51 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Foreign research reactor irradiated nuclear fuel inventories containing HEU and LEU of United States origin

Description: This report provides estimates of foreign research reactor inventories of aluminum-based and TRIGA irradiated nuclear fuel elements containing highly enriched and low enriched uranium of United States origin that are anticipated in January 1996, January 2001, and January 2006. These fuels from 104 research reactors in 41 countries are the same aluminum-based and TRIGA fuels that were eligible for receipt under the Department of Energy`s Offsite Fuels Policy that was in effect in 1988. All fuel inventory and reactor data that were available as of December 1, 1994, have been included in the estimates of approximately 14,300 irradiated fuel elements in January 1996, 18,800 in January 2001, and 22,700 in January 2006.
Date: December 1, 1994
Creator: Matos, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The LEU conversion status of U.S. Research Reactors.

Description: This paper summarizes the conversion status of US research and test reactors and estimates uranium densities needed to convert reactors with power levels 21 MW from HEU ({ge} 20% U-235) to LEU (<20% U-235) fuels. Detailed conversion studies for each reactor need to be completed in order to establish the feasibility of using LEU fuels.
Date: November 14, 1997
Creator: Matos, J. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nuclear criticality assessment of LEU and HEU element storage

Description: Criticality aspects of storing LEU (20%) and HEU (93%) fuel elements have been evaluated as a function of /sup 235/U loading, element geometry, and fuel type. Silicide, oxide, and aluminide fuel types have been evaluated ranging in /sup 235/U loading from 180 to 620 g per element and from 16 to 23 plates per element. Storage geometry considerations have been evaluated for fuel element separations ranging from closely packed formations to spacings of several centimeters between elements. Data are presented in a form in which interpolations may be made to estimate the eigenvalue of any fuel element storage configuration that is within the range of the data.
Date: January 1, 1983
Creator: Pond, R.B. & Matos, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fuel cycle cost study with HEU and LEU fuels

Description: Fuel cycle costs are compared for a range of /sup 235/U loadings with HEU and LEU fuels using the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor as an example. If LEU silicide fuels are successfully demonstrated and licensed, the results indicate that total fuel cycle costs can be about the same or lower than those with the HEU fuels that are currently used in most research reactors.
Date: January 1, 1984
Creator: Matos, J.E. & Freese, K.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mixed core conversion study with HEU and LEU fuels

Description: The results of a mixed core study are presented for gradual replacement of HEU fuel with LEU fuel using the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor as an example. The key parameters show that the transition can be accomplished safely and economically.
Date: January 1, 1984
Creator: Matos, J.E. & Freese, K.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fuel-cycle cost comparisons with oxide and silicide fuels

Description: This paper addresses fuel cycle cost comparisons for a generic 10 MW reactor with HEU aluminide fuel and with LEU oxide and silicide fuels in several fuel element geometries. The intention of this study is to provide a consistent assessment of various design options from a cost point of view. Fuel cycle cost benefits could result if a number of reactors were to utilize fuel elements with the same number or different numbers of the same standard fuel plate. Data are presented to quantify these potential cost benefits. This analysis shows that there are a number of fuel element designs using LEU oxide or silicide fuels that have either the same or lower total fuel cycle costs than the HEU design. Use of these fuels with the uranium densities considered requires that they are successfully demonstrated and licensed.
Date: January 1, 1982
Creator: Matos, J.E. & Freese, K.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effect of changes in DOE pricing policies for enrichment and reprocessing on research reactor fuel cycle costs

Description: Fuel cycle costs with HEU and LEU fuels for the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor are updated to reflect the change in DOE pricing policy for enrichment services as of October 1985 and the published charges for LEU reprocessing services as of February 1986. The net effects are essentially no change in HEU fuel cycle costs and a reduction of about 8 to 10% in the fuel cycle costs for LEU silicide fuel.
Date: November 3, 1986
Creator: Matos, J. E. & Freese, K. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Criticality calculations for the VR-1 reactor with IRT-3M-HEU fuel and IRT-4MLEU fuel.

