34 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Principal facts for a gravity survey of the Fly Ranch Extension Known Geothermal Resource Area, Pershing County, Nevada

Description: During July 1977, forty-four gravity stations were obtained in the Fly Ranch Extension Known Geothermal Resource Area and vicinity, northwestern Nevada. The gravity observations were made with a Worden gravimeter having a scale factor of about 0.5 milligal per division. No terrain corrections have been applied to these data. The earth tide correction was not used in drift reduction. The Geodetic Reference System 1967 formula (International Association of Geodesy, 1967) was used to compute theoretical gravity. Observed gravity is referenced to a base station in Gerlach, Nevada, having a value based on the Potsdam System of 1930 (fig. 1). A density of 2.67 g per cm/sup 3/ was used in computing the Bouguer anomaly.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Peterson, D.L. & Kaufmann, H.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Principal facts for a gravity survey of the Gerlach Extension Known Geothermal Resource Area, Pershing County, Nevada

Description: During July 1977, fifty-one gravity stations were obtained in the Gerlach Extension Known Geothermal Resource Area and vicinity, northwestern Nevada. The gravity observations were made with a Worden gravimeter having a scale factor of about 0.5 milligal per division. No terrain corrections have been applied to these data. The earth tide correction was not used in drift reduction. The Geodetic Reference System 1967 formula (International Association of Geodesy, 1967) was used to compute theoretical gravity. Observed gravity is referenced to a base station in Gerlach, Nevada, having a value based on the Potsdam System of 1930. A density of 2.67 g per cm/sup 3/ was used in computing the Bouguer anomaly.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Peterson, D.L. & Kaufmann, H.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Principal facts for a gravity survey of the Double Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area, Humboldt County, Nevada

Description: During July 1977, forty-nine gravity stations were obtained in the Double Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area and vicinity, northwestern Nevada. The gravity observations were made with a Worden gravimeter having a scale factor of about 0.5 milligal per division. No terrain corrections have been applied to these data. The earth tide correction was not used in drift reduction. The Geodetic Reference System 1967 formula (International Association of Geodesy, 1967) was used to compute theoretical gravity.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Peterson, D.L. & Kaufmann, H.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Principal Facts for a Gravity Survey of Baltazor Known Geothermal Resource Area, Nevada

Description: The data presented are referenced to a gravity base station in Denio, Nevada at the Post Office, 50 meters south of the Oregon-Nevada State line, 1.6 meters south of the door in the southeast corner of the concrete porch, near the mailbox. Site is monumented with a ''USAF Gravity Station'' disc (A.C.I.C. reference number 2352-1). Base value is 979945.94.
Date: January 1, 1977
Creator: Peterson, D. L. & Hoover, D. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Greater confinement disposal program at the Savannah River Plant

Description: The first facility to demonstrate Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) in a humid environment in the United States has been built and is operating at the Savannah River Plant. GCD practices of waste segregation, packaging, emplacement below the root zone, and waste stabilization are being used in the demonstration. Activity concentrations to select wastes for GCD are based on a study of SRP burial records, and are equal to or less than those for Class B waste in 10CFR61. The first disposal units to be constructed are 9-foot diameter, thirty-foot deep boreholes which will be used to dispose of wastes from production reactors, tritiated wastes, and selected wastes from off-site. In 1984 an engineered GCD trench will be constructed for disposal of boxed wastes and large bulky items. 2 figures, 1 table.
Date: January 1, 1984
Creator: Cook, J R; Towler, O A; Peterson, D L; Johnson, G M & Helton, B D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radiation environments produced by plasma Z-pinch stagnation on central targets

Description: A goal of modern pulsed-power technology is the development of an intense, megajoule level source of soft x-rays for use in high-energy density physics experiments. Since 1980 experimental facilities, theoretical concepts, computational tools, and diagnostics have been developed that place pulsed-power at the threshold of performing experiments of great interest to the applied physics community. In this paper the ``Flying Radiation Case`` approach will be presented and its predicted performance on Sandia National Laboratory`s Z-Machine [M.K. Matzen, Phys. Plasmas 4, 1519 (1997)] is described. The effects of instability growth in the plasma during the implosion, its reassembly on a central cushion, and the plasma interactions with shaped electrodes are considered.
Date: November 1, 1997
Creator: Brownell, J.H.; Bowners, R.L.; McLenithan, K.D. & Peterson, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of 2-D simulations to hollow z-pinch implosions

