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In-between Music: The Musical Creation of Cholo Identity in Cochabamba, Bolivia

Description: Music and identity are inextricably linked. While a particular social or ethnic group's music may reflect characteristics of that group, it also functions in creating the identity of the group. In Andean Bolivia, the choloethnic group has very subjective and constantly changing boundaries. Cholo-ness is made possible through mediated cultural performances of all types, in which members actively choose elements from both criollo and Indian cultures. Music is one particularly effective way in which cholos create and maintain their identity. This thesis focuses on the ways in which cholos use music to create a hybrid identity in and around Cochabamba, Bolivia.
Date: August 2007
Creator: Jones, Eric
Partner: UNT Libraries

Yoon-Seong Cho's Jazz Korea: A Cross-cultural Musical Excursion

Description: This thesis examines Yoon-Seong Cho's critically acclaimed recording Jazz Korea, in which Cho unites Korean folk music and American jazz into a single form of expression. By reinterpreting Korean folk music through jazz, Cho stimulated interest in the Korean jazz scene and a renewed interest in Korean traditional folk songs. The goal of the thesis, the first musicological essay about Yoon-Seong Cho, is to understand how Cho's diasporic experiences affected his music by leading to a process of self-discovery that allowed Cho to interpret his own identity. Through musical analysis, the study proposes a cultural interpretation of two of Cho's pieces that have achieved popularity not only among Koreans but also internationally: "Arirang" and Han-O-Baek-Nyun.
Date: May 2008
Creator: Joo, Hwajoon
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Model of Collaborative Creativity: The Arrangements of Nelson Riddle for Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald

Description: This dissertation explores the themes of collaboration and creativity in the relationship between arranger Nelson Riddle and vocalists Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald. It examines the balance between structure and freedom as well as the specific musical results that emerge from collaboration between an arranger and vocalists who are considered among the greatest in their fields. An examination of their interactions, musical scores, and performances, reveals that the constraints that are present in a collaborative effort can lead the artists to find a shared process to make a creative, unified product.
Date: May 2016
Creator: Evens, Gabriel I.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Woody Shaw: Development of Style in Three Versions of "The Moontrane”

Description: Woody Shaw is one of the most influential jazz trumpet players of the past fifty years. Despite his importance, very few models exist that contextualize Shaw's improvisatory approach inside modern jazz pedagogy. Writers such as Rex Richardson, Eric O'Donnell, and Gavin Franklin have identified key elements of Shaw's style, and have begun a critical examination of Shaw's music. While extensive, these approaches do not take into consideration the impact free jazz had on Shaw's technique, nor do they provide a model for how to duplicate Shaw's style. This project examines four elements of Shaw's style as seen in three improvised solos on "The Moontrane." These solos are taken from early, middle, and late stages of Shaw's career. By studying scale choice, sequence and the sequential treatment of motifs, pentatonic approaches to harmonic sequence, and atypical rhythmic phrasing, this study is able to show (1) how these elements developed over the totality of Shaw's career, (2) provide a better understanding of Shaw's improvisational style, and (3) provide a basis for implementing these procedures in modern music.
Date: May 2016
Creator: Karns, Keith Thomas
Partner: UNT Libraries

Collaborative Crossover: Identifying Classical Vocal Collaborative Piano Practices in Jazz Vocal Accompanying

Description: Classical vocal collaborative piano and jazz vocal accompaniment are well-established fields with long-standing performance traditions. Classical collaborative performance practices have been researched and codified, but jazz accompanying practices largely remain in the domain of aural tradition. Both classical and jazz accompaniment share associated practices, such as rubato, transposition, and attention to lyric diction and inflection, but there is little previous investigation into the idea that classical collaborative practices might apply to jazz accompanying. This research examines jazz piano accompanying practices in sung verses of standard tunes to demonstrate how accomplished jazz pianists intuitively use many of the same techniques as classical collaborative pianists to create balance with singers. Through application of expressive microtiming analysis to graphical displays of transcribed recorded performances, a strong correlation is established between the classical and jazz vocal accompanying traditions. Linking classical practices to jazz potentially creates a foundation for jazz accompanying pedagogy.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Morgenroth, David Jonathan
Partner: UNT Libraries

