 4GLS [7]) and integrates many of the ideas that were developedthere. Several issues specific to harmonic cascade FELs, and that had notyet been comprehensively studied, were also encountered and tackled. Aparticularly difficult issue was the need to meet the requirement forhigh peak current and small slice energy spread, as the specification forthe ratio of these two parameters (that defines the peak brightness ofthe electron beam) is almost a factor of two higher than that of theLCLS's SASE FEL. Another challenging aspect was the demand to produce anelectron beam with as uniform as possible peak current and energydistributions along the bunch, a condition that was met by introducingnovel beam dynamics techniques. Part of the challenge was due to the factthat there were no readily available computational tools to carry outreliable calculations, and these had to be developed. Most of theinformation reported in this study is available in the form of scientificpublications, and is partly reproduced here for the convenience of thereader.
Date: July 1, 2006
Creator: Cornacchia, M.; Craievich, P.; Di Mitri, S.; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Venturini, M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wavelet-based Poisson Solver for use in Particle-In-CellSimulations

Description: We report on a successful implementation of a wavelet based Poisson solver for use in 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. One new aspect of our algorithm is its ability to treat the general(inhomogeneous) Dirichlet boundary conditions (BCs). The solver harnesses advantages afforded by the wavelet formulation, such as sparsity of operators and data sets, existence of effective preconditioners, and the ability simultaneously to remove numerical noise and further compress relevant data sets. Having tested our method as a stand-alone solver on two model problems, we merged it into IMPACT-T to obtain a fully functional serial PIC code. We present and discuss preliminary results of application of the new code to the modeling of the Fermilab/NICADD and AES/JLab photoinjectors.
Date: May 13, 2005
Creator: Terzic, B.; Mihalcea, D.; Bohn, C.L. & Pogorelov, I.V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FERMI&Elettra Accelerator Technical Optimization Final Report

Description: This chapter describes the accelerator physics aspects, the engineering considerations and the choice of parameters that led to the accelerator design of the FERMI Free-Electron-Laser. The accelerator (also called the ''electron beam delivery system'') covers the region from the exit of the injector to the entrance of the first FEL undulator. The considerations that led to the proposed configuration were made on the basis of a study that explored various options and performance limits. This work follows previous studies of x-ray FEL facilities (SLAC LCLS [1], DESY XFEL [2], PAL XFEL [3], MIT [4], BESSY FEL [5], LBNL LUX [6], Daresbury 4GLS [7]) and integrates many of the ideas that were developed there. Several issues specific to harmonic cascade FELs, and that had not yet been comprehensively studied, were also encountered and tackled. A particularly difficult issue was the need to meet the requirement for high peak current and small slice energy spread, as the specification for the ratio of these two parameters (that defines the peak brightness of the electron beam) is almost a factor of two higher than that of the LCLS's SASE FEL. Another challenging aspect was the demand to produce an electron beam with as uniform as possible peak current and energy distributions along the bunch, a condition that was met by introducing novel beam dynamics techniques. Part of the challenge was due to the fact that there were no readily available computational tools to carry out reliable calculations, and these had to be developed. Most of the information reported in this study is available in the form of scientific publications, and is partly reproduced here for the convenience of the reader.
Date: April 30, 2007
Creator: Cornacchia, M.; Craievich, P.; Di Mitri, S.; Trieste, /Sincrotrone; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recent Progress on the Marylie/Impact Beam Dynamics Code

Description: MARYLIE/IMPACT (ML/I) is a hybrid code that combines the beam optics capabilities of MARYLIE with the parallel Particle-In-Cell capabilities of IMPACT. In addition to combining the capabilities of these codes, ML/I has a number of powerful features, including a choice of Poisson solvers, a fifth-order rf cavity model, multiple reference particles for rf cavities, a library of soft-edge magnet models, representation of magnet systems in terms of coil stacks with possibly overlapping fields, and wakefield effects. The code allows for map production, map analysis, particle tracking, and 3D envelope tracking, all within a single, coherent user environment. ML/I has a front end that can read both MARYLIE input and MAD lattice descriptions. The code can model beams with or without acceleration, and with or without space charge. Developed under a US DOE Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) project, ML/I is well suited to large-scale modeling, simulations having been performed with up to 100M macroparticles. The code inherits the powerful fitting and optimizing capabilities of MARYLIE augmented for the new features of ML/I. The combination of soft-edge magnet models, high-order capability, space charge effects, and fitting/optimization capabilities, make ML/I a powerful code for a wide range of beam optics design problems. This paper provides a description of the code and its unique capabilities.
Date: December 6, 2006
Creator: Ryne, R.D.; Qiang, J.; Bethel, E.W.; Pogorelov, I.; Shalf, J.; Siegerist, C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FEL Design Studies at LBNL: Activities and Plans

