284 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Monte Carlo simulation of neutral beam injection into fusion reactors

Description: Motivations and techniques for the Monte Carlo computer simulation of energetic neutral beam injection for fusion reactors are described. The versatility of this approach allows a significantly more sophisticated treatment of charge transfer collision phenomena and consequent effects on engineering design than available from prior work. Exemplary results for a mirror Fusion Engineering Research Facility (FERF) are discussed. (auth)
Date: September 15, 1975
Creator: Miller, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Determination of basalt physical and thermal properties at varying temperatures, pressures, and moisture contents. Third progress report, fiscal year 1979

Description: The rock mechanics testing performed at the Earth Mechanics Institute of the Colorado School of Mines for Rockwell Hanford Operations under subcontract SA-917 is summarized. Cores were supplied from drill hole DC-4 on the Hanford Site, characterized geologically, and tested for thermal and physical properties for designing long-term underground storage of radioactive waste materials. The approved test procedures, results, and data analysis for this test series are presented. Uniaxial and triaxial results indicate strengths similar to drill hole DC-6, but significantly higher than drill hole DC-8. Trends with density, depth, confining pressure, and temperature, however, were similar for the three drill hole locations tested.
Date: August 31, 1979
Creator: Miller, R.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wind loads on flat plate photovoltaic array fields. Phase II. Final report

Description: This report describes a theoretical study of the aerodynamic forces resulting from winds acting on flat plate photovoltaic arrays. Local pressure distributions and total aerodynamic forces on the arrays are shown. Design loads are presented to cover the conditions of array angles relative to the ground from 20/sup 0/ to 60/sup 0/, variable array spacings, a ground clearance gap up to 1.2 m (4 ft) and array slant heights of 2.4 m (8 ft) and 4.8 m (16 ft). Several means of alleviating the wind loads on the arrays are detailed. The expected reduction of the steady state wind velocity with the use of fences as a load alleviation device are indicated to be in excess of a factor of three for some conditions. This yields steady state wind load reductions as much as a factor of ten compared to the load incurred if no fence is used to protect the arrays. This steady state wind load reduction is offset by the increase in turbulence due to the fence but still an overall load reduction of 2.5 can be realized. Other load alleviation devices suggested are the installation of air gaps in the arrays, blocking the flow under the arrays and rounding the edges of the array. Included is an outline of a wind tunnel test plan to supplement the theoretical study and to evaluate the load alleviation devices.
Date: September 1, 1979
Creator: Miller, R. & Zimmerman, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Determination of basalt physical and thermal properties at varying temperatures, pressures, and moisture contents. Second progress report, fiscal year 1979

Description: The rock mechanics testing performed at the Earth Mechanics Institute of the Colorado School of Mines for Rockwell Hanford Operations under Subcontract SA-917 is summarized. Cores were supplied from drill hole DC-8 on the Hanford Site, characterized geologically, and tested for thermal and physical properties for designing long-term underground storage of radioactive waste materials. This report presents the approved test procedures, results, and data analysis for this test series. Results indicate significantly lower strengths for drill hole DC-8 than determined for drill hole DC-6 or for the drill holes reported on in our fiscal year 1978 (FY 78) tests. Trends, however, were found to be similar between drill holes DC-6 and DC-8, and it is hoped more definitive conclusions can be found following completion of the final series of tests.
Date: August 13, 1979
Creator: Miller, R.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of burnup on fuel failure. Power burst tests on fuel rods with 13,000 and 32,000 MWd/MTU burnup

Description: Results are presented from preliminary tests designed to investigate the behavior of preirradiated fuel rods under reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions. The tests were conducted in 1970 as part of the SPERT/Capsule Driver Core (CDC) program. The report was intended to be published in a series of Idaho Nuclear Corporation Interim Technical Reports (IN-ITRs); however, the CDC program was terminated before the report could be released. In September 1975, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission concluded that the data contained in the report could be a valuable reference in planning future water reactor safety program tests and requested its release.
Date: January 1, 1976
Creator: Miller, R.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recent progress in stellarator reactor conceptual design

Description: The Stellarator/Torsatron/Heliotron (S/T/H) class of toroidal magnetic fusion reactor designs continues to offer a distinct and in several ways superior approach to eventual commercial competitiveness. Although no major, integrated conceptual reactor design activity is presently underway, a number of international research efforts suggest avenues for the substantial improvement of the S/T/H reactor embodiment, which derive from recent experimental and theoretical progress and are responsive to current trends in fusion-reactor projection to set the stage for a third generation of designs. Recent S/T/H reactor design activity is reviewed and the impact of the changing technical and programmatic context on the direction of future S/T/H reactor design studies is outlined.
Date: January 1, 1985
Creator: Miller, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor: Design-point determination and parametric studies