Description: The application of simulations of z-pinch implosions should have at least two goals: first, to properly model the most important physical processes occurring in the pinch allowing for a better understanding of the experiments and second, provide a design capability for future experiments. Beginning with experiments fielded at Los Alamos on the Pegasus 1 and Pegasus 2 capacitor banks, the authors have developed a methodology for simulating hollow z-pinches in two dimensions which has reproduced important features of the measured experimental current drive, spectrum, radiation pulse shape, peak power and total radiated energy. This methodology employs essentially one free parameter, the initial level of the random density perturbations imposed at the beginning of the 2-D simulation, but in general no adjustments to other parameters are required. Currently the authors are applying this capability to the analysis of recent Saturn and PBFA-Z experiments. The code results provide insight into the nature of the pinch plasma prior to arrival on-axis, during thermalization and development after peak pinch time. Among other things, the simulation results provide an explanation for the production of larger amounts of radiated energy than would be expected from a simple slug-model kinetic energy analysis and the appearance of multiple peaks in the radiation power. The 2-D modeling has also been applied to the analysis of Saturn dynamic hohlraum experiments and is being used in the design of this and other Z-Pinch applications on PBFA-Z.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Peterson, D.L.; Bowers, R.L. & Brownell, J.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simulations of radiatively-driven implosions on the PBFA-Z facility

Description: We have performed two-dimensional calculations of the implosions of thin-walled aluminum cylinders driven by a source of radiation. The source is generated by the stagnation of an imploding plasma liner on to a foam target (dynamic hohlraum or flying radiation case) in the PBFA-Z facility at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Both Lagrangian and Eulerian codes are used for the simulations of the compression of the shell by the ablatively-driven main shock.
Date: November 1, 1997
Creator: Aubrey, J.B.; Bowers, R.L. & Peterson, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Instabilities in foil implosions and the effect of radiation output

Description: One of the aims of the Athena program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is the generation of a high fluence of soft x-rays from the thermalization of an radially imploding foil. In the experiments in Athena program, a large axial current is passed through a cylindrical aluminum foil. Under the action of the Lorentz force, the resulting plasma accelerates toward the axis, thermalizes, and produces a fast soft x-ray pulse with a blackbody temperature up to several hundred electron volts. In order that there be the maximum power compression and the highest x-ray fluence and temperature, the plasma stagnation on axis must occur very promptly. This requires that the imploding plasma be as thin and symmetric as possible. A serious problem in the thermalization process is the formation of instabilities in the plasma due to the self-magnetic field that governs the implosion of foil. A large diagnostic effort was developed to capture the details of the implosion and instability growth in several foil implosion experiments. In this report, we will present visible light images and x-ray data designed to study the effects of foil mass, current, and initial perturbations on the instability growth during foil implosion. Representative data is presented from several experiments using the Pegasus capacitor bank system and the explosively driven Procyon system. These experiments are labeled Peg 25 and Peg 33 for the Pegasus experiments and PDD1, PDD2 and PRF0 for the Procyon experiments. In these experiments, all foils had radii of 5 centimeters but varied in mass and initial conditions. Experimental data from several shots were compared with each other and to a radiation magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) computation and described in a separate paper.
Date: August 1, 1995
Creator: Oona, H.; Peterson, D.L. & Goforth, J.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calculational evaluation of plasma flow switches for the Los Alamos Foil Implosion Project

