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Permeability of shale at elevated temperature and pressure: Test methodology and preliminary results

Description: A method of measuring the hydraulic conductivity of low permeability shale as a function of pressure and temperature has been developed and successfully demonstrated. Measurements have been performed on samples of Green River Formation up to a temperature of 140/sup 0/C. For flow parallel to bedding hydraulic conductivities increased nonlinearly from 1.75 x 10/sup -16/ m/s (1.6 x 10/sup -23/ m/sup 2/) at 25/sup 0/C, to 5.6 x 10/sup -15/ m/s (1.4 x 10/sup -22/ m/sup 2/) at 140/sup 0/C. This increase in permeability with temperature may reflect an increase in microcrack porosity resulting from the heating.
Date: May 1, 1987
Creator: Myer, L.R. & Christian, T.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Two-phase flow visualization and relative permeability measurement in transparent replicas of rough-walled rock fractures

Description: Understanding and quantifying multi-phase flow in fractures is important for mathematical and numerical simulation of geothermal reservoirs, nuclear waste repositories, and petroleum reservoirs. While the cubic law for single-phase flow has been well established for parallel-plate fractures theoretically and experimentally, no reliable measurements of multi-phase flow in fractures have been reported. This work reports the design and fabrication of an apparatus for visualization of two-phase flow and for measurement of gas-liquid relative permeability in realistic rough-walled rock fractures. A transparent replica of a natural rock fracture from a core specimen is fabricated by molding and casting in clear epoxy. Simultaneous flow of gas and liquid with control of capillary pressure at inlet and outlet is achieved with the Hassler ''sandwich'' design: liquid is injected to the fracture through a porous block, while gas is injected directly to the edge of the fracture through channels in the porous block. A similar arrangement maintains capillary separation of the two phases at the outlet. Pressure drops in each phase across the fracture, and capillary pressures at the inlet and outlet, are controlled by means of pumps and needle valves, and are measured by differential and absolute pressure transducers. The clear epoxy cast of the natural fracture preserves the geometry of the fracture and permits visual observation of phase distributions. The fracture aperture distribution can be estimated by filling the fracture with a dyed liquid, and making pointwise measurements of the intensity of transmitted light. A set of two-phase flow experiments has been performed which has proven the viability of the basic experimental design, while also suggesting further improvements in the apparatus. Preliminary measurements are presented for single-phase permeability to liquid, and for relative permeabilities in simultaneous flow of liquid and gas.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Persoff, P.; Pruess, K. & Myer, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coupled reservoir-geomechanical analysis of CO2 injection and ground deformations at In Salah, Algeria

Description: In Salah Gas Project in Algeria has been injecting 0.5-1 million tonnes CO{sub 2} per year over the past five years into a water-filled strata at a depth of about 1,800 to 1,900 m. Unlike most CO{sub 2} storage sites, the permeability of the storage formation is relatively low and comparatively thin with a thickness of about 20 m. To ensure adequate CO{sub 2} flow-rates across the low-permeability sand-face, the In Salah Gas Project decided to use long-reach (about 1 to 1.5 km) horizontal injection wells. In an ongoing research project we use field data and coupled reservoir-geomechanical numerical modeling to assess the effectiveness of this approach and to investigate monitoring techniques to evaluate the performance of a CO{sub 2}-injection operation in relatively low permeability formations. Among the field data used are ground surface deformations evaluated from recently acquired satellite-based inferrometry (InSAR). The InSAR data shows a surface uplift on the order of 5 mm per year above active CO{sub 2} injection wells and the uplift pattern extends several km from the injection wells. In this paper we use the observed surface uplift to constrain our coupled reservoir-geomechanical model and conduct sensitivity studies to investigate potential causes and mechanisms of the observed uplift. The results of our analysis indicates that most of the observed uplift magnitude can be explained by pressure-induced, poro-elastic expansion of the 20 m thick injection zone, but there could also be a significant contribution from pressure-induced deformations within a 100 m thick zone of shaly sands immediately above the injection zone.
Date: November 1, 2009
Creator: Rutqvist, J.; Vasco, D.W. & Myer, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fracture permeability and seismic wave scattering--Poroelastic linear-slip interface model for heterogeneous fractures

