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Burma-U.S. Relations

Description: This report provides an overview of United States policy towards Burma. The report discusses Burma - U.S. relations and the political situation in Burma.
Date: January 22, 2007
Creator: Niksch, Larry A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

North Korea: Terrorism List Removal

Description: The issue of North Korea's inclusion on the U.S. list of terrorism-supporting countries has been a major issue in U.S.-North Korean diplomacy since 2000, particularly in connection with negotiations over North Korea's nuclear program. North Korea demanded that the Clinton and Bush Administration remove North Korea from the terrorism support list. Secretary of State Clinton said on June 7, 2009, that the Obama Administration would consider reinstating North Korea on the list of state supporters of terrorism. However, she said that there would have to be "recent evidence of their support for international terrorism."
Date: July 1, 2009
Creator: Niksch, Larry A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

North Korea's Nuclear Weapons Program

Description: North Korea's decisions and policies regarding nuclear weapons create a foreign policy problem for the United States. The main objective of the Bush Administration is to secure the dismantling of North Korea's plutonium and uranium-based nuclear programs. Critics of the Bush Administration have charged that despite its tough rhetoric, the Administration gives North Korea a relatively low priority in U.S. foreign policy and takes a passive diplomatic approach to the nuclear issue and other issues. This report outlines the Administration's strategy in regards to this. It also describes international reactions and responses to this strategy and to the U.S.-North Korean relations in general.
Date: August 1, 2006
Creator: Niksch, Larry A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Korea: U.S.-Korean Relations -- Issues for Congress

Description: This report outlines the various elements of the bilateral relations between both the U.S. and North Korea and the U.S. and South Korea, especially nuclear nonproliferation agreements, nuclear dismantlement policies, and U.S. military troop withdrawals from South Korea.
Date: July 21, 2006
Creator: Niksch, Larry A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Korea: U.S.-Korean Relations -- Issues for Congress

Description: North Korea's decision in December 2002 to restart nuclear installations at Yongbyon that were shut down under the U.S.-North Korean Agreed Framework of 1994 and its announced withdrawal from the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty create an acute foreign policy problem for the United States. The Bush Administration maintains that North Korea must do certain things, such as the dismantling of both its plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) programs, as well as the institution of financial sanctions at foreign banks and companies that cooperate with North Korea in international illegal activities. Differences have emerged between the Bush Administration and South Korea over policies toward North Korea; South Korea has become critical of the Bush Administration's policies and the U.S. military presence. South Korea emphasizes bilateral reconciliation with North Korea, anti-U.S. demonstrations erupted in 2002, and Roh Moo-hyun was elected President after criticizing the United States.
Date: June 7, 2006
Creator: Niksch, Larry A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Norht Korea's Nuclear Weapons Program

Description: North Korea's decisions to restart nuclear installations at Yongbyon that were shut down under the U.S.-South Korean Agreed Framework of 1994 and to withdraw from the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty create an acute foreign policy problem for the United States. Restarting the Yongbyon facilities opens up a possible North Korean intent to stage a "nuclear breakout" of its nuclear program and openly produce nuclear weapons. The main objective of the Bush Administration is to secure the dismantling of North Korea's plutonium and uranium-based nuclear programs. China, South Korea, and Russia have criticized the Bush Administration for not negotiating directly with North Korea, and they voice opposition to economic sanctions and to the use force against Pyongyang. China, Russia, and even South Korea increasingly have expressed support for North Korea's position in six-party talks facilitated by China, but the talks have made little progress.
Date: May 25, 2006
Creator: Niksch, Larry A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department