Description: The multi-institutional TITAN study has examined the physics, technology, safety, and economics issues associated with the operation of a Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) magnetic fusion reactor at high power density. A comprehensive system and trade study have been conducted as an integral and ongoing part of the reactor assessment. Attractive design points emerging from these parametric studies are subjected to more detailed analysis and design integration, the results of which are used to refine the parametric systems model. The design points and tradeoffs for two TITAN/RFP reactor embodiments are discussed. 14 refs.
Date: January 1, 1987
Creator: Miller, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison of standing-wave and traveling-wave structures

Description: The controversy over the relative advantages of standing-wave and traveling-wave linear accelerators is now in its fourth decade. It has been fed by a considerable body of misinformation. The author hopes in this paper to shed some light on the subject, and expose some of the falsehoods. The discussion is directed toward the question of which structure to use for short pulse high field electron accelerators since it is almost universally accepted that standing-wave structures are appropriate for CW and long pulse accelerators. Three arguments against standing-wave accelerators are discussed and shown to be invalid.
Date: April 1, 1986
Creator: Miller, R.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of short-term corrosion evaluation tests at Raft River

Description: Four categories of short-term materials evaluation tests were conducted in geothermal fluid from Raft River Geothermal Experiment, Well No. 1, to obtain corrosion data relevant to the design of the Raft River Thermal Loop Facility. Test programs are described and the testing philosophies are discussed. All materials and configurations which were tested are identified and details of posttest visual examinations are presented. The materials are then assigned to appropriate performance categories on the basis of test behavior, and the possible service limitations are appraised.
Date: October 1, 1977
Creator: Miller, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrosion of copper base alloys in a geothermal brine. SPE Paper No. 7881

Description: The geothermal environment and the experimental procedures and schedules for corrosion tests of copper-base alloys are described. Corrosive attack on these materials was mostly uniform. Some selective leaching of alloying elements was observed, as was crevice corrosion, but the extent of these forms of corrosion was minor. The results of these tests show a trend toward higher corrosion rates with increasing copper content, for the brass alloys. Commercially pure copper, however, showed corrosion rates 20 to 30% of that suggested by the trend in the data. One copper--nickel alloy was tested to verify earlier test data; this alloy showed a corrosion rate about six times that of a brass of similar copper content. The primary agent of the corrosive attack was hydrogen sulfide, present in the water in trace amounts. The primary conclusion from these tests is that copper--zinc alloys are the most economical materials for boiler and preheater construction. The recommendation is made that materials be selected from these brasses: naval brass, yellow brass, admiralty brass, and copper, in this order of decreasing desirability. Aluminum brass and red brass are marginally acceptable. Copper--nickel alloys are unacceptable for boiler and preheater heat exchangers.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Miller, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chemistry and materials in geothermal systems

Description: The development of a geothermal fluid, from its origin as meteoric water precipitating on the earth's surface, as it flows through the soils and rocks of geological formations, to the point where it returns to the surface as a hot spring, geyser, well, etc. is traced. Water of magmatic origin is also included. The tendency of these hydrothermal fluids to form scales by precipitation of a portion of their dissolved solids is noted. A discussion is presented of types of information required for materials selection for energy systems utilizing geothermal fluids, including pH, temperature, the speciation of the particular geothermal fluid (particularly chloride, sulfide and carbon dioxide content) and various types of corrosive attack on common materials. Specific examplers of materials response to geothermal fluid are given.
Date: May 1, 1979
Creator: Miller, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Atmospheric dispersion modeling and meteorological monitoring in support of emergency planning and response for the US Army's Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program

Description: This technical memorandum examines the role of atmospheric dispersion modeling and meteorological monitoring in support of emergency planning and response for the US Army's Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). Air dispersion modeling and meteorological monitoring are expected to form key components in integrated accident assessment and warning systems at each of the eight CSDP installations. This report assesses the capabilities of operating state-of-the-art systems in order to establish a baseline for developing the requirements of the CSDP systems. A general tutorial on the types of atmospheric dispersion models currently available is provided, and the criteria for selection of emergency response models are developed. The requirements for meteorological monitoring are also described. In addition, the basic limitations of modeling and monitoring are discussed, and the importance of model verification is emphasized. Staffing requirements to operate an integrated modeling and monitoring system are characterized. The current state of modeling, monitoring, and staffing levels in support of emergency response at the eight US Army chemical stockpile depots involved in the CSDP is examined. Specific requirements appropriate to emergency planning and response at each of the eight sites are described. Recommendations are made for both the integrated system and the individual components of air dispersion modeling and meteorological monitoring. Finally, future work required to prepare for emergency response is discussed. 22 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.
Date: August 1, 1990
Creator: Miller, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DIE Deflection Modeling: Empirical Validation and Tech Transfer

