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Thermal Decomposition Characteristics of Orthorhombic Ammonium Perchlorate (o-AP)

Description: Preliminary STMBMS and SEM results of the thermal decomposition of AP in the orthorhombic phase are presented. The overall decomposition is shown to be complex and controlled by both physical and chemical processes. The data show that the physical and chemical processes can be probed and characterized utilizing SEM and STMBMS. The overall decomposition is characterized by three distinguishing features: an induction period, and accelerator period and a deceleratory period. The major decomposition event occurs in the subsurface of the AP particles and propagates towards the center of the particle with time. The amount of total decomposition is dependent upon particle size and increases from 23% for {approximately}50{micro}m-diameter AP to 33% for {approximately}200{micro}m-diameter AP. A conceptual model of the physical processes is presented. Insight into the chemical processes is provided by the gas formation rates that are measured for the gaseous products. To our knowledge, this is the first presentation of data showing that the chemical and physical decomposition processes can be identified from one another, probed and characterized at the level that is required to better understand the thermal decomposition behavior of AP. Future work is planned with the goal of obtaining data that can be used to develop a mathematical description for the thermal decomposition of o-AP.
Date: March 1, 1999
Creator: Behrens, R. & Minier, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The thermal decomposition behavior of ammonium perchlorate and of an ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellant

Description: The thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellants is studied using the simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) technique. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate whether the STMBMS can provide new data on these materials that will have sufficient detail on the reaction mechanisms and associated reaction kinetics to permit creation of a detailed model of the thermal decomposition process. Such a model is a necessary ingredient to engineering models of ignition and slow-cookoff for these AP-based composite propellants. Results show that the decomposition of pure AP is controlled by two processes. One occurs at lower temperatures (240 to 270 C), produces mainly H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O and HCl, and is shown to occur in the solid phase within the AP particles. 200{micro} diameter AP particles undergo 25% decomposition in the solid phase, whereas 20{micro} diameter AP particles undergo only 13% decomposition. The second process is dissociative sublimation of AP to NH{sub 3} + HClO{sub 4} followed by the decomposition of, and reaction between, these two products in the gas phase. The dissociative sublimation process occurs over the entire temperature range of AP decomposition, but only becomes dominant at temperatures above those for the solid-phase decomposition. AP-based composite propellants are used extensively in both small tactical rocket motors and large strategic rocket systems.
Date: March 24, 1998
Creator: Behrens, R. & Minier, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A study of the solid-phase thermal decomposition of NTO using simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS)

Description: The solid phase thermal reaction chemistry of NTO between 190 and 250 C is presently being evaluated by utilizing STMBMS, a technique that enables the authors to measure the vapor pressure of NTO and to explore the reaction mechanisms and chemical kinetics associated with the NTO thermal decomposition process. The vapor pressure of NTO is expressed as Log{sub 10} p(torr) = 12.5137 + 6,296.553(1/t{sub k}) and the {Delta}H{sub subl} = 28.71 {+-} 0.07 kcal/mol (120.01 {+-} 0.29 kJ/mol). The pyrolysis of NTO results in the formation of gaseous products and a condensed-phase residue. The identity of the major gaseous products and their origin from within the NTO molecules are determined based on the results from pyrolysis of NTO, NTO-3-{sup 13}C, NTO-1,2-{sup 15}N{sub 2} and NTO-{sup 2}H{sub 2}. Identification of the products show the major gaseous products to be N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, NO, HNCO, H{sub 2}O and some N{sub 2}O, CO, HCN and NH{sub 3}. The N{sub 2} is mostly derived from the N-1 and N-2 positions with some being from the N-4 and N-1 or N-2 positions. The CO{sub 2} is derived from both carbons in the NTO molecule in comparable amounts. The residue has an elemental formula of C{sub 2.1}H{sub .26}N{sub 2.9}O and FTIR analysis suggests that the residue is polyurea- and polycarbamate-like in nature. The temporal behaviors of the rates of formation of the gaseous products indicate that the overall thermal decomposition of NTO in the temperature range evaluated involves four major processes: (1) NTO sublimation; (2) an apparent solid-solid phase transition between 190 and 195 C; (3) a decomposition regime induced by the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O at the onset of decomposition; and (4) a decomposition regime that occurs at the onset of decomposition and continues until the depletion of NTO. Decomposition pathways that are ...
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Minier, L.; Behrens, R. & Burkey, T.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coupling experimental data and a prototype model to probe the physical and chemical processes of 2,4-dinitroimidazole solid-phase thermal decomposition

Description: The time-dependent, solid-phase thermal decomposition behavior of 2,4-dinitroimidazole (2,4-DNI) has been measured utilizing simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) methods. The decomposition products consist of gaseous and non-volatile polymeric products. The temporal behavior of the gas formation rates of the identified products indicate that the overall thermal decomposition process is complex. In isothermal experiments with 2,4-DNI in the solid phase, four distinguishing features are observed: (1) elevated rates of gas formation are observed during the early stages of the decomposition, which appear to be correlated to the presence of exogenous water in the sample; (2) this is followed by a period of relatively constant rates of gas formation; (3) next, the rates of gas formation accelerate, characteristic of an autocatalytic reaction; (4) finally, the 2,4-DNI is depleted and gaseous decomposition products continue to evolve at a decreasing rate. A physicochemical and mathematical model of the decomposition of 2,4-DNI has been developed and applied to the experimental results. The first generation of this model is described in this paper. Differences between the first generation of the model and the experimental data collected under different conditions suggest refinements for the next generation of the model.
Date: December 31, 1998
Creator: Behrens, R.; Minier, L. & Bulusu, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solid-phase thermal decomposition of 2,4-dinitroimidazole (2,4-DNI)