Description: The next system design under consideration for the Los Alamos Foil Implosion Project (Trailmaster) is projected to deliver in excess of 15 MA of electrical current produced by high-explosive driven flux compression generators to a foil load. A plasma flow switch is being investigated as the final pulse shaping step in this system. The performance of these switches is being evaluated using a wide variety of computational tools including zero-, one- and two-dimensional MHD codes and a 3-D view-factor radiation transport code. We are concerned with the effects of radiation from the switch plasma prior to switching current to the load, and the interaction of the switch plasma on existing perturbations and as a source of perturbation on the imploding load. 4 refs. 6 figs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Greene, A.E.; Bowers, R.L.; Oliphant, T.A.; Peterson, D.L. & Weiss, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multiplicity sorter for shift-register coincidence electronics

Description: A multiplicity sorter for the latest Los Alamos National Laboratory version of shift-register coincidence electronics is described. The multiplicity information taken from the coincidence-gate up-down counter is decoded and gated onto the output lines by prompt real-plus-accidental (R+A) and delayed accidental (A) strobes. Multiplicities of 0-7 and greater than or equal to 8 are sorted for both the R+A and A gates.
Date: February 1, 1982
Creator: Swansen, J.E.; Collinsworth, P.R.; Krick, M.S. & Peterson, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plasma flow switch characterization for the Los Alamos Foil Implosion Project

Description: The next system design under consideration for the Los Alamos Foil Implosion Project is projected to deliver tens of mega-amperes of electrical current produced by high-explosive driven flux compression generators on a time scale of about one microsecond to a load foil. The use of such generators, with time scales of order several tenths of a millisecond, leads to considerable pulse shaping problems. Previously it was noted that a commutating switch might serve as an efficient alternative to a closing switch in transferring current from a coaxial transmission line to a cylindrically imploding load. Research at the Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL) has met with considerable success in efficiently transferring currents of order 10 MA to an imploding liner using the plasma flow switch concept (PFS). Besides efficiently transferring current, the plasma flow switch protects the load region from high voltages generated by an opening switch until the current is present to provide magnetic insulation. For these reasons, a PFS is being investigated as the final pulse shaping step in the design. A series of capacitor bank experiments is also being fielded to help investigate physics issues and to benchmark the codes. 4 refs., 7 figs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Bowers, R.L.; Brownell, J.H.; Greene, A.E. & Peterson, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

On the transparency of foam in low-density foam Z-pinch experiments

Description: Foam Z-pinch experiments have been performed on the SATURN and Z machines at Sandia National Laboratories to study physics issues related to x-ray radiation generation and inertial confinement fusion. A significant issue for foam Z-pinch experiments is the transparency of the heated foam as a function of time and wavelength. Foam transparency will be important in future foam Z-pinch experiments both because it influences the time-dependent radiation field seen by an ICF capsule embedded in the foam, and because it is an important factor in making high-resolution spectral measurements of a capsule or tracers embedded in the foam. In this paper, the authors describe results from simulations and experiments which address the issue of foam transparency. They discuss imaging data from one Z experiment in which x-ray emission from a half-Au/half-CH disk located at the bottom of a 1 cm-tall, 14 mg/cc TPX foam is observed. Simulation results predicting CH foam optical depths as a function of plasma conditions are presented. In addition, the authors present results from spectral calculations which utilize 2-D MHD simulation predictions for the time-dependent foam conditions. The results indicate that the observed x-ray framing camera images are consistent with early-time (several ns prior to stagnation) foam electron temperatures of {approx_gt} 30 eV, which is somewhat hotter than the foam electron temperatures predicted from the 2-D MHD simulations at early times.
Date: December 31, 1998
Creator: MacFarlane, J.J.; Derzon, M.S.; Nash, T.J.; Chandler, G.A. & Peterson, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

How do plasma flow switches scale with current? Issues in the 6 MA to 30 MA regime

Description: Point mass calculations are used to model switched implosions on several pulsed power machines. The model includes a lumped circuit representation of the pulsed power source. A simple switching model is used to describe a standard plasma flow switch. Implosion kinetic energies are obtained at a convergence ratio of 20 to 1. Heuristic arguments are used to estimate the plasma temperature at pinch, the total x-ray output and the radiation pulse width. Switched models are presented for Pegasus II, Shiva Star, Procyon and Atlas.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Bowers, R.L.; Greene, A.E.; Nakafuji, G.; Peterson, D.L. & Roderick, N.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Computational simulations of plasma flow switches and imploding loads