It's Not Fusion: Hybridity in the Music of Vijay Iyer and Rudresh Mahanthappa

Description: This thesis concerns the performance of identity in the music of Indian American jazz musicians Rudresh Mahanthappa and Vijay Iyer. In combining the use of Indian classical music elements with jazz, Iyer and Mahanthappa create music that is inextricably tied to their multifaceted identities. Traditional musicological analysis is juxtaposed with a theoretical framework that draws on postcolonial theory and the history of Asian immigrant populations to the U.S. I chronicle the interactions between Indian and Western music and link it to larger issues of Asian American identity formation and activism through music. Through interviews and transcriptions of studio recordings, I identify specific compositional and improvisational strategies of the musicians. I emphasize the role of individual agency in the formation of second-generation identities, drawing attention to the distinct ways that Iyer and Mahanthappa approach their music. Finally, I connect this research to a larger discourse on Indian American artistic identity.
Date: December 2012
Creator: Govind, Arathi
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Evolution of Ella Fitzgerald's Syllabic Choices in Scat Singing: A Critical Analysis of Her Decca Recordings, 1943-1952

Description: This study examines the evolution of Ella Fitzgerald's scat syllable vocabulary during a key developmental period in her career when she was recording for Decca Records. Between 1943 and 1952, Fitzgerald established the syllabic vocabulary that would serve as a defining characteristic of her improvisational style for the rest of her career. Fitzgerald is commonly praised as the greatest vocal improviser in jazz history, but while much has been written about Fitzgerald's melodic and harmonic approach to jazz improvisation, little has been written about her syllabic approach. Timbre and articulation are considered to be vital elements of any jazz musician's style; the study examines the changes in Ella Fitzgerald's syllabic approach through transcription and analyses of thirteen scat solos recorded during this time period, using scat syllable choices to discuss timbre and articulation. This analysis provides a model for further research of its kind, as well as informing historically accurate performance practice by both teachers and students of jazz singing.
Date: May 2017
Creator: Binek, Justin Garrett
Partner: UNT Libraries

Programmatic Geographical Depictions in Large-Scale Jazz Ensemble Works: Major Works by Gil Evans and Chuck Owen and a New Work by Aaron Hedenstrom

Description: This dissertation explores the creative process in large-scale jazz ensemble works that are programmatic in depicting geographical locations. This is achieved through analyses of Gil Evans's Sketches of Spain, Chuck Owen's River Runs: A Concerto for Jazz Guitar, Saxophone, & Orchestra, and Aaron Hedenstrom's Sketches of Minnesota. Each work is examined using five analytical categories: orchestration, large-scale form, harmonic/melodic development, programmatic framework, and use of featured soloists. The analyses draw from musical scores, interviews, biographies, recordings, and articles to reveal more about each composer's artistic intentions. This study contributes to the broader knowledge of large-ensemble jazz works and programmatic jazz works. This research meets the need for more critical analyses of important jazz ensemble works relevant to composers, arrangers, and scholars.
Date: May 2016
Creator: Hedenstrom, Aaron Norell
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Evolution of the Improvisational Vocabulary of Marc Johnson

Description: This study examines the evolution of the improvisational vocabulary utilized by bassist Marc Johnson over the course of his career. Through interviews and musical analysis the study contextualizes Johnson’s musical influences, considers how they shaped his development, and examines his role in the legacy of the stylistic lineage established by Scott LaFaro with the Bill Evans Trio. A survey of literature concerning Johnson, Scott LaFaro and Eddie Gomez is included, as well as a discussion of the impact of apprenticeship on Johnson’s career. The study illuminates aspects of Johnson’s current vocabulary and how he has synthesized influences to create a distinctive vocabulary, not derivative of Scott LaFaro or Eddie Gomez, but incorporating elements of their style in the composition of his own voice.
Date: May 2016
Creator: Helsley, Jack Denard
Partner: UNT Libraries

Finding the "Indian" in Amy Beach's Theme and Variations for Flute and String Quartet, op. 80.

Description: Music that is categorized as part of the Indianist movement in American music (ca. 1890-1925) typically evokes Native American culture, ritual, story, or song through compositional gestures. It may also incorporate Native American tunes. Amy Beach (1867-1944) is considered to have composed five Indianist works, but her Theme and Variations for Flute and String Quartet, op. 80 has not been included as one of them. This thesis rethinks categorization of the piece, seeking the "Indian" in it through examination of its gestures, instrumentation, and relationship to contemporary Indianist compositions.
Date: December 2007
Creator: Burgess, Stephanie J.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Otha Turner Family Picnic: Occupying Musical and Social Space In-Between Saturday Night and Sunday Morning

Description: This thesis concerns African-American fife and drum band music, a pre-blues genre that was a fixture at summer picnics in the Mississippi hill country from the late nineteenth century through most of the twentieth century. The picnics held a unique place in African-American life, a crossroads of juke joints and churches, blues and gospel, individuality and family. Using the African-American paradigm of a Saturday night / Sunday morning people, I describe the Otha Turner Family Picnic, the last picnic to feature fife and drum band music, locating it and the music in-between the secular and sacred aspects of African-American life from both a musical and a social standpoint.
Date: May 2011
Creator: Vermilyea, Carl P.
Partner: UNT Libraries