Description: At The request of the Czech Technical University in Prague, ANL has performed independent verification calculations using the MCNP Monte Carlo code for three core configurations of the VR-1 reactor: a current core configuration B1 with HEU (36%) IRT-3M fuel assemblies and planned core configurations C1 and C2 with LEU (19.7%) IRT-4M fuel assemblies. Details of these configurations were provided to ANL by CTU. For core configuration B1, criticality calculations were performed for two sets of control rod positions provided to ANL by CTU. For core configurations C1 and C2, criticality calculations were done for cases with all control rods at the top positions, all control rods at the bottom positions, and two critical states of the reactor for different control rod positions. In addition, sensitivity studies for variation of the {sup 235}U mass in each fuel assembly and variation of the fuel meat and cladding thicknesses in each of the fuel tubes were done for the C1 core configuration. Finally the reactivity worth of the individual control rods was calculated for the B1, C1, and C2 core configurations.
Date: January 17, 2007
Creator: Hanan, N. A. & Matos, J. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium - options and costs

Description: The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a policy statement expressing its concern and has published a proposed rule on limiting the use of HEU in NRC-licensed non-power reactors. The fuel options, functional impacts, licensing, and scheduling of conversion and standardization of these reactor fuels to use of low-enrichment uranium (LEU) have been assessed. The university reactors span a wide range in form and function, from medium-power intense neutron sources where HEU fuel may be required, to low-power training and research facilities where HEU fuel is unnecessary. Conversion provides an opportunity to standardize university reactor fuels and improve reactor utilization in some cases. The entire program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years. Planning for conversion and standardization is facilitated by the US Department of Energy. 20 refs., 1 tab.
Date: January 1, 1985
Creator: Harris, D.R.; Matos, J.E. & Young, H.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conversion, core redesign and upgrade of the Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission Reactor

Description: The 2 MW Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission reactor is required to convert from the use of High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel using a standard LEU fuel plate which is thinner and contains more uranium-235 than the current HEU plate. These differences, coupled with the fact that the conversion should be accomplished without serious degradation of reactor characteristics and capability, has resulted in core design studies and thermal hydraulic studies not only at the current 2 MW but also at the maximum power level of the reactor, 5 MW. In addition, during the course of its 23 years of operation, it has become clear that the main uses of the reactor are neutron scattering and neutron activation analysis. The requirement to convert to LEU presents an opportunity during the conversion to optimize the core for the utilization and to restudy the thermal hydraulics using modern techniques. This paper will present the preliminary conclusions of both aspects.
Date: January 1, 1987
Creator: DiMeglio, A.F.; Matos, J.E. & Freese, K.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies

Description: As part of the Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel acceptance criteria, the mass of uranium and transuranic elements in spent research reactor fuel must be specified. These data are, however, not always known or readily determined. It is the purpose of this report to provide estimates of these data for some of the more common research reactor fuel assembly types. The specific types considered here are MTR, TRIGA and DIDO fuel assemblies. The degree of physical protection given to spent fuel assemblies is largely dependent upon the photon dose rate of the spent fuel material. These data also, are not always known or readily determined. Because of a self-protecting dose rate level of radiation (dose rate greater than 100 ren-x/h at I m in air), it is important to know the dose rate of spent fuel assemblies at all time. Estimates of the photon dose rate for spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are given in this report.
Date: May 1, 1996
Creator: Pond, R.B. & Matos, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Neutronic performance of high-density LEU fuels in water-moderated and water-reflected research reactors

Description: At the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) meeting in September 1994, Durand reported that the maximum uranium loading attainable with U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel is about 6.0 g U/cm{sup 3}. The French Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique (CEA) plan to perform irradiation tests with 5 plates at this loading. Compagnie pour L`Etude et La Realisation de Combustibles Atomiques (CERCA) has also fabricated a few uranium nitride (UN) plates with a uranium density in the fuel meat of 7.0 g/cm{sup 3} and found that UN is compatible with the aluminum matrix at temperatures below 500 C. High density dispersion fuels proposed for development include U-Zr(4 wt%)-Nb(2 wt%), U-Mo(5 wt%), and U-Mo(9 wt%). The purpose of this note is to examine the relative neutronic behavior of these high density fuels in a typical light water-reflected and water-moderated MTR-type research reactor. The results show that a dispersion of the U-Zr-Nb alloy has the most favorable neutronic properties and offers the potential for uranium densities greater than 8.0 g/cm{sup 3}. On the other hand, UN is the least reactive fuel because of the relatively large {sup 14}N(n,p) cross section. For a fixed value of k{sub eff}, the required {sup 235}U loading per fuel element is least for the U-Zr-Nb fuel and steadily increases for the U-Mo(5%), U-Mo(9%), and UN fuels. Because of volume fraction limitations, the UO{sub 2} dispersions are only useful for uranium densities below 5.0 g/cm{sup 3}. In this density range, however, UO{sub 2} is more reactive than U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Bretscher, M.M. & Matos, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Photon dose rates from spent fuel assemblies with relation to self-protection (Rev. 1)