Description: LBNL staff are currently pursuing R&D for future x-ray FELs, and participate in two FEL construction projects. Our strategy is to address the most fundamental challenges, which are the cost-drivers and performance limitations of FEL facilities. An internally funded R&D program is aimed at investigating accelerator physics and technologies in three key areas: (1) Theoretical study, modeling, and experimental development of low emittance, high quantum efficiency cathodes; (2) Design studies of electron beam delivery systems, including emittance manipulations, high-resolution modeling of 6-D phase space, and low-emittance beam transport; and (3) Design studies of optical manipulations of electron beams for seeded and SASE FELs, providing short x-ray pulses of variable duration, synchronous with the seed and pump laser sources, and also long transform-limited pulses with a narrow bandwidth. Design studies of means for production of attosecond x-ray pulses at various wavelengths. We are collaborators in the FERMI{at}Elettra seeded FEL facility under construction at Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy, participating in accelerator design and FEL physics studies, and mechanical and electrical engineering. We are participating in the LCLS project at SLAC, implementing our design of stabilized timing and synchronization systems. Here we outline our long-term objectives, and current activities.
Date: March 1, 2007
Creator: Corlett, John N.; Fawley, W.; Lidia, S.; Padmore, H.; Penn, G.; Pogorelov, I. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A HIGH REPETITION RATE VUV-SOFT X-RAY FEL CONCEPT

Description: We report on design studies for a seeded FEL light source that is responsive to the scientific needs of the future. The FEL process increases radiation flux by several orders of magnitude above existing incoherent sources, and offers the additional enhancements attainable by optical manipulations of the electron beam: control of the temporal duration and bandwidth of the coherent output, reduced gain length in the FEL, utilization of harmonics to attain shorter wavelengths, and precise synchronization of the x-ray pulse with seed laser systems. We describe an FEL facility concept based on a high repetition rate RF photocathode gun, that would allow simultaneous operation of multiple independent FEL's, each producing high average brightness, tunable over the VUV-soft x-ray range, and each with individual performance characteristics determined by the configuration of the FEL. SASE, enhanced-SASE (ESASE), seeded, harmonic generation, and other configurations making use of optical manipulations of the electron beam may be employed, providing a wide range of photon beam properties to meet varied user demands.
Date: June 24, 2007
Creator: Corlett, J.; Byrd, J.; Fawley, W.M.; Gullans, M.; Li, D.; Lidia,S.M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design Studies for a High-Repetition-Rate FEL Facility at LBNL.

Description: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working to address the needs of the primary scientific Grand Challenges now being considered by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences: we are exploring scientific discovery opportunities, and new areas of science, to be unlocked with the use of advanced photon sources. A partnership of several divisions at LBNL is working to define the science and instruments needed in the future. To meet these needs, we propose a seeded, high-repetition-rate, free-electron laser (FEL) facility. Temporally and spatially coherent photon pulses, of controlled duration ranging from picosecond to sub-femtosecond, are within reach in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) to soft X-ray regime, and LBNL is developing critical accelerator physics and technologies toward this goal. We envision a facility with an array of FELs, each independently configurable and tunable, providing a range of photon-beam properties with high average and peak flux and brightness.
Date: October 4, 2007
Creator: CORLETT, J.; BELKACEM, A.; BYRD, J. M.; FAWLEY, W.; KIRZ, J.; LIDIA, S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SciDAC Advances and Applications in Computational Beam Dynamics

Description: SciDAC has had a major impact on computational beam dynamics and the design of particle accelerators. Particle accelerators--which account for half of the facilities in the DOE Office of Science Facilities for the Future of Science 20 Year Outlook--are crucial for US scientific, industrial, and economic competitiveness. Thanks to SciDAC, accelerator design calculations that were once thought impossible are now carried routinely, and new challenging and important calculations are within reach. SciDAC accelerator modeling codes are being used to get the most science out of existing facilities, to produce optimal designs for future facilities, and to explore advanced accelerator concepts that may hold the key to qualitatively new ways of accelerating charged particle beams. In this poster we present highlights from the SciDAC Accelerator Science and Technology (AST) project Beam Dynamics focus area in regard to algorithm development, software development, and applications.
Date: June 26, 2005
Creator: Ryne, R.; Abell, D.; Adelmann, A.; Amundson, J.; Bohn, C.; Cary, J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department