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Flutter Tests of a 1/25-Scale Model of the B-36J/RF-84F Tip-Coupled Airplane Configuration in the Langley 19-Foot Pressure Tunnel

Description: Report discussing tests of a model of a B-36J/RF-84F tip-coupled airplane to evaluate the flutter characteristics where bomber-body freedoms are allowed and to obtain information about the dynamic stability characteristics. The variables studied were the skew angle of the fighter-bomber coupling, the fighter longitudinal position, the fighter and bomber loading, angle of sideslip, degrees of body freedom, and number of fighters. Flutter was primarily found to occur when the fighter roll frequency was near the natural chordwise-bending frequency of the bomber wing.
Date: January 11, 1956
Creator: Neely, Robert H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Low-speed characteristics in pitch of a 42 degree sweptback wing with aspect ratio 3.9 and circular-arc airfoil sections

Description: Report presenting tests in a pressure tunnel to determine the low-speed pitch characteristics of a 42 degree sweptback wing with circular-arc airfoil sections. Information regarding the characteristics of basic wing, leading-edge flap investigation, and effects of fuselage are provided.
Date: November 13, 1947
Creator: Neely, Robert H. & Koven, William
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aerodynamic characteristics of a 42 degree swept-back wing with aspect ratio 4 and NACA 64(sub 1)-112 airfoil sections at Reynolds numbers from 1,700,000 to 9,500,000

Description: Report discussing testing on a 42 degree swept-back wing to determine its low-speed aerodynamic characteristics in pitch and yaw at high Reynolds numbers. The main effect of increasing the Reynolds number was delayed wing stalling to higher angles of attack. Roughness on the wing leading edge also had a large adverse effect on lift, drag, and pitching-moment characteristics at higher Reynolds numbers.
Date: May 23, 1947
Creator: Neely, Robert H. & Conner, D. William
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wind-tunnel investigation of an NACA low-drag tapered wing with straight trailing edge and simple split flaps, special report

Description: Report discusses the results of an investigation to determine the effect of the split flaps on the aerodynamic characteristics of the tapered wing. The results indicated that values of maximum lift coefficient obtained from the NACA low-drag sections are comparable to values obtained on tapered wings with conventional sections. The addition of split flaps did not appreciably alter the pattern of the stall.
Date: December 1941
Creator: Muse, Thomas C. & Neely, Robert H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an NACA 66,2-216 Low-Drag Wing with Split Flaps of Various Sizes, Special Report

Description: An investigation was conducted in the NACA 19-foot pressure wind tunnel of a rectangular wing having NACA 66, 2-216 low-drag airfoil sections and various sizes of simple split flaps. The purpose of the investigation was, primarily, to determine the influence of these flap installations on the aerodynamic characteristics of the wing. Complete lift, drag, and pitching-moment characteristics were determined for a range of test Reynolds numbers from about 2,600,000 to 4,600,000 for each of the installations and for the plain wing. The results of this investigation indicate that values of maximum lift coefficient similar to those of wings with conventional airfoil sections and split flaps can be expected of wings having the NACA 66,2-216 low-drag sections. The increment of maximum lift due to the split flap was found to be practically independent of the Reynolds number over the range investigated. The optimum split flap on the basis of maximum lift appears to have a chord about 20% of the wing chord and a deflection of 60 degrees. The C(sub L) max of the wing with the 0.20c partial-span flap deflected 60 degrees is 2.07 at a Reynolds number of 4,600,000 while with the full-span flap it is approximately 2.53; the increment of the maximum lift coefficient due to the flap is approximately proportional to the flap span. Although the addition of a split flap tends to hasten the stall and to cause it to occur more abruptly, little change in pattern is evidenced by observations of the behavior of wool tufts on the wing.
Date: September 1941
Creator: Muse, Thomas C. & Neely, Robert H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary and analysis of horizontal-tail contribution to longitudinal stability of swept-wing airplanes at low speeds