"Being" a Stickist: A Phenomenological Consideration of "Dwelling" in a Virtual Music Scene

Description: Musical instruments are not static, unchanging objects. They are, instead, things that materially evolve in symmetry with human practices. Alterations to an instrument's design often attend to its ergonomic or expressive capacity, but sometimes an innovator causes an entirely new instrument to arise. One such instrument is the Chapman Stick. This instrument's history is closely intertwined with global currents that have evolved into virtual, online scenes. Virtuality obfuscates embodiment, but the Stick's world, like any instrument's, is optimally related in intercorporeal exchanges. Stickists circumvent real and virtual obstacles to engage the Stick world. Using an organology informed by the work of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty, this study examines how the Chapman Stick, as a material "thing," speaks in and through a virtual, representational environment.
Date: May 2010
Creator: Hodges, Jeff
Partner: UNT Libraries

Cyclic Patterns in John Coltrane's Melodic Vocabulary as Influenced by Nicolas Slonimsky's Thesaurus of Scales and Melodic Patterns: An Analysis of Selected Improvisations

Description: This study documents and analyzes cyclic patterns used as melodic vocabulary in John Coltrane's improvisations from compositions of 1965 to 1967. The analysis is categorized in two distinct sections. The first section analyzes melodic vocabulary that is derived from the cycle of descending major thirds progressions found in the compositions of 1959 to 1960. The second section analyzes melodic vocabulary that is derived from Nicolas Slonimsky's Thesaurus of Scales and Melodic Patterns using the theoretical terminology incorporated in the treatise. Musical examples consist of patterns from the Thesaurus and excerpts from selected improvisations of John Coltrane as transcribed by Andrew White. Important scholarly contributions relevant to the subject by Carl Woideck, Lewis Porter, David Demsey, and Walt Weiskopf are included. Every effort has been made to cite interviews with musicians and commentaries by writers contemporary to that period of time with special emphasis on the important influence of Thelonious Monk, Miles Davis, and Ornette Coleman. Chapter headings include: Literature Review and Methodology; Thelonious Monk, Miles Davis, and Ornette Coleman: Converging Influences; Analysis: Coltrane's Major Thirds Harmonic Cycles Used as Melodic Vocabulary; Interval Cycles in Coltrane's Melodic Vocabulary Based on Patterns from Slonimsky's Thesaurus; Summary and Conclusion.
Date: August 2003
Creator: Bair, Jeff
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Examination of Laude: Four Character Sketches for Solo Trumpet in B-flat or C by Stanley Friedman, together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by Joseph Haydn, George Fredrick Handel, Eric Ewazen, and Others

Description: Stanley Friedman is a composer of many works, primarily for brass instruments, that have become part of the standard repertoire. Solus, for Trumpet Unaccompanied, for example, appears on many audition and competition lists, as do others of his works. On the other hand, Laude: Four Character Sketches for Solo Trumpet, commissioned by the International Trumpet Guild in 1980, is unfortunately not widely known among trumpet performers and educators. The intent of this study is to demonstrate, through discussion and analysis, the qualities and potential appeal of this lesser-known work and to renew interest in its performance. Among the six chapters is an overview of Laude, including an explanation of Friedman's peculiar titles for each movement: Nocturne for St. Thomas, Phantasie für Der Wiz, Berceuse for John Julius, and Rondo for Professor Nabob. Other chapters discuss the procedure for analysis of the work and probable sources for melodic material. The motivic development and form of each movement of the work are also explored. The final chapter includes recommendations for the performance of Laude and is followed by a summary and conclusion.
Date: August 2007
Creator: Lambert, Adam
Partner: UNT Libraries

Miles Davis: The Road to Modal Jazz

Description: The fact that Davis changed his mind radically several times throughout his life appeals to the curiosity. This thesis considers what could be one of the most important and definitive changes: the change from hard bop to modal jazz. This shift, although gradual, is best represented by and culminates in Kind of Blue, the first Davis album based on modal style, marking a clear break from hard bop. This thesis explores the motivations and reasons behind the change, and attempt to explain why it came about. The purpose of the study is to discover the reasons for the change itself as well as the reasons for the direction of the change: Why change and why modal music?
Date: May 2007
Creator: Camacho Bernal, Leonardo
Partner: UNT Libraries

