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The effect of silica-containing binders on the titanium/face coat reaction

Description: The interactions of CP-Ti and Ti-6Al-4V with investment molds containing alumina/silica and yttria/silica face coat systems were studied. Containerless melting in a vacuum was employed and small test samples were made by drop casting into the molds. The effects of the face coat material and mold preheat temperatures on the thickness of the alpha case on the castings were evaluated with microhardness and microprobe measurements. It was found that the thickness of the alpha case was the same, whether a yttria/silica or alumina/silica face coat was used, indicating that the silica binder reacted with the titanium. Hence, the use of expensive refractories, such as yttria, represents an unnecessary cost when combined with a silica binder. It was also found that the alloyed titanium castings had a thinner alpha case than those produced from CP-Ti, which suggests that the thickness of the alpha case depends on the crystal structure of the alloy during cooling from high temperatures. Furthermore, castings made in small yttria crucibles used as molds exhibited little or no alpha case.
Date: November 1996
Creator: Frueh, C.; Poirier, D. R. & Maguire, M. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rapid prototyping: A paradigm shift in investment casting

Description: The quest for fabricating complex metal parts rapidly and with minimal cost has brought rapid prototyping (RP) processes to the forefront of the investment casting industry. Relatively recent advances in DTM Corporation`s selective laser sintering (SLS) and 3D Systems stereolithography (SL) processes have had a significant impact on the overall quality of patterns produced using these rapid prototyping processes. Sandia National Laboratories uses patterns generated from rapid prototyping processes to reduce the cycle time and cost of fabricating prototype and small lot production parts in support of a program called FASTCAST. The SLS process is used to fabricate patterns from materials such as investment casting wax, polycarbonate, and a new material called TrueForm PM{trademark}. With the timely introduction of each of these materials, the quality of patterns fabricated has improved. The development and implementation of SL QuickCast{trademark} software has enabled this process to produce highly accurate patterns for use in investment casting. This paper focuses on the successes with these new pattern materials and the infrastructure required to cast rapid prototyping patterns successfully. In addition, a brief overview of other applications of rapid prototyping at Sandia will be discussed.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Atwood, C.L.; Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D. & Pardo, B.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fastcast: Integration and application of rapid prototyping and computational simulation to investment casting

Description: The emergence of several rapid prototyping and manufacturing (RP and M) technologies is having a dramatic impact on investment casting. While the most successful of the rapid prototyping technologies are almost a decade old, relatively recent process advances in their application have produced some remarkable success in utilizing their products as patterns for investment castings. Sandia National Laboratories has been developed highly coupled experimental and computational capabilities to examine the investment casting process with the intention of reducing the amount of time required to manufacture castings, and to increase the quality of the finished product. This presentation will begin with process aspects of RP and M pattern production and handling, shell fabrication, burnout, and casting. The emphasis will be on how the use of Stereolithography (SL) or Selective Laser Sintered (SLS) patterns differs from more traditional wax pattern processes. Aspects of computational simulation to couple design, thermal analysis, and mold filling will be discussed. Integration of these topics is probably the greatest challenge to the use of concurrent engineering principles with investment casting. Sandia has conducted several experiments aimed at calibrating computer codes and providing data for input into these simulations. Studies involving materials as diverse as stainless steel and gold have been conducted to determine liquid metal behavior in molds via real time radiography. The application of these experiments to predictive simulations will be described.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D. & Atwood, C.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The effect of microstructure on the thermal fatigue resistance of investment cast and wrought AISI H13 hot work die steel

Description: Variable thickness plate investment castings of AISI H13 hot work die steel were pour and characterized in the as-cast and heat treated conditions. The characterization included light microscopy and mechanical testing. Wrought samples of standard and premium grade H13 steel were heat treated and characterized similarly for comparison. Microstructural differences were observed in as-cast samples poured to different section thicknesses. Dendrite cell size and carbide morphology constituted the most prominent microstructural differences observed. After a full heat treatment, however, Microstructural differences between the wrought material and cast materials were slight regardless of section thickness. The mechanical properties of the cast and heat treated material proved similar to the properties of the standard heat treated wrought material. A thermal fatigue testing unit was designed and built to correlate the heat checking susceptibility of AISI H13 steel to its processing and consequent microstructural condition. Surface hardness decreased significantly with thermal cycling, and heat checking was noticed in as few as 50 cycles. Thermal softening and thermal fatigue susceptibility were quantified and discussed relative to the microstructural conditions created by processing and heat treatment. It was found that the premium grade wrought H13 steel provided the best overall resistance to heat checking; however, the heat-treat cast and as-cast H13 tool steel (made from standard grade wrought H13 tool steel) provided comparable resistance to heat checking in terms Of area fraction of heat checking and maximum crack length.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Hochanadel, P.W.; Edwards, G.R.; Maguire, M.C. & Baldwin, M.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investment cast AISI H13 tooling for automotive applications