Description: The solid-phase thermal decomposition of the insensitive energetic nitroaromatic heterocycle 2,4-dinitroimidazole (2,4-DNI: mp 265--274C) is studied utilizing simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) between 200 and 247C. The pyrolysis products have been identified using perdeuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled isotopomers. The products consist of low molecular-weight gases and a thermally stable solid residue. The major gaseous products are NO, CO{sub 2}, CO, N{sub 2}, HNCO and H{sub 2}O. Minor gaseous products are HCN, C{sub 2}N{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}, C{sub 3}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, C{sub 3}H{sub 3}N{sub 3}O and NH{sub 3}. The elemental formula of the residue is C{sub 2}HN{sub 2}O and FTIR analysis suggests that it is polyurea- and polycarbamate-like in nature. Rates of formation of the gaseous products and their respective quantities have been determined for a typical isothermal decomposition experiment at 235C. The temporal behaviors of the gas formation rates indicate that the overall decomposition is characterized by a sequence of four events; (1) an early decomposition period induced by impurities and water, (2) an induction period where C0{sub 2} and NO are the primary products formed at relatively constant rates, (3) an autoacceleratory period that peaks when the sample is depleted and (4) a final period in which the residue decomposes. Arrhenius parameters for the induction period are E{sub a} = 46.9 {plus_minus} 0.7 kcal/mol and Log(A) = 16.3 {plus_minus} 0.3. Decomposition pathways that are consistent with the data are presented.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Minier, L.; Behrens, R. Jr. & Bulusu, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison of the thermal decompositions of HMX and 2,4-DNI for evaluation of slow cookoff response and long-term stability

Description: Thermal decomposition of HMX between 175C and 200C was studied using the simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometer with focus on initial stages of the decomposition. Thermal decomposition products are the same as in previous higher temperature experiments. The initial stages of the decomposition have an induction period followed by two acceleratory periods. Arrhenius parameters for the induction and two acceleratory periods are (Log(A)= 18.2 {plus_minus} 0.8, Ea = 48.2 {plus_minus} 1.8 kcal/mole), (Log (A) = 17.15 {plus_minus} 1.5 and Ea = 48.9 {plus_minus} 3.2 kcal/mole), (Log (A) = 19.1 {plus_minus} 3.0 and Ea = 52.1 {plus_minus} 6.3 kcal/mole). This data can be used to calculate the time and temperature required to decompose a desired fraction of a test sample testing the effect of thermal degradation on sensitivity or bum rates. It can also be used to estimate the extent of decomposition expected under normal storage conditions for munitions containing HMX. This data, along with previous mechanistic studies conducted at higher temperatures, suggest that the process that controls the early stages of decomposition of HMX in the solid phase is scission of the N-NO{sub 2} bond, reaction of the N0{sub 2} within a lattice cage to form the mononitroso analogue of HMX and decomposition of the mononitroso HMX within the HMX lattice to form gaseous products that are retained in bubbles or diffuse into the surrounding lattice. These methods evaluating HMX can be used to evaluate new energetic materials such as 2,4-DNI. The early 2,4-DNI thermal decomposition is characterized by an initial decomposition, an apparent induction period, then an initial acceleratory period. The main gaseous products are NO, C0{sub 2}, HNCO, H{sub 2}0, N{sub 2}, CO, HCN and C{sub 2}N{sub 2}. The presence of adsorbed and occluded H{sub 2}0 is the major cause of the early decomposition.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Minier, L.; Behrens, R. & Bulusu, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Polymer Aging Techniques Applied to Degradation of a Polyurethane Propellant Binder

Description: The oxidative thermal aging of a crosslinked hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB)/isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) polyurethane rubber, commonly used as the polymeric binder matrix in solid rocket propellants, was studied at temperatures of RT to 125 C. We investigate changes in tensile elongation, mechanical hardening, polymer network properties, density, O{sub 2} permeation and molecular chain dynamics using a range of techniques including solvent swelling, detailed modulus profiling and NMR relaxation measurements. Using extensive data superposition and highly sensitive oxygen consumption measurements, we critically evaluate the Arrhenius methodology, which normally assumes a linear extrapolation of high temperature aging data. Significant curvature in the Arrhenius diagram of these oxidation rates was observed similar to previous results found for other rubber materials. Preliminary gel/network properties suggest that crosslinking is the dominant process at higher temperatures. We also assess the importance of other constituents such as ammonium perchlorate or aluminum powder in the propellant formulation.
Date: July 27, 1999
Creator: Assink, R.A.; Celina, M.; Graham, A.C. & Minier, L.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal Degradation Studies of A Polyurethane Propellant Binder

Description: The thermal oxidative aging of a crosslinked hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB)/isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) based polyurethane rubber, used as a polymeric binder in solid propellant grain, was investigated at temperatures from 25 C to 125 C. The changes in tensile elongation, polymer network properties and chain dynamics, mechanical hardening and density were determined with a range of techniques including modulus profiling, solvent swelling, NMR relaxation and O{sub 2} permeability measurements. We critically evaluated the Arrhenius methodology that is commonly used with a linear extrapolation of high temperature aging data using extensive data superposition and highly sensitive oxygen consumption experiments. The effects of other constituents in the propellant formulation on aging were also investigated. We conclude that crosslinking is the dominant process at higher temperatures and that the degradation involves only limited hardening in the bulk of the material. Significant curvature in the Arrhenius diagram of the oxidation rates was observed. This is similar to results for other rubber materials.
Date: June 12, 1999
Creator: Assink, R.A.; Celina, M.; Gillen, K.T.; Graham, A.C. & Minier, L.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department