Description: The Procyon system in the Los Alamos Trailmaster foil implosion project is intended to produce soft x-ray radiation by delivering about 1 MJ of kinetic energy to an imploding plasma liner. The final switching stage of this system will be a Plasma Flow Switch (PFS) which delivers current to the cylindrical foil load. 1-D and 2-D simulations are now being conducted to examine: the initiation of the PFS plasma: the dynamics of the PFS and its switching efficiency; the load implosion and resulting radiation output. Considered here, for the PFS and imploding load, are the effects of electrode walls, perturbations, and radiation. Comparisons with experiments (using the 1.5 MJ Pegasus capacitor bank) are also described. 5 refs., 6 figs.
Date: May 29, 1991
Creator: Peterson, D.L.; Bowers, R.L.; Brownell, J.H.; Greene, A.E. & Roderick, N.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Two-dimensional simulations of foil implosion experiments on the Los Alamos capacitor bank

Description: A number of z-pinch experiments have been conducted at Los Alamos on the Pegasus capacitor bank in which 2-cm high, 5-cm radius, thin foil loads were imploded with currents in excess of 3 MA. Two-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations of these implosions have been performed to model the implosion dynamics and subsequent generation of an x-ray pulse. Comparison of the simulation instability development with visible light framing camera photographs show good agreement and illustrate the instability evolution from short to long wavelengths and a final disruption of the imploding plasma shell. The calculations also show good agreement with experimental timing and measured current and voltage waveforms, and also reproduce features characteristic of the x-ray output. These include a broad pulsewidth, and thepresence of multiple peaks and small time scale structures, features which cannot be reproduced by one-dimensional models. X-ray spectra obtained from the calculated pinch also reproduce qualitative features inthe measured spectra.
Date: January 1, 1993
Creator: Peterson, D.L.; Bowers, R.L.; Brownell, J.H.; Greene, A.E.; Lee, H. & Matuska, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling of plasma flow switches at low, intermediate and high energies

Description: Inductively stored pulsed power technology has been used over the past thirty years to produce multi-megaamp currents to implode low inductance loads and produce x-radiation. Because of the large difference in timescales for the delivery of magnetic energy to the load and the desire for high power x-radiation output (short timescale for the implosion), most inductively stored systems require at least one opening switch. The design and understanding of fast, efficient opening switches for multi-megaamp systems represents a long standing problem in pulsed power research. The Los Alamos Foil Implosion Project uses inductively stored magnetic energy to implode thin metallic liners. A plasma flow switch (PFS) has been investigated as the final pulse shaping step for this systems. The PFS consists of a wire array and a barrier foil located upstream from the load region. Several stages can be identified in the performance of the plasma flow switch. These are: (1) the vaporization of the wire array; (2) the assembly of the initiated plasma on tie barrier foil to form the switch plasma; (3) the motion of the switch plasma down the coaxial barrel; and (4) current switching to the load (the actual switching stage). The fourth stage affects the switch's efficiency, as well as the quality of the load implosion. Instabilities may develop during any of these four stages, and their presence may seriously degrade the structure of the switch plasma. Two primary criteria may be used to characterize good switching. The first is switching efficiency. A second criterion is transferred to the load during or after switching. This paper summarizes the computational design of the PFS experiments carried out on Pegasus 1. We conclude by considering the implications of these results for the design of a PFS for the higher energy regime (Procyon) regime.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Bowers, R.L.; Brownell, J.H.; Greene, A.E.; Peterson, D.L.; Roderick, N. & Turchi, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Computational simulations of the Laguna foil implosion experiments