Description: While many techniques exist for production of soft tooling, for die casting there is limited recent experience with cast tooling. The most common US alloy used for manufacture of die casting tooling is wrought AISI H13. If the performance of the cast material is comparable to the wrought counterpart, the use of investment cast HI 3 tooling directly from patterns made via rapid prototyping is of considerable interest. A metallurgical study of investment cast H13 was conducted to evaluate the mechanical behavior in simulated die casting applications. Variable thickness plate investment castings of AISI H13 hot work die steel were produced and characterized in the as-cast and heat-treated conditions. The characterization included light microscopy and mechanical testing. Wrought samples of standard and premium grade H13 were heat-treated and characterized similarly for comparison. Microstructural differences were observed in as-cast samples produced in different section thicknesses. Dendrite cell size and carbide morphology constituted the most prominent microstructural differences observed. After a full heat-treatment, microstructural differences between the wrought material and cast materials were slight regardless of section thickness.The mechanical properties of the cast and heat-treated material proved similar to the properties of the standard heat-treated wrought material. A thermal fatigue testing unit was to con-elate the heat checking susceptibility of H13 steel to its processing and consequent microstructural condition. Surface hardness decreased significantly with thermal cycling, and heat checking was observed in as few as 50 cycles. Thermal softening and thermal fatigue susceptibility were quantified and discussed relative to the microstructural conditions created by processing and heat-treatment. It was found that the premium grade wrought H13 steel provided the best overall resistance to heat checking.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D.; Hochanadel, P.W. & Edwards, G.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Production of Gas-Solid Structures in Aluminum and Nickel Alloys by Gasar Processing

Description: Experimental data on directional and bulk solidification of hydrogen-charged samples of aluminum alloy A356 and nickel alloy Inconel 718 are discussed. The solidification structure of the porous zone is shown to be dependent on many process variables. Of these variables, hydrogen content in the melt prior to solidification, and furnace atmospheric pressure during solidification play the decisive role. Also important are the furnace atmosphere composition, the solidification velocity, and the temperature distribution of the liquid metal inside the mold.
Date: January 6, 1999
Creator: Apprill, J.M.; Baldwin, M.D.; Maguire, M.C.; Miszkiel, M.E. & Shapovalov, V.I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Anisotropic porous metals production by melt processing

Description: The collapse of the Soviet Union has left many of its scientific institutes and technical universities without their traditional backbone of financial support. In an effort to stem the export of science to nations advocating nuclear proliferation, and to acquire potentially useful technology, several US government-sponsored programs have arise to mine the best of former USSR scientific advances. In the field of metallurgy, the earliest institutes to be investigated by Sandia National Laboratories are located in Ukraine. In particular, scientists at the State Metallurgical Academy have developed unique porous metals, resembling what could be described as gas-solid ``eutectic``. While porous metals are available in the US and other western countries, none have the remarkable structure and properties of these materials. Sandia began a collaborative program with the Ukrainian scientists to bring this technology to the US, verify the claims regarding these materials, and begin production of the so-called Gasars. This paper will describe the casting process technology and metallurgy associated with the production of Gasars, and will review the progress of the collaborative project.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Shapovalov, V.; Boiko, L.; Baldwin, M.D.; Maguire, M.C. & Zanner, F.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

WinMod: An expert advisor for investment casting

Description: Investment casting is an important method for fabricating a variety of high quality components in mechanical systems. Cast components, unfortunately, have a large design and gate/runner build time associated with their fabrication. In addition, casting engineers often require many years of actual experience in order to consistently pour high quality castings. Since 1989, Sandia National Laboratories has been investigating casting technology and software that will reduce the time overhead involved in producing quality casts. Several companies in the casting industry have teamed up with Sandia to form the FASTCAST Consortium. One result of this research and the formation of the FASTCAST consortium is the creation of the WinMod software, an expert casting advisor that supports the decision making process of the casting engineer through visualization and advice to help eliminate possible casting defects.
Date: April 1, 1998
Creator: Bivens, H.P.; Williamson, G.A. Jr.; Luger, G.F.; Erdmann, R.G.; Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department