Description: Schoenberg's Linear-slip Interface (LSI) model for single, compliant, viscoelastic fractures has been extended to poroelastic fractures for predicting seismic wave scattering. However, this extended model results in no impact of the in-plane fracture permeability on the scattering. Recently, we proposed a variant of the LSI model considering the heterogeneity in the in-plane fracture properties. This modified model considers wave-induced, fracture-parallel fluid flow induced by passing seismic waves. The research discussed in this paper applies this new LSI model to heterogeneous fractures to examine when and how the permeability of a fracture is reflected in the scattering of seismic waves. From numerical simulations, we conclude that the heterogeneity in the fracture properties is essential for the scattering of seismic waves to be sensitive to the permeability of a fracture.
Date: June 15, 2009
Creator: Nakagawa, S. & Myer, L.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Drill-back studies examine fractured, heated rock

Description: To investigate the effects of heating on the mineralogical, geochemical, and mechanical properties of rock by high-level radioactive waste, cores are being examined from holes penetrating locations where electric heaters simulated the presence of a waste canister, and from holes penetration natural hydrothermal systems. Results to date indicate the localized mobility and deposition of uranium in an open fracture in heated granitic rock, the mobility of U in a breccia zone in an active hydrothermal system in tuff, and the presence of U in relatively high concentration in fracture-lining material in tuff. Mechanical -- property studies indicate that differences in compressional- and shear-wave parameters between heated and less heated rock can be attributed to differences in the density of microcracks. Emphasis has shifted from initial studies of granitic rock at Stripa, Sweden to current investigations of welded tuff at the Nevada Test Site. 7 refs., 8 figs.
Date: January 1, 1990
Creator: Wollenberg, H.A.; Flexser, S. & Myer, L.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Two-phase flow visualization and relative permeability measurement in transparent replicas of rough-walled rock fractures

Description: Understanding and quantifying multi-phase flow in fractures is important for mathematical and numerical simulation of geothermal reservoirs, nuclear waste repositories, and petroleum reservoirs. While the cubic law for single-phase flow has been well established for parallel-plate fractures theoretically and experimentally, no reliable measurements of multi-phase flow in fractures have been reported. This work reports the design and fabrication of an apparatus for visualization of two-phase flow and for measurement of gas-liquid relative permeability in realistic rough-walled rock fractures. A transparent replica of a natural rock fracture from a core specimen is fabricated by molding and casting in clear epoxy. Simultaneous flow of gas and liquid with control of capillary pressure at inlet and outlet is achieved with the Hassler sandwich'' design: liquid is injected to the fracture through a porous block, while gas is injected directly to the edge of the fracture through channels in the porous block. A similar arrangement maintains capillary separation of the two phases at the outlet. Pressure drops in each phase across the fracture, and capillary pressures at the inlet and outlet, are controlled by means of pumps and needle valves, and are measured by differential and absolute pressure transducers. The clear epoxy cast of the natural fracture preserves the geometry of the fracture and permits visual observation of phase distributions. The fracture aperture distribution can be estimated by filling the fracture with a dyed liquid, and making pointwise measurements of the intensity of transmitted light.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Persoff, P.; Pruess, K. & Myer, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Detailed report on tested models companion report 2 to simulation of geothermal subsidence (LBL 10571)

