9 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Demonstration of high-resolution inverse VSP for reservoir characterization applications

Description: The objective of this project is the determination of inverse vertical seismic profiling (VSP) measurements using new experimental field instrumentation capable of providing at least an order of magnitude improvement in the resolution of structural details in comparison with conventional seismic images. This two-year project will entail instrumentation tests under controlled field conditions during the first year followed by full-scale field demonstration tests in a representative oil-bearing reservoir formation during the second year. An automatic time-picking program and a tomographic inversion program developed for processing interwell seismic data were generalized for processing reverse VSP data. A technical paper was submitted for publication to Geophysics. The paper is entitled; A Wax-Embedded Borehole Seismic Detector for High-Resolution Measurements.'' A copy of this manuscript is enclosed in the Appendix. 3 figs., 1 tab.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Parra, J.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis and evaluation of interwell seismic logging techniques for reservoir characterization. [Quarterly report], January 1--March 31, 1993

Description: The objective of this three-year research program is to investigate interwell seismic logging techniques for indirectly interpreting oil and gas reservoir geology and pore fluid permeability. This work involves a balanced study of advanced theoretical and numerical modeling of seismic waves transmitted between pairs of reservoir wells combined with experimental data acquisition and processing of measurements at controlled sites as well as in full-scale reservoirs. This reservoir probing concept is aimed at demonstrating unprecedented high-resolution measurements and detailed interpretation of heterogeneous hydrocarbon-bearing formations. Technical progress for the past quarter is summarized for Task 3, data processing and analysis of geological and petrophysical analysis of the interval from 800 to 1100 feet in five wells at the Gypsy Test Site.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Parra, J.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis and evaluation of interwell seismic logging techniques for reservoir characterization. [Quarterly report], April 1--June 30, 1992

Description: The objective of this three-year research program is to investigate interwell seismic logging techniques for indirectly interpreting oil and gas reservoir geology and pore fluid permeability. This work involves a balanced study of advanced theoretical and numerical modeling of seismic waves transmitted between pairs of reservoir wells combined with experimental data acquisition and processing of measurements at controlled sites as well as in full-scale reservoirs. This reservoir probing concept is, aimed at demonstrating unprecedented high-resolution measurements and detailed interpretation of heterogeneous hydrocarbon-bearing formations. Part of the numerical model task is to investigate the sensitivity of the in-situ rock-physical properties of the formation such as porosity and permeability on three-component seismograms, and the pressure, as well as phase velocity and attenuation. For this purpose we have developed software to simulate synthetic seismograins associated with a point-source (compressional wave), and a point force (shear wave), in stratified fluid-filled porous media. In addition, we have developed software to calculate phase velocity and attenuation from interwell seismic waveforms. To demonstrate the use of these capabilities we present examples to simulate seismograms and dispersion and attenuation curves.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Parra, J. O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis and evaluation of interwell seismic logging techniques for reservoir characterization. [Quarterly report], July 1--September 30, 1992

Description: The objective of this three-year research program is to investigate interwell seismic logging techniques for indirectly interpreting oil and gas reservoir geology and pore fluid permeability. This work involves a balanced study of advanced theoretical and numerical modeling of seismic waves transmitted between pairs of reservoir wells combined with experimental data acquisition and processing of measurements at controlled sites as well as in full-scale reservoirs. This reservoir probing concept is aimed at demonstrating unprecedented high-resolution measurements and detailed interpretation of heterogeneous hydrocarbon-bearing formations. Progress reports are presented by Task 3 conduct full-scale experimental field test and Task 4 data processing studies. For Task 3, interwell seismic experiments were conducted in the month of September at the University of Oklahoma Gypsy test site which is located in Pawnee County, Oklahoma. During the field test a full suite of interwell seismic data were acquired and will be used to extract rock porosity and permeability. In particular, interwell seismic experiments were conducted using two borehole hydrophone arrays (streamers) consisting of twelve detector channels (i.e., simultaneous source-to-detector measurements were made in two boreholes pairs having different separation distances) for source-independent seismic attenuation and dispersion studies.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Parra, J.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis and evaluation of interwell seismic logging techniques for reservoir characterization. [Quarterly report], April 1--June 30, 1993

Description: The objective of this three-year research program is to investigate interwell seismic logging techniques for indirectly interpreting oil and gas reservoir geology and rock physical properties. This work involves a balanced study of advanced theoretical and numerical modeling of seismic waves transmitted between pairs of reservoir wells combined with experimental dam acquisition and processing of measurements at controlled sites as well as in full-scale reservoirs. This reservoir probing concept is aimed at demonstrating high-resolution measurements and detailed interpretation of heterogeneous hydrocarbon-bearing formations. In this quarterly report technical progress is summarized for Task 3, data processing and analysis of: preliminary interpretation of interwell seismic data from wells 5-7 and 7-7 at the Gypsy Test Site; and the response of a thin layer in an anistropic shale.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Parra, J.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

