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STOMP Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases Version 2.0 Theory Guide

Description: The U. S. Department of Energy, through the Office of Technology Development, has requested the demonstration of remediation technologies for the cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated radionuclides within the soil and groundwater at arid sites. This demonstration program, called the VOC-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration Program (Arid-ID), has been initially directed at a volume of unsaturated and saturated soil contaminated with carbon tetrachloride, on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. A principal subtask of the Arid-ID program involves the development of an integrated engineering simulator for evaluating the effectiveness and efficiency of various remediation technologies. The engineering simulator's intended users include scientists and engineers who are investigating subsurface phenomena associated with remediation technologies. Principal design goals for the engineer simulator include broad applicability, verified algorithms, quality assurance controls, and validated simulations against laboratory and field-scale experiments. An important goal for the simulator development subtask involves the ability to scale laboratory and field-scale experiments to full-scale remediation technologies, and to transfer acquired technology to other arid sites. The STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator has been developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory(a) for modeling remediation technologies. Information on the use, application, and theoretical basis of the STOMP simulator are documented in three companion guide manuals. This manual, the Theory Guide (Version 2.0), provides the most recent theory and discussions on the governing equations, constitutive relations, and numerical solution algorithms for the STOMP simulator. The STOMP simulator's fundamental purpose is to produce numerical predictions of thermal and hydrogeologic flow and transport phenomena in variably saturated subsurface environments, which are contaminated with volatile or nonvolatile organic compounds. Auxiliary applications include numerical predictions of solute transport processes including radioactive chain decay processes. Quantitative predictions from the STOMP simulator are generated from the numerical solution of partial differential equations that describe subsurface ...
Date: March 1, 2000
Creator: White, M D & Oostrom, M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

STOMP, Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases, theory guide

Description: This guide describes the simulator`s governing equations, constitutive functions and numerical solution algorithms of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator, a scientific tool for analyzing multiple phase subsurface flow and transport. The STOMP simulator`s fundamental purpose is to produce numerical predictions of thermal and hydrologic flow and transport phenomena in variably saturated subsurface environments, which are contaminated with volatile or nonvolatile organic compounds. Auxiliary applications include numerical predictions of solute transport processes including radioactive chain decay processes. In writing these guides for the STOMP simulator, the authors have assumed that the reader comprehends concepts and theories associated with multiple-phase hydrology, heat transfer, thermodynamics, radioactive chain decay, and nonhysteretic relative permeability, saturation-capillary pressure constitutive functions. The authors further assume that the reader is familiar with the computing environment on which they plan to compile and execute the STOMP simulator. The STOMP simulator requires an ANSI FORTRAN 77 compiler to generate an executable code. The memory requirements for executing the simulator are dependent on the complexity of physical system to be modeled and the size and dimensionality of the computational domain. Likewise execution speed depends on the problem complexity, size and dimensionality of the computational domain, and computer performance. One-dimensional problems of moderate complexity can be solved on conventional desktop computers, but multidimensional problems involving complex flow and transport phenomena typically require the power and memory capabilities of workstation or mainframe type computer systems.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: White, M. D. & Oostrom, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Partitioning tracers for in situ detection and quantification of dense nonaqueous phase liquids in groundwater systems. 1998 annual progress report

Description: 'The overall goal of the proposed project is to explore the use of an innovative in-situ method for the detection and quantification of dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in water-saturated and unsaturated heterogeneous media. Effective risk assessment and remediation of DNAPL contaminated sites is constrained by the limitations of current site characterization techniques. A major weakness of the current methods is that they provide data at discrete points, such that the probability of sampling a zone of localized DNAPL is quite small. The results of the proposed research will lead to improved techniques for characterizing DNAPL contaminated sites and will enhance the understanding of the distribution of DNAPLs in the subsurface. The use of this methods will reduce the uncertainty associated with risk assessments and remediation planning. The project objectives include exploring partitioning tracers for the detection and quantification of DNAPLs in saturated systems using aqueous tracers and in unsaturated systems using gas-phase tracers. This report summarizes work completed mid-way through year 2 of a 3-year project. Batch experiments have been conducted for a suite of bulk-phase partitioning tracers to determine water- trichloroethene (TCE) partitioning coefficients. Interfacial tension measurements have been made between TCE and solutions of several potential interface partitioning tracers. Preliminary column experiments have been conducted for the aqueous bulk-phase partitioning tracers using columns packed with a homogeneous sand and containing a residual saturation of TCE. These preliminary sets of experiments have enabled selection of suitable tracers for the water-saturated experiments and have lead to improved experimental designs and methods.'
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Brusseau, M. L.; White, M.; Nelson, N. & Oostrom, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

STOMP Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases: User`s guide

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy, through the Office of Technology Development, has requested the demonstration of remediation technologies for the cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated radionuclides within the soil and groundwater at arid sites. This demonstration program, called the VOC-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration Program (Arid-ID), has been initially directed at a volume of unsaturated and saturated soil contaminated with carbon tetrachloride, on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. A principal subtask of the Arid-ID program involves the development of an integrated engineering simulator for evaluating the effectiveness and efficiency of various remediation technologies. The engineering simulator`s intended users include scientists and engineers who are investigating soil physics phenomena associated with remediation technologies. Principal design goals for the engineer simulator include broad applicability, verified algorithms, quality assurance controls, and validated simulations against laboratory and field-scale experiments. An important goal for the simulator development subtask involves the ability to scale laboratory and field-scale experiments to full-scale remediation technologies, and to transfer acquired technology to other arid sites. The STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator has been developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for modeling remediation technologies. Information on the use, application, and theoretical basis of the STOMP simulator theory and discussions on the governing equations, constitutive relations, and numerical solution algorithms for the STOMP simulator.
Date: October 1, 1997
Creator: White, M.D. & Oostrom, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

STOMP Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases: Application guide

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through the Office of Technology Development, has requested the demonstration of remediation technologies for the cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated radionuclides within the soil and ground water at arid sites. This demonstration program, called the VOC-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstrated Program (Arid-ID), has been initially directed at a volume of unsaturated and saturated soil contaminated with carbon tetrachloride on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. A principal subtask of the Arid-ID program involves the development of an integrated engineering simulator for evaluating the effectiveness and efficiency of various remediation technologies. The engineering simulator`s intended users include scientists and engineers who are investigating soil physics phenomena associated with remediation technologies. Principal design goals for the engineering simulator include broad applicability, verified algorithms, quality assurance controls, and validated simulations against laboratory and field-scale experiments. An important goal for the simulator development subtask involves the ability to scale laboratory and field-scale experiments to full-scale remediation technologies, and to transfer acquired technology to other arid sites. The STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for modeling remediation technologies. Information on the use, application, and theoretical basis of the STOMP simulator are documented in three companion guide guides. This document, the Application Guide, provides a suite of example applications of the STOMP simulator.
Date: September 1997
Creator: Nichols, W. E.; Aimo, N. J.; Oostrom, M. & White, M. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department