Description: An assessment was performed of existing mathematical models for subsidence simulation and prediction. Detailed analyses are presented of the theory, power, usability, and performance of the seven models used in conjunction with an ongoing research program aimed at improved understanding and control of ground movements caused by geothermal power production. The models used were: hand-calculation techniques; the nucleus-of-strain method; the one-dimensional Terzaghi consolidation method; the two-dimensional boundary-integral-equation method; two-dimensional finite-element coupled fluid flow and deformation; three-dimensional integrated finite difference, coupled fluid flow, heat flow, and porosity change; and the three-dimensional displacement discontinuity method. (MHR)
Date: March 1, 1980
Creator: Miller, I.; Dershowitz, W.; Jones, K.; Myer, L.; Roman, K. & Schauer, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simulation of geothermal subsidence

Description: The results of an assessment of existing mathematical models for subsidence simulation and prediction are summarized. The following subjects are discussed: the prediction process, physical processes of geothermal subsidence, computational models for reservoir flow, computational models for deformation, proficiency assessment, and real and idealized case studies. (MHR)
Date: March 1, 1980
Creator: Miller, I.; Dershowitz, W.; Jones, K.; Myer, L.; Roman, K. & Schauer, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Case study data base companion report 3 to simulation of geothermal subsidence (LBL-10571)

Description: The data base developed for selection and evaluation of geothermal subsidence case studies is presented. Data from this data base were used in case studies of Wairakei, The Geysers, and Austin Bayou Prospect (Report LBL 10571).
Date: March 1, 1980
Creator: Miller, I.; Dershowitz, W.; Jones, K.; Myer, L.; Roman, K. & Schauer, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nonlinear interaction of plane elastic waves

Description: The paper presents basic first order results of nonlinear elastic theory by Murnaghan for elastic wave propagation in isotropic solids. The authors especially address the problem of resonant scattering of two collimated beams and present analytical solutions for amplitudes of all possible types of resonant interactions for elastic plane waves. For estimation of nonlinear scattered waves they use measured elastic parameters for sandstone. The most profound nonlinear effect is expected for interactions of two SH waves generating compressional P wave at sum frequency. Estimations show that nonlinear phenomena is likely to be observed in seismic data. Basic equations of nonlinear five-constant theory by Murnaghan are also presented.
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Korneev, V.A.; Nihei, K.T. & Myer, L.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A stratified percolation model for saturated and unsaturated flow through natural fractures

Description: The geometry of the asperities of contact between the two surfaces of a fracture and of the adjacent void spaces determines fluid flow through a fracture and the mechanical deformation across a fracture. Heuristically we have developed a stratified continuum percolation model to describe this geometry based on a fractal construction that includes scale invariance and correlation of void apertures. Deformation under stress is analyzed using conservation of rock volume to correct for asperity interpenetration. Single phase flow is analyzed using a critical path along which the principal resistance is a result of laminar flow across the critical neck in this path. Results show that flow decreases with apparent aperture raised to a variable power greater than cubic, as is observed in flow experiments on natural fractures. For two phases, flow of the non-wetting phase is likewise governed by the critical neck along the critical path of largest aperture but flow of the wetting phase is governed by tortuosity. 17 refs., 10 figs.
Date: January 1, 1990
Creator: Pyrak-Nolte, L.J.; Cook, N.G.W. & Myer, L.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rocks

Description: This paper presents the results of laboratory measurements on the mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rock. Artificial rock samples were fabricated by cementing sand and glass beads with sodium silicate binder. During uniaxial compression tests, the rock samples showed stress-strain behavior which was more similar to that of soils than competent rocks, exhibiting large permanent deformations with frictional slip. The mechanical behavior of the samples approached that of competent rocks as the amount of binder was increased. For very weak samples, acoustic waves propagating in these rocks showed very low velocities of less than 1000 m/sec for compressional waves. A borehole made within this weakly cemented rock exhibited a unique mode of failure that is called ''anti-KI mode fracture'' in this paper. The effect of cementation, grain type, and boundary conditions on this mode of failure was also examined experimentally.
Date: May 9, 2001
Creator: Nakagawa, S. & Myer, L.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Combined seismic and hydraulic method of modeling flow in fractured low permeability rocks