Description: The Los Alamos foil implosion project is intended to produce a source of intense laboratory x-radiation for physics and fusion studies. Following the Pioneer shot series, the project is now embarking on the Laguna foil implosion experiments. In this series a Mark-IX helical generator will be coupled to an explosively-formed-fuse opening switch, a surface discharge closing switch, and a vacuum power flow and load chamber. The system design will be discussed and an overview of zero-, one-, and two-dimensional MHD preshot simulations will be presented. The generator should provide more than 11 MA of which /approximately/5.5 MA will be switched to the 5-cm- radius, 2-cm-high, 250-nm-thick aluminum foil load. This should give rise to a 1.1 ..mu..s implosion with tens of kilojoules of kinetic energy. Zero-dimensional calculations serve to optimize the pulse- power system. One-dimensional, Lagrangian, MHD calculations are made to estimate temperature, densities and radiation output. The temperature and density profiles predicted by the 1-D code are used as initial conditions for our 2-D Eulerian code. The 2-D calculations predict a small amount of radiated energy from a decoupled plasma associated with Rayleigh-Taylor bubbles. This matter is predicted to have electron and ion temperatures in the keV regime as the bubble material thermalizes ahead of the bulk of the plasma.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Greene, A.E.; Bowers, R.L.; Brownell, J.H.; Oliplant, T.A.; Peterson, D.L. & Weiss, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Computational simulations of the Laguna foil implosion experiments

Description: Building on the results achieved in the Pioneer shot series, the Los Alamos foil implosion project is embarking on the Laguna foil implosion experiments. In this paper the system design is discussed and results from zero-, one-, and two-dimensional MHD preshot simulations are presented. The system will provide 5.5 MA to the 5-cm-radius, 2-cm-high, 250-nm-thick aluminum foil load. This should give rise to a 1.1 ..mu..s implosion with nearly 100 kJ of kinetic energy. 4 refs., 4 figs.
Date: January 1, 1988
Creator: Greene, A.E.; Bowers, R.L.; Brownell, J.H.; Oliphant, T.A.; Peterson, D.L. & Weiss, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling of plasma flow switches at low, intermediate and high energies

Description: Inductively stored pulsed power technology has been used over the past thirty years to produce multi-megaamp currents to implode low inductance loads and produce x-radiation. Because of the large difference in timescales for the delivery of magnetic energy to the load and the desire for high power x-radiation output (short timescale for the implosion), most inductively stored systems require at least one opening switch. The design and understanding of fast, efficient opening switches for multi-megaamp systems represents a long standing problem in pulsed power research. The Los Alamos Foil Implosion Project uses inductively stored magnetic energy to implode thin metallic liners. A plasma flow switch (PFS) has been investigated as the final pulse shaping step for this systems. The PFS consists of a wire array and a barrier foil located upstream from the load region. Several stages can be identified in the performance of the plasma flow switch. These are: (1) the vaporization of the wire array; (2) the assembly of the initiated plasma on tie barrier foil to form the switch plasma; (3) the motion of the switch plasma down the coaxial barrel; and (4) current switching to the load (the actual switching stage). The fourth stage affects the switch`s efficiency, as well as the quality of the load implosion. Instabilities may develop during any of these four stages, and their presence may seriously degrade the structure of the switch plasma. Two primary criteria may be used to characterize good switching. The first is switching efficiency. A second criterion is transferred to the load during or after switching. This paper summarizes the computational design of the PFS experiments carried out on Pegasus 1. We conclude by considering the implications of these results for the design of a PFS for the higher energy regime (Procyon) regime.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Bowers, R. L.; Brownell, J. H.; Greene, A. E.; Peterson, D. L.; Roderick, N. & Turchi, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Two-dimensional simulations of foil implosion experiments on the Los Alamos capacitor bank