Description: The objective of this project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate magnetic resonance (MR) techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in two hydrocarbon reservoirs. This was accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using MR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurements were compared with petrographic analysis results to determine the relative roles of petrographic elements such as porosity type, mineralogy, texture, and distribution of clay and cement in creating permeability heterogeneity.
Date: January 26, 2001
Creator: Parra, J.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of fracture reservoirs using static and dynamic data: From sonic and 3D seismic to permeability distribution. Annual report, March 1, 1996--February 28, 1997

Description: In low porosity, low permeability zones, natural fractures are the primary source of permeability which affect both production and injection of fluids. The open fractures do not contribute much to porosity, but they provide an increased drainage network to any porosity. They also may connect the borehole to remote zones of better reservoir characteristics. An important approach to characterizing the fracture orientation and fracture permeability of reservoir formations is one based on the effects of such conditions on the propagation of acoustic and seismic waves in the rock. The project is a study directed toward the evaluation of acoustic logging and 3D-seismic measurement techniques as well as fluid flow and transport methods for mapping permeability anisotropy and other petrophysical parameters for the understanding of the reservoir fracture systems and associated fluid dynamics. The principal application of these measurement techniques and methods is to identify and investigate the propagation characteristics of acoustic and seismic waves in the Twin Creek hydrocarbon reservoir owned by Union Pacific Resources (UPR) and to characterize the fracture permeability distribution using production data. This site is located in the overthrust area of Utah and Wyoming. UPR drilled six horizontal wells, and presently UPR has two rigs running with many established drill hole locations. In addition, there are numerous vertical wells that exist in the area as well as 3D seismic surveys. Each horizontal well contains full FMS logs and MWD logs, gamma logs, etc.
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Parra, J.O.; Collier, H.A. & Owen, T.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reverse VSP and crosswell seismic imaging at the Savannah River Site

Description: Analysis of crosswell and three-component seismic data integrated with well logs have produced information on the distribution of subsurface heterogeneities below the In-Tank Precipitation facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The travel time P-wave tomogram and reflection imaging delineate lateral and vertical structural details of the formations. In particular, the high-resolution P-wave tomogram captures a low-velocity zone within the carbonates. This zone is surrounded by reflection events between depths of 150 and 200 ft. in the reflection imaging. The reflections are caused by the acoustic impedance contrast between the low velocity zone of `soupy` sand mixtures of unconsolidated materials and the more rigid and dense competent surrounded medium. The time-frequency analysis of full waveforms particle velocity identifies guided waves in form of leaky and normal modes at the depths of about 138 to 150 ft. This resulting change in lithology associated with the presence of guided waves is consistent with a velocity low observed in the vertical velocity profile determined from the inversion of three-component seismic data. This low-velocity zone intercepted by the wells H-BOR-34 and H-BOR-50 correlates with the conductive Griffins Landing Member, which is located above the carbonates. The result of the experiments demonstrate that the present high-resolution crosswell seismic measurement technique (using frequencies up to 1500 Hz) meets the resolution requirements to map geological and geotechnical targets in the vicinity of the In-Tank Precipitation facility at the Savannah River Site
Date: February 27, 1996
Creator: Cumbest, R.J.; Parra, J.O.; Zook, B.J.; Addington, C. & Price, V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of fracture reservoirs using static and dynamic data: From sonic and 3D seismic to permeability distribution

Description: To characterize the Buena Vista Hills field, the authors have implemented methods of modeling, processing and interpretation. The modeling methods are based on deterministic and stochastic solutions. Deterministic solutions were developed in Phase 1 and applied in Phase 2 to simulate acoustic responses of laminated reservoirs. Specifically, the simulations were aimed at implementing processing techniques to correct P-wave and S-wave velocity logs for scattering effects caused by thin layering. The authors are also including a summary of the theory and the processing steps of this new method for predicting intrinsic dispersion and attenuation in Section 2. Since the objective for correcting velocity scattering effects is to predict intrinsic dispersion from velocity data, they are presenting an application to illustrate how to relate permeability anisotropy with intrinsic dispersion. Also, the theoretical solution for calculating full waveform dipole sonic that was developed in Phase 1 was applied to simulate dipole responses at different azimuthal source orientations. The results will be used to interpret the effects of anisotropy associated with the presence of vertical fractures at Buena Vista Hills. The results of the integration of core, well logs, and geology of Buena Vista Hills is also given in Section 2. The results of this integration will be considered as the input model for the inversion technique for processing production data. Section 3 summarizes accomplishments. In Section 4 the authors present a summary of the technology transfer and promotion efforts associated with this project. In the last section, they address the work to be done in the next six months and future work by applying the processing, modeling and inversion techniques developed in Phases 1 and 2 of this project.
Date: October 1, 1998
Creator: Parra, J.O.; Hackett, C.L.; Brown, R.L.; Collier, H.A. & Datta-Gupta, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department