Description: Report discussing available wind-tunnel data on low-speed horizontal-tail contribution to the static longitudinal stability of high-speed airplane configurations with unswept and sweptback wings. The effects of variations of tail position, wing plan form, airfoil section, trailing-edge flaps, stall-control devices, and ground interference on air-flow characteristics an tail contribution are also described.
Date: August 23, 1955
Creator: Neely, Robert H. & Griner, Roland F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of a fuselage and various high-lift and stall-control flaps on aerodynamic characteristics in pitch of an NACA 64-series 40 degree swept-back wing

Description: Report presenting wind-tunnel testing to determine the low-speed lift, drag, and pitching-moment characteristics of a 40 degree sweptback wing with high-lift and stall-control flaps and a fuselage with a fineness ratio of 10.2 to 1. Low, medium, and high-wing-fuselage combinations were tested at high Reynolds numbers. Results regarding the high-lift and stall-control flaps and wing-fuselage combinations are provided.
Date: May 26, 1947
Creator: Conner, D. William & Neely, Robert H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Method for calculating wing characteristics by lifting-line theory using nonlinear section lift data

Description: Report presenting a method for calculating wing characteristics by lifting-line theory using nonlinear section lift data. The wing characteristics calculated from general nonlinear section lift data have been found to agree much closer with experimental data in the region of maximum lift coefficient than those calculated on the assumption of linear section lift curves.
Date: April 1947
Creator: Sivells, James C. & Neely, Robert H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Method for calculating wing characteristics by lifting-line theory using nonlinear section lift data

Description: "A method is presented for calculating wing characteristics by lifting-line theory using nonlinear section lift data. Material from various sources is combined with some original work into the single complete method described. Multhopp's systems of multipliers are employed to obtain the induced angle of attack directly from the spanwise lift distribution. Equations are developed for obtaining these multipliers for any even number of spanwise stations, and values are tabulated for 10 stations along the semispan for asymmetrical, symmetrical, and antisymmetrical lift distributions" (p. 1).
Date: December 20, 1946
Creator: Sivells, James C. & Neely, Robert H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experimental and calculated characteristics of several NACA 44-series wings with aspect ratios of 8, 10, and 12 and taper ratios of 2.5 and 3.5

Description: The aerodynamic characteristics of seven unswept tapered wings were determined by calculation from two-dimensional data and by wind-tunnel tests in order to demonstrate the accuracy of the calculations and to show some of the effects of aspect ratio, taper ratio, and root thickness-chord ratio. The characteristics were calculated by the usual application of the lifting-line theory which assumes linear section lift curves and also by an application of the theory which allows the use of nonlinear lift curves. A correction to the lift for the effect of chord was made by using the Jones edge-velocity factor. The wings had aspect ratios of 8, 10, and 12, taper ratios of 2.5 and 3.5, and NACA 44-series airfoils.
Date: May 1947
Creator: Neely, Robert H.; Bollech, Thomas V.; Westrick, Gertrude C. & Graham, Robert R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of wing and nacelle modifications on drag and wake characteristics of a bomber-type airplane model

Description: Report presenting an investigation of a model of a large four-engine bomber to determine the effects of several wing and nacelle modifications on drag characteristics and airflow characteristics at the tail. Leading-edge gloves, trailing-edge extensions, and modified nacelle afterbodies were all tested. Results regarding flow characteristics at the wing during flight and at the landing condition, flow characteristics at the tail, and longitudinal stability characteristics are provided.
Date: December 1945
Creator: Neely, Robert H.; Fairbanks, Richard W. & Conner, D. William
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flutter Tests of a 1/25-Scale Model of the B-36J/RF-84F Tip-Coupled Airplane Configuration in the Langley 19-Foot Pressure Tunnel

Description: Memorandum presenting tests of a scale model of a B-36J/RF-84F tip-coupled airplane in the 19-foot pressure tunnel in order to evaluate the flutter characteristics where bomber-body freedoms are allowed and to obtain an indication of the dynamic stability characteristics of the configuration. The variables studied in the investigation included skew angle of the fighter-bomber coupling, fighter longitudinal position, fighter and bomber loading, angle of sideslip, degrees of body freedom, and the number of fighters.
Date: March 15, 1956
Creator: Neely, Robert H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department