Description: Modeling flow of ground water in hard rocks where a network of fractures provides the dominant flow paths is a major problem. This paper summarizes a program of investigations currently underway in this laboratory to characterize the geometry of fractured rocks and develop methods of handling flow in such systems. Numerical models have been developed to investigate flow behavior in two- and three-dimensional fracture networks. The results demonstrate the insights that can be gained from modeling studies of fractured rocks. A key problem is gathering the necessary data on fracture geometry. Investigations have been started to determine how vertical seismic profiling (VSP) might be improved and applied to this problem. A VSP experiment in The Geysers geothermal field in northern California, where fracture orientation is known, produced shear wave splitting and velocity anisotropy in agreement with theory. The results suggest the potential application of 3-component, multi-source VSP data in determining fracture orientation and average spacing. We believe a combination of seismic and hydraulic methods can greatly enhance an understanding of fluid flow and transport in low permeability rock systems where fractures provide the dominant paths. 40 refs, 16 figs., 4 tabs.
Date: June 1, 1987
Creator: Witherspoon, P.A.; Long, J.C.S.; Majer, E.L. & Myer, L.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Physical processes of compaction companion report 1 to simulation of geothermal subsidence

Description: There are a variety of theories, techniques, and parameters in the subsidence literature. Biot's theory, Terzaghi's theory, and the theory of interacting continua (TINC) are used to explain solid-fluid interaction; stress-strain theories range from linear elastic to e-log p to plasticity and pore-collapse theories. Parameters are numerous: void ratio,, permeability, compaction coefficient, pore compressibility, Young's modulus, bulk modulus, shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, Lame coefficients, coefficient of consolidation, and storage coefficient. The physical processes which govern compaction and deformation in geothermal systems are reviewed. The review is an attempt to provide a reasonably coherent general structure for the theories and parameters which were referred to above. The materials presented is a compendium of existing published work.
Date: March 1, 1980
Creator: Miller, I.; Dershowitz, W.; Jones, K.; Myer, L.; Roman, K. & Schauer, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hydraulic and mechanical properties of natural fractures in low-permeability rock

Description: The results of a comprehensive laboratory study of the mechanical displacement, permeability, and void geometry of single rock fractures in a quartz monzonite are summarized and analyzed. A metal-injection technique was developed that provided quantitative data on the precise geometry of the void spaces between the fracture surfaces and the areas of contact at different stresses. At effective stresses of less than 20 MPa fluid flow was proportional to the mean fracture aperture raised to a power greater than 3. As stress was increased, contact area was increased and void spaces become interconnected by small tortuous channels that constitute the principal impediment to fluid flow. At effective stresses higher than 20 MPa, the mean fracture aperture continued to diminish with increasing stress, but this had little effect on flow because the small tortuous flow channels deformed little with increasing stress.
Date: January 1, 1987
Creator: Pyrack-Nolte, L.J.; Myer, L.R.; Cook, N.G.W. & Witherspoon, P.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Potential for Induced Seismicity Related to the Northern California CO2 Reduction Project Pilot Test, Solano County, California

