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Visualization of Acoustic Waves Propagating within a Single Anisotropic Crystalline Plate

Description: High frequency acoustic waves propagating within a thin anisotropic plate were imaged using a hybrid system consisting of an acoustic lens (Frequency: 200MHz; Point Focus) for point excitation on one side and a laser displacement interferometer for point detection on the opposite side. The laser beam spot was about 5µm diameter on the surface and the sample was scanned to provide an image of the lateral spatial distribution of the resultant displacement. Theoretical prediction of the resultant displacement was performed using the Angular Spectrum Analysis approach for propagation through the [100] oriented silicon. Comparison of the theoretical predictions with experimental measurements is presented.
Date: April 1, 2007
Creator: Miyasaka, Chiaki; Telschow, Kenneth L.; Sadler, Jeffry T. & Maev, Roman. Gr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fatigue Damage in CFRP Woven Fabric Composites through Dynamic Modulus Measurements

Description: Advanced fiber reinforced composite materials offer substantial advantages over metallic materials for the structural applications subjected to fatigue loading. With the increasing use of these composites, it is required to understand their mechanical response to cyclic loading (1)-(4). Our major concern in this work is to macroscopically evaluate the damage development in composites during fatigue loading. For this purpose, we examine what effect the fatigue damage may have on the material properties and how they can be related mathematically to each other. In general, as the damage initiates in composite materials and grows during cyclic loading, material properties such as modulus, residual strength and strain would vary and, in many cases, they may be significantly reduced because of the progressive accumulation of cracks. Therefore, the damage can be characterized by the change in material properties, which is expected to be available for non-destructive evaluation of the fatigue damage development in composites. Here, the tension-tension fatigue tests are firstly conducted on the plain woven fabric carbon fiber composites for different loading levels. In the fatigue tests, the dynamic elastic moduli are measured on real-time, which will decrease with an increasing number of cycles due to the degradation of stiffness. Then, the damage function presenting the damage development during fatigue loading is determined from the dynamic elastic moduli thus obtained, from which the damage function is formulated in terms of a number of cycles and an applied loading level. Finally, the damage function is shown to be applied for predicting the remaining lifetime of the CFRP composites subjected to two-stress level fatigue loading.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Miyasaka, Chiaki & Telschow, K. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laser Measurement of SAM Bulk and Surface Wave Amplitudes for Material Microstructure Analysis

Description: Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (SAM) at ultra high frequencies has proven to be a useful tool for investigating materials on the scale of individual grains. This technique is normally performed in a reflection mode from one side of a sample surface. Information about the generation and transmission of bulk acoustic waves into the material is inferred from the reflection signal amplitude. We present an adaptation to the SAM method whereby the acoustic bulk waves are directly visualized through laser acoustic detection. Ultrasonic waves were emitted from a nominal 200 MHz point focus acoustic lens into a thin silicon plate (thickness 75ìm) coupled with distilled water. A scanned laser beam detected the bulk and surface acoustic waves at the opposite surface of the thin silicon plate. Distinct amplitude patterns exhibiting the expected symmetry for Silicon were observed that alter in predictable ways as the acoustic focal point was moved throughout the plate. Predictions of the acoustic wave fields generated by the acoustic lens within and at the surface of the Silicon are being investigated through the angular spectrum of plane waves approach. Results shall be presented for plates with (100) and (111) orientations followed by discussion of applications of the technique for material microstructure analysis.
Date: July 1, 2005
Creator: Telschow, Ken L.; Miyasaka, Chiaki & Cottle, David L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

OSTEOBLAST ADHESION OF BREAST CANCER CELLS WITH SCANNING ACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY

Description: Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to the bone. Upon colonizing bone tissue, the cancer cells stimulate osteoclasts (cells that break bone down), resulting in large lesions in the bone. The breast cancer cells also affect osteoblasts (cells that build new bone). Conditioned medium was collected from a bone-metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, and cultured with an immature osteoblast cell line, MC3T3-E1. Under these conditions the osteoblasts acquired a changed morphology and appeared to adherer in a different way to the substrate and to each other. To characterize cell adhesion, MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured with or without MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium for two days, and then assayed with a mechanical scanning acoustic reflection microscope (SAM). The SAM indicated that in normal medium the MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were firmly attached to their plastic substrate. However, MC3T3-E1 cells cultured with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium displayed both an abnormal shape and poor adhesion at the substrate interface. The cells were fixed and stained to visualize cytoskeletal components using optical microscopic techniques. We were not able to observe these differences until the cells were quite confluent after 7 days of culture. However, using the SAM, we were able to detect these changes within 2 days of culture with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium
Date: March 1, 2005
Creator: Miyasaka, Chiaki; Mercer, Robyn R.; Mastro, Andrea M. & Telschow, Ken L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department