Description: A number of z-pinch experiments have been conducted at Los Alamos on the Pegasus capacitor bank in which 2-cm high, 5-cm radius, thin foil loads were imploded with currents in excess of 3 MA. Two-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations of these implosions have been performed to model the implosion dynamics and subsequent generation of an x-ray pulse. Comparison of the simulation instability development with visible light framing camera photographs show good agreement and illustrate the instability evolution from short to long wavelengths and a final disruption of the imploding plasma shell. The calculations also show good agreement with experimental timing and measured current and voltage waveforms, and also reproduce features characteristic of the x-ray output. These include a broad pulsewidth, and thepresence of multiple peaks and small time scale structures, features which cannot be reproduced by one-dimensional models. X-ray spectra obtained from the calculated pinch also reproduce qualitative features inthe measured spectra.
Date: May 1, 1993
Creator: Peterson, D. L.; Bowers, R. L.; Brownell, J. H.; Greene, A. E.; Lee, H. & Matuska, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simulations of the radiation-flow within a silica-aerogel target

Description: We propose to field a series of experiments to study the flow of radiation through silica-aerogel targets. The soft x-rays are generated by the Z-machine at Sandia National Laboratories. We have completed simulations of the experiments using 2-D Lagrangian and Eulerian codes. The results of the calculations for one of the targets are presented here.
Date: January 1, 2002
Creator: Aubrey, J. B. (Joysree B.); Wood, B. P. (Blake P.); Peterson, D. L. (Darrell L.) & Kyrala, George A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Physics of Long-Pulse Wire Array Z-Pinch Implosions

Description: Recent improvements in z-pinch wire array load design at Sandia National Laboratories have led to a substantial increase in pinch performance as measured by radiated powers of up to 280 TW in 4 ns and 1.8 MJ of total radiated energy. Next generation, higher current machines will allow for larger mass arrays and comparable or higher velocity implosions to be reached, possibly extending these result.dis the current is pushed above 20 MA, conventional machine design based on a 100 ns implosion time results in higher voltages, hence higher cost and power flow risk. Another approach, which shifts the risk to the load configuration, is to increase the implosion time to minimize the voltage. This approach is being investigated in a series of experimental campaigns on the Saturn and Z machines. In this paper, both experimental and two dimensional computational modeling of the fist long implosion Z experiments will be presented. The experimental data shows broader pulses, lower powers, and larger pinch diameters compared to the corresponding short pulse data. By employing a nested array configuration, the pinch diameter was reduced by 50% with a corresponding increase in power of > 30%. Numerical simulations suggest load velocity is the dominating mechanism behind these results.
Date: December 14, 1999
Creator: DOUGLAS,MELISSA R.; DEENEY,CHRISTOPHER; SPIELMAN,RICK B.; COVERDALE,CHRISTINE A.; RODERICK,N.F. & PETERSON,D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison and analysis of 2-D simulation results with two implosion radiation experiments on the Los Alamos Pegasus I and Pegasus II capacitor banks

Description: Two experiments, PegI-41, conducted on the Los Alamos Pegasus I capacitor bank, and PegII-25, on the Pegasus II bank, consisted of the implosions of 13 mg (nominal), 5 cm radius, 2 cm high thin cylindrical aluminum foils resulting in soft x-ray radiation pulses from the plasma thermalization on axis. The implosions were conducted in direct-drive (no intermediate switching) mode with peak currents of about 4 MA and 5 MA respectively, and implosion times of about 2.5 {micro}s and 2.0 {micro}s. A radiation yield of about 250 kJ was measured for PegII-25. The purpose of these experiments was to examine the physics of the implosion and relate this physics to the production of the radiation pulse and to provide detailed experimental data which could be compared with 2-D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations. Included in the experimental diagnostic suites were faraday rotation and dB/dt current measurements, a visible framing camera, an x-ray stripline camera, time-dependent spectroscopy, bolometers and XRD`S. A comparison of the results from these experiments shows agreement with 2-D simulation results in the instability development, current, and radiation pulse data, including the pulsewidth, shape, peak power and total radiation yield as measured by bolometry. Instabilities dominate the behavior of the implosion and largely determine the properties of the resulting radiation pulse. The 2-D simulations can be seen to be an important tool in understanding the implosion physics.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Peterson, D.L.; Bowers, R.L.; Lebeda, C.F.; Matuska, W.; Benage, J.; Idzorek, G. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department