Description: Photon dose rates as a function of fission product decay times have been calculated for spent fuel assemblies typical of MTR-type research and test reactors. Based upon these dose rates, the length of time that a spent fuel assembly will be self-protecting (dose rate greater than 100 rem/h at 1 m in air) can be estimated knowing the mass of fuel burned, the fraction of fuel burned, and the fuel assembly specific power density.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Pond, R.B. & Matos, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Photon dose rates from spent fuel assemblies with relation to self- protection

Description: Photon dose rates as a function of fission product decay times have been calculated for spent fuel assemblies typical of MTR-type research and test reactors. Based upon these dose rates, the length of time that a spent fuel assembly will be self-protecting (dose rate greater than 100 rem/h at 1 m in air) can be estimated knowing the mass of fuel burned, the fraction of fuel burned, and the fuel assembly specific power density. The calculated dose rates cover 20 years of fission product decay, spent fuel with up to 80% {sup 235}U burnup and assembly power densities ranging from 0.089 to 2.857 MW/kg{sup 235}U. Most of the results are unshielded dose rates at 1 m in air with some shielded dose rates at 40 cm in water. Dose rate sensitivity estimates have been evaluated for a variety of MTR fuel assembly designs and for uncertainties in both the physical and analytical models of the fuel assemblies.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Pond, R.B. & Matos, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Neutronic analysis of the JMTR with LEU fuel and burnable poison

Description: The results of neutronics calculations are presented for the JMTR equilibrium core with LEU silicide fuel, boron and cadmium burnable poisons in the sideplates, and a cycle length of 24 days instead of 11 days with the current HEU fuel. The data indicate that several options are feasible provided that silicide fuels with high uranium densities are successfully demonstrated and licensed. 2 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.
Date: January 1, 1984
Creator: Nagaoka, Yoshiharu; Oyamada, Rokuro; Matos, J.E. & Woodruff, W.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium: Plans and schedules

Description: The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. To minimize this risk, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued its final rule on ''Limiting the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Domestically Licensed Research and Test Reactors,'' in February 1986. This paper describes the plans and schedules developed by the US Department of Energy to coordinate an orderly transition from HEU to LEU fuel in most of these reactors. An important element in the planning process has been the desire to standardize the LEU fuels used in US university reactors and to enhance the performance and utilization of a number of these reactors. The program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years.
Date: January 1, 1986
Creator: Young, H.H.; Brown, K.R. & Matos, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance and fuel-cycle cost analysis of one JANUS 30 conceptual design for several fuel-element-design options

Description: The performance and fuel cycle costs for a 25 MW, JANUS 30 reactor conceptual design by INTERATOM, Federal Republic of Germany, for BATAN, Republic of Indonesia have been studied using 19.75% enriched uranium in four fuel element design options. All of these fuel element designs have either been proposed by INTERATOM for various reactors or are currently in use with 93% enriched uranium in reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany. Aluminide, oxide, and silicide fuels were studied for selected designs using the range of uranium densities that are either currently qualified or are being developed and demonstrated internationally. To assess the long-term fuel adaptation strategy as well as the present fuel acceptance, reactor performance and annual fuel cycle costs were computed for seventeen cases based on a representative end-of-cycle excess reactivity and duty factor. In addition, a study was made to provide data for evaluating the trade-off between the increased safety associated with thicker cladding and the economic penalty due to increased fuel consumption.
Date: January 1, 1982
Creator: Nurdin, M.; Matos, J.E. & Freese, K.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance and fuel cycle cost study of the R2 reactor with HEU and LEU fuels

Description: A systematic study of the experiment performance and fuel cycle costs of the 50 MW R2 reactor operated by Studsvik Energiteknik AB has been performed using the current R2 HEU fuel, a variety of LEU fuel element designs, and two core-box/reflector configurations. The results include the relative performance of both in-core and ex-core experiments, control rod worths, and relative annual fuel cycle costs.
Date: January 1, 1984
Creator: Pond, R.B.; Freese, K.E. & Matos, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radiological consequence analysis with HEU and LEU fuels

Description: A model for estimating the radiological consequences from a hypothetical accident in HEU and LEU fueled research and test reactors is presented. Simple hand calculations based on fission product yield table inventories and non-site specific dispersion data may be adequate in many cases. However, more detailed inventories and site specific data on meteorological conditions and release rates and heights can result in substantial reductions in the dose estimates. LEU fuel gives essentially the same doses as HEU fuel. The plutonium buildup in the LEU fuel does not significantly increase the radiological consequences. The dose to the thyroid is the limiting dose. 10 references, 3 figures, 7 tables.
Date: January 1, 1984
Creator: Woodruff, W.L.; Warinner, D.K. & Matos, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison of safety parameters and transient behavior of a generic 10 MW reactor with HEU and LEU fuels