Pillbox Hat

Description: Pillbox hat of yellow plastic/vinyl tubing. Top of crown formed of a coil of the tubing bent into a square or diamond shape, encircled by more coiled tubing forming a circle, leaving open areas. The sides of the crown have other open areas, and form slight scallops at lower edge. Extending through the tubing from upper edge of crown is black net veiling, with small pieces of the yellow tubing worked into some of the intersections of the veiling. Interior of crown lined with yellow mesh, cut away at openings, and edged with a thin strip of beige/yellow velvet. Two small plastic combs are attached at either side to secure hat to wearer's head. Designer's Label inside crown: "Bes-Ben / Made in Chicago"; a second hand-written label sewn in: "510" Gift of Mr. John C. Murphy, through the Chicago Historical Society.
Date: 1955
Creator: Green-Field, Benjamin B.
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Pillbox Hat

Description: Pillbox hat of knit material with embroidery and mirrors. The black fabric of the hat is covered with yellow embroidered star shapes and small circular mirrors ca. 1.5 cm. in diameter bordered by red thread embroidery/crochet. Cylindrical crown formed as slightly "crushed", folding in in some areas and bulging out in others, and with gently scalloped lower edge. Top is generally flat, with an applied tear-drop shaped section of the same material, with trailing "ribbons" of same material extending off of back of hat. The edge of the applied panel and the lower edge of the crown are edged with alternating red and black beads, with two strands and two loops of the same beading descending from the between the "ribbons" at top. The inside of the crown is lined in red mesh and edged with red grosgrain ribbon. There are two plastic combs, one at either side, to secure hat to wearer's head. Designer's label inside crown: "Bes-Ben / Made in Chicago" Gift of Mr. John C. Murphy, through the Chicago Historical Society.
Date: 1952
Creator: Green-Field, Benjamin B.
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Hatlet

Description: Hatlet of black velvet. Black velvet hatlet has a shallow domed crown edged with large upstanding "M" shapes and descending "V" shapes of black velvet edged with black beads. The overall effect is of a child's image of a coronet. The whole is overlaid with black net veil, with triplets of black beads worked into some intersections of the net. Crown is lined in black mesh netting and edged with black grosgrain ribbon. Two plastic combs inside crown help secure hat to wearer's head. Designer's Label: "Bes-Ben / Made in Chicago". Gift of Mr. John C. Murphy, through the Chicago Historical Society.
Date: 1955
Creator: Green-Field, Benjamin B.
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Hatlet

Description: Embroidered hatlet. Formed of two hollow teardrop shapes overlaid on each other and edged with tiny gold beads. The shapes are covered in light green satin with is heavily embroidered with flowers and leaves in red, blue, greens, yellow, brown, purple/lavender. At back of hat is a sculptural bow of the same materials, edged in gold beads and with a quadruple strand of the beads at the "knot". Overall is a brown net veil with attached embroidered pieces matching the embroidery on the hatlet. The hatlet is lined in brown knit, with a plastic comb attached at each side to secure hat to wearer's head. Sewn into lining is maker's label: "Bes-Ben / Made in Chicago". Gift of John C. Murphy, through the Chicago Historical Society.
Date: 1960
Creator: Green-Field, Benjamin B.
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Hatlet

Description: Hatlet of navy blue wool with embroidery and mirrors. Base of hatlet formed of an irregularly-shaped skullcap of dark navy blue wool decorated with embroidered lines, bands, etc. in red, yellow, and white. Over the surface of the fabric are small 1.5 cm. diameter mirrors in pink and red stitched borders. All edges are trimmed in gray/purple beads. Surmounting the hatlet are three bows of the same materials, and the whole is overlaid with fine dark blue veiling. Hatlet is lined in dark blue mesh and edged underneath with dark blue grosgrain ribbon. Attached to either side is a small plastic comb to secure the hatlet to wearer's head. Designer's label: "Bes-Ben / Made in Chicago". Gift of John C. Murphy, through the Chicago Historical Society.
Date: 1952
Creator: Green-Field, Benjamin B.
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Hatlet

Description: Hatlet of white beadwork. Base of hatlet is an irregularly shaped openwork skullcap of stiffened white mesh completely covered in white beads. Surmounting the cap are three 3-dimensional bow forms made of white beads. Hatlet has black mesh veiling, with scattered pairs of white beads worked into some intersections. Cap lined with stiffened white mesh. At either side are attached small plastic combs to secure hatlet to wearer's head. Designer's label: "Bes-Ben / Made in Chicago" Gift of John C. Murphy, through the Chicago Historical Society.
Date: 1970
Creator: Green-Field, Benjamin B.
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Pillbox Hat

Description: Hat of brown velvet. Pillbox hat with cylindrical crown of brown velvet, flat at top. Lower edge scalloped, edged with brown beads. The whole is overlaid with fine brown veiling. Lined in black mesh and edged with brown grosgrain ribbon inner hatband. Affixed to hatband are two plastic combs, one on either side, to secure hat to wearer's head. Designer's label inside crown: "Bes-Ben / Made in Chicago".
Date: 1965
Creator: Green-Field, Benjamin B.
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design