Description: This report summarizes computer modeling work that was designed to help understand how the die casting die and machine contribute to parting plane separation during operation. Techniques developed in earlier research (8) were applied to complete a large computational experiment that systematically explored the relationship between the stiffness of the machine platens and key dimensional and structural variables (platen area covered, die thickness, platen thickness, thickness of insert and the location of the die with respect to the platen) describing the die/machine system. The results consistently show that there are many significant interactions among the variables and it is the interactions, more than the individual variables themselves, which determine the performance of the machine/die system. That said, the results consistently show that it is the stiffness of the machine platens that has the largest single impact on die separation.
Date: May 28, 2003
Creator: Miller, R. Allen
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling the Mechanical Performance of Die Casting Dies

Description: The following report covers work performed at Ohio State on modeling the mechanical performance of dies. The focus of the project was development and particularly verification of finite element techniques used to model and predict displacements and stresses in die casting dies. The work entails a major case study performed with and industrial partner on a production die and laboratory experiments performed at Ohio State.
Date: February 27, 2004
Creator: Miller, R. Allen
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Synthesis of New Water-Soluble Metal-Binding Polymers combinatorial Chemistry Approach

Description: (1) Synthesis of Fused Tetraheterocyclic Azepines: (2) Synthesis of Linear Bidentate Diisoxazole and Bidentate Isoxazole-Furyl/Thienyl/Pyridyl Motifs: (3) Synthesis of Pyrazolo[3,4-g] [2,1] dihydrobenzoisoxazol(in)es: (4) Synthesis of Spiro-Fused (C5)-Isozazoline-(C4)-Pyrazolones:
Date: May 7, 2004
Creator: Miller, R. Bryan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Use of hodoscopes at ISABELLE

Description: A major problem for experimenters designing detectors for use at ISABELLE is the high interaction rate, one event every 25 nanoseconds at a luminosity of 10/sup 33/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/. Typical multiplicities range from a few at large angles (> approximately 45/sup 0/) to approximately 10 nearer the forward direction. This implies average rates as high as a particle every few nanoseconds. For experiments which require high luminosities, detectors must be designed which have very short (approximately 1 nsec) response time and/or intercept a small solid angle per element. These requirements are met by fine-grained scintillation counter hodoscopes. However, it is, at present, impractical to maintain a 10,000 element hodoscope array because of the difficulty of light piping, the complexity and expense of maintaining that many phototubes, and the problems of packaging and readout. Several developments which promise to make such large arrays feasible are discussed.
Date: January 1, 1977
Creator: Alspector, J. & Miller, R.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New method for positron production at SLAC

Description: The focusing system for the positron beam at SLAC makes use of an adiabatically tapered solenoid whose transverse acceptance remains high over a broad energy band. From the computed distribution in energy of the accepted positrons, one can estimate that approximately one-half of the total number of positrons lies within the energy band from 2 - 4 MeV. Due to the debunching effect over the drift space following the target, only the high energy part (from 4.5 MeV to 10 MeV or more) of the accepted spectrum contributes to the useful current (within 1% energy bin). By decelerating the beam in a special short section very near the converter it is possible to obtain a bunching of all the accepted positrons with energy above 2 MeV within approximately 5/sup 0/, giving an improvement of a factor of two on the analyzed current.
Date: September 1, 1979
Creator: Aune, B. & Miller, R.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a Software Framework for System-Level Carbon Sequestration Risk Assessment

Description: The overall purpose of this project was to identify, evaluate, select, develop, and test a suite of enhancements to the GoldSim software program, in order to make it a better tool for use in support of Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) projects. The GoldSim software is a foundational tool used by scientists at NETL and at other laboratories and research institutions to evaluate system-level risks of proposed CCS projects. The primary product of the project was a series of successively improved versions of the GoldSim software, supported by an extensive User’s Guide. All of the enhancements were tested by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and several of the enhancements have already been incorporated into the CO{sub 2}-PENS sequestration model.
Date: February 28, 2013
Creator: Miller, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity

Description: This report describes work completed during the fifth quarter of a three year project to study the effects of mild chemical pretreatment on coal dissolution reactivity during low severity liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate changes in the chemical and physical structure of coal by pretreating with methanol or other simple organic solvent and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid and measure the influence of these changes on coal dissolution reactivity. Work this quarter focused on analytical characterization of untreated and treated Wyodak subbituminous coal and Illinois {number sign}6 bituminous coal. Mossbauer spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction techniques were used to study the effect of methanol/HCl pretreatment on the composition of each coal's inorganic phase. Results from these studies indicated that calcite is largely removed during pretreatment, but that other mineral species such as pyrite are unaffected. This finding is significant, since calcite removal appears to directly correlate with low severity liquefaction enhancement. Further work will be performed to study this phenomenon in more detail.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Miller, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department