Description: Key safety parameters are compared for equilibrium cores of the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor with HEU and LEU fuels. These parameters include kinetics parameters, reactivity feedback coefficients, control rod worths, power peaking factors, and shutdown margins. Reactivity insertion and loss-of-flow transients are compared. Results indicate that HEU and LEU cores will behave in a very similar manner.
Date: January 1, 1983
Creator: Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E. & Woodruff, W.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conversion feasibility studies for the Grenoble high flux reactor

Description: Feasibility studies for conversion of the High Flux Reactor (RHF) at Grenoble France have been performed at the Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL). The uranium densities required for conversion of the RHF to reduced enrichment fuels were computed to be 7.9 g/cm{sup 3} with 20% enrichment, 4.8 g/cm{sup 3} with 29% enrichment, and 2.8 g/cm{sup 3} with 45% enrichment. Thermal flux reductions at the peak in the heavy water reflector were computed to be 3% with 45% enriched fuel and 7% with 20% enriched fuel. In each case, the reactor's 44 day cycle length was preserved and no changes were made in the fuel element geometry. If the cladding thickness could be reduced from 0.38 mm to 0.30 mm, the required uranium density with 20% enrichment would be about 6.0 g/cm{sup 3} and the thermal flux reduction at the peak in the heavy water reflector would be about 7%. Significantly higher uranium densities are required in the RHF than in heavy water reactors with more conventional designs because the neutron spectrum is much harder in the RHF. Reduced enrichment fuels with the uranium densities required for use in the RHF are either not available or are not licensable at the present time. 6 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Mo, S.C. & Matos, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conversion Analyses for the VR-1 Reactor, part I and II.

Description: At the request of the Czech Technical University (CTU) in Prague, ANL has performed independent verification calculations using the MCNP Monte Carlo code for three core configurations of the VR-1 reactor: a current core configuration B1 with HEU (36%) IRT-3M fuel assemblies and planned core configurations C1 and C2 with LEU (19.7%) IRT-4M fuel assemblies. Details of these configurations were provided to ANL by CTU. For core configuration B1, criticality calculations were performed for two sets of control rod positions provided to ANL by CTU. Fore core configurations C1 and C2, criticality calculations were done for cases with all control rods at the top positions, all control rods at the bottom positions, and two critical states of the reactor for different control rod positions. In addition, sensitivity studies for variation of the {sup 235}U mass in each fuel assembly and variation of the fuel meat and cladding thicknesses in each of the fuel tubes were doe for the C1 core configuration. The reactivity worth of the individual control rods was calculated for the B1, C1, and C2 core configurations. Finally, the reactivity feedback coefficients, the prompt neutron lifetime, and the total effective delay neutron fraction were calculated for each of the three cores.
Date: November 14, 2005
Creator: Hannan, N. A.; Matos, J. E.; Stillman, J. A.; Olson, A. P. & Garner, P.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of the KUCA MEU experiments using the ANL code system

Description: This paper provides some preliminary results on the analysis of the KUCA critical experiments using the ANL code system. Since this system was employed in the earlier neutronics calculations for the KUHFR, it is important to assess its capabilities for the KUHFR. The KUHFR has a unique core configuration which is difficult to model precisely with current diffusion theory codes. This paper also provides some results from a finite-element diffusion code (2D-FEM-KUR), which was developed in a cooperative research program between KURRI and JAERI. This code provides the capability for mockup of a complex core configuration as the KUHFR. Using the same group constants generated by the EPRI-CELL code, the results of the 2D-FEM-KUR code are compared with the finite difference diffusion code (DIF3D(2D) which is mainly employed in this analysis.
Date: January 1, 1982
Creator: Shiroya, S.; Hayashi, M.; Kanda, K.; Shibata, T.; Woodruff, W.L. & Matos, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LEU conversion status of US research reactors, September 1996

Description: This paper summarizes the conversion status of research and test reactors in the United States from the use of fuels containing highly- enriched uranium (HEU, greater than or equal to 20%) to the use of fuels containing low-enriched uranium (LEU, < 20%). Estimates of the uranium densities required for conversion are made for reactors with power levels greater than or equal to 1 MW that are not currently involved in the LEU conversion process.
Date: October 7, 1996
Creator: Matos, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department