Description: The objective of this technical report is to analyze the potential for induced seismicity due to a proposed small-scale CO{sub 2} injection project in the Montezuma Hills. We reviewed currently available public information, including 32 years of recorded seismic events, locations of mapped faults, and estimates of the stress state of the region. We also reviewed proprietary geological information acquired by Shell, including seismic reflection imaging in the area, and found that the data and interpretations used by Shell are appropriate and satisfactory for the purpose of this report. The closest known fault to the proposed injection site is the Kirby Hills Fault. It appears to be active, and microearthquakes as large as magnitude 3.7 have been associated with the fault near the site over the past 32 years. Most of these small events occurred 9-17 miles (15-28 km) below the surface, which is deep for this part of California. However, the geographic locations of the many events in the standard seismicity catalog for the area are subject to considerable uncertainty because of the lack of nearby seismic stations; so attributing the recorded earthquakes to motion along any specific fault is also uncertain. Nonetheless, the Kirby Hills Fault is the closest to the proposed injection site and is therefore our primary consideration for evaluating the potential seismic impacts, if any, from injection. Our planned installation of seismic monitoring stations near the site will greatly improve earthquake location accuracy. Shell seismic data also indicate two unnamed faults more than 3 miles east of the project site. These faults do not reach the surface as they are truncated by an unconformity at a depth of about 2,000 feet (610 m). The unconformity is identified as occurring during the Oligocene Epoch, 33.9-23.03 million years ago, which indicates that these faults are not currently ...
Date: June 15, 2010
Creator: Myer, L.; Chiaramonte, L.; Daley, T.M.; Wilson, D.; Foxall, W. & Beyer, J.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Acquisition of time-lapse, 6-component, P- and S-wave, crosswell seismic survey with orbital vibrator and of time-lapse VSP for CO2 injection monitoring

Description: Using an orbital vibrator source (2-components), and a 40 level 3-component geophone string, a 6-component crosswell survey was acquired before and after a CO2 injection in a saline aquifer. Decomposition of the two source components and component rotation of both source and sensors created good separation of P- and S-wave energy allowing independent analysis of travel time and reflectivity. A time-lapse VSP was also acquired.
Date: July 15, 2004
Creator: Daley, Tom; Daley, T. M.; Myer, L.R. & Majer, E.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A field test of permeation grouting in heterogeneous soils using a new generation of barrier liquids

Description: A field demonstration of permeation grouting was conducted at a gravel quarry near Los Banos, California, with the purpose of demonstrating the feasibility of the concept. Two grouts were used: a form of colloidal silica that gels after the addition of a gelling agent, and a polysiloxane that polymerizes after the addition of a catalyst. Both create relatively impermeable barriers in response to the large increase in viscosity during gelation or polymerization, respectively. The grouts were successfully injected at a depth between 10 and 14ft. Subsequent exhumation of the injected gravels revealed that both grouts produced relatively uniform bulbs. Laboratory measurements of the grouted material retrieved from the field showed at least a four order of magnitude reduction in permeability over the ungrouted material.
Date: August 1995
Creator: Moridis, G. J.; Persoff, P.; Apps, J. A.; Myer, L.; Pruess, K. & Yen, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

VSP [Vertical Seismic Profiling] and cross hole tomographic imaging for fracture characterization

Description: For the past several years LBL has been carrying out experiments at various fractured rock sites to determine the fundamental nature of the propagation of seismic waves in fractured media. These experiments have been utilizing high frequency (1000 to 10000 Hz.) signals in a cross-hole configuration at scales of several tens of meters. Three component sources and receivers are used to map fracture density, and orientation. The goal of the experiments has been to relate the seismological parameters to the hydrological parameters, if possible, in order to provide a more accurate description of a starting model for hydrological characterization. The work is ultimately aimed at the characterization and monitoring of the Yucca Mountain site for the storage of nuclear waste. In addition to these controlled experiments multicomponent VSP work has been carried out at several sites to determine fracture characteristics. The results to date indicate that both P-wave and S-wave can be used to map the location of fractures. In addition, fractures that are open and conductive are much more visible to seismic waves that non-conductive fractures. The results of these tests indicate direct use in an unsaturated environment. 12 refs., 10 figs.
Date: September 1, 1989
Creator: Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E.; Myer, L.R.; Karasaki, K.; Daley, T.M. & Long, J.C.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fracture imaging with converted elastic waves

Description: This paper examines the seismic signatures of discrete, finite-length fractures, and outlines an approach for elastic, prestack reverse-time imaging of discrete fractures. The results of this study highlight the importance of incorporating fracture-generated P-S converted waves into the imaging method, and presents an alternate imaging condition that can be used in elastic reverse-time imaging when a direct wave is recorded (e.g., for crosswell and VSP acquisition geometries).
Date: May 29, 2001
Creator: Nihei, K.T.; Nakagawa, S. & Myer, L.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Relative permeability and the microscopic distribution of wetting and nonwetting phases in the pore space of Berea sandstone

Description: Experiments to study relative permeabilities of a partially saturated rock have been carried out in Berea sandstone using fluids that can be solidified in place. The effective permeability of the spaces not occupied by the wetting fluid (paraffin wax) or the nonwetting fluid (Wood`s metal), have been measured at various saturations after solidifying each of the phases. The tests were conducted on Berea sandstone samples that had an absolute permeability of about 600 md. The shape of the laboratory-derived relative permeability vs. saturation curves measured with the other phase solidified conforms well with typical curves obtained using conventional experimental methods. The corresponding wetting and nonwetting fluid distributions at different saturations are presented and analyzed in light of the role of the pore structure in the invasion process, and their impact on relative permeability and capillary pressure. Irreducible wetting and nonwetting phase fluid distributions are studied. The effect of clay minerals on permeability is also assessed.
Date: April 1, 1994
Creator: Schlueter, E. M.; Cook, N. G. W.; Witherspoon, P. A. & Myer, L. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lance water injection tests adjacent to the 281-3H retention basin at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

Description: A pilot-scale field demonstration of waste isolation using viscous- liquid containment barriers has been planned for the 281-3H retention basin at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC. The 281-3H basin is a shallow retention/seepage basin contaminated mainly by radionuclides. The viscous-liquid containment barrier utilizes the permeation of liquid grout to either entomb the contaminants within a monolithic grout structure or to isolate the waste by drastically reducing the permeability, of the soils around the plume. A clear understanding of the hydrogeologic setting of the retention basin is necessary for proper design of the viscous liquid barrier. To aid in the understanding of the hydrogeology of the 281-3H retention basin, and to obtain critical parameters necessary for grout injection design, a series of tests were undertaken in a region immediately adjacent to the basin. The objectives of the LWIT were: 1. To evaluate the general performance of the Lance Injection Technique for grout emplacement at the site, including the range and upper limits of injection pressures, the flow rates applicable for site conditions, as well as the mechanical forces needed for lance penetration. 2. To obtain detailed information on the injectability of the soils immediately adjacent to the H-area retention basin. 3. To identify any high permeability zones suitable for injection and evaluate their spatial distribution. 4. To perform ground penetrating radar (GPR) to gain information on the structure of the soil column and to compare the results with LWIT data. This report will focus on results pertinent to these objectives.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Freifeld, B.; Myer, L.; Moridis, G.; Cook, P.; James, A.; Pellerin, L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A field test of a waste containment technology using a new generation of injectable barrier liquids

Description: A first stage field injection of a new generation of barrier liquids was successfully completed. Two types of barrier liquids, colloidal silica (CS) and polysiloxane (PSX), were injected into heterogeneous unsaturated deposits of sand, silt, and gravel typical of many of the arid DOE cleanup sites and particularly analogous to the conditions of the Hanford Site. Successful injection by commercially available chemical grouting equipment and the tube-a-manchette technique was demonstrated. Excavation of the grout bulbs permitted visual evaluation of the soil permeation by the grout, as well as sample collection. Both grouts effectively permeated all of the formation. The PSX visually appeared to perform better, producing a more uniform and symmetric permeation regardless of heterogeneity, filling large as well as small pores and providing more structural strength than the CS. Numerical simulation of the injection tests incorporated a stochastic field to represent site heterogeneity and was able to replicate the general test behavior. Tiltmeters were used successfully to monitor surface displacements during grout injection.
Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Moridis, G.; Apps, J.; Persoff, P.; Myer, L.; Muller, S.; Pruess, K. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department