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Initial evaluation of photographic data of F- and H-Area seepage basin outcrops

Description: Photographic data for the Savannah River Plant (SRP) were reviewed for 1961 through 1987 to determine the value of this photography in estimating the timing and extent of the F- and H-Area seepage basin outcrops along the upper Four Mile Creek floodplain. In excess of 15,000 frames of photography of the SRP were reviewed. The quality of the photography varied widely and included panchromatic (black and white), natural color, and false color infrared. Altitudes of the photography ranged from 2,000 feet above ground level (AGL) to 40,000 feet AGL. For each year the best photography at the lowest altitude was evaluated to determine the presence of vegetation damage downslope of the F- and H-Area seepage basins. Criteria of no visible evidence of vegetation (forest canopy) damage, initial evidence of vegetation or canopy damage, canopy thinning, tree mortality, and expansion of vegtation damage and/or tree mortality zones were applied to each of the photographs. In this initial evaluation, only the largest of the outcrops below the seepage basins were evaluated. (3 tabs.)
Date: February 8, 1988
Creator: Mackey, H. E., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary assessment of the aquatic impacts of a proposed defense waste processing facility at the Savannah River Plant

Description: A review of the literature indicates that a significant body of descriptive information exists concerning the aquatic ecology of Upper Three Runs Creek and Four Mile Creek of the Savannah River Plant south of Aiken, South Carolina. This information is adequate for preparation of an environmental document evaluating these streams. These streams will be impacted by construction and operation of a proposed Defense Waste Processing Facility for solidification of high level defense waste. Potential impacts include (1) construction runoff, erosion, and siltation, (2) effluents from a chemical and industrial waste treatment facility, and (3) radionuclide releases. In order to better evaluate potential impacts, recommend mitigation methods, and comply with NEPA requirements, additional quantitative biological information should be obtained through implementation of an aquatic baseline program.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Mackey, H.E. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Information Document: L-reactor reactivation

Description: Purpose of this Environmental Information Document is to provide background for assessing environmental impacts associated with the renovation, restartup, and operation of L Reactor at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). SRP is a major US Department of Energy installation for the production of nuclear materials for national defense. The purpose of the restart of L Reactor is to increase the production of nuclear weapons materials, such as plutonium and tritium, to meet projected needs in the nuclear weapons program.
Date: April 1, 1982
Creator: Mackey, H.E. Jr. (comp.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data

Description: Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Mackey, H.E. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Six years of monitoring annual changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data

Description: Fifteen dates of spring-time SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data from spring 1987 through spring 1992 were analyzed to monitor annual changes in a 150-hectare, southeastern floodplain marsh. The marsh underwent rapid changes during the six years from a swamp dominated by non-persistent, thermally tolerant macrophytes to persistent macrophyte and shrub-scrub communities as reactor discharges declined to Pen Branch. Savannah River flooding was also important in the timing of the shift of these wetland communities. SPOT HRV data proved to be an efficient and effective method to monitor trends in these wetland community changes.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Mackey, H.E. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Six years of monitoring annual changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data

Description: Fifteen dates of spring-time SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data from spring 1987 through spring 1992 were analyzed to monitor annual changes in a 150-hectare, southeastern floodplain marsh. The marsh underwent rapid changes during the six years from a swamp dominated by non-persistent, thermally tolerant macrophytes to persistent macrophyte and shrub-scrub communities as reactor discharges declined to Pen Branch. Savannah River flooding was also important in the timing of the shift of these wetland communities. SPOT HRV data proved to be an efficient and effective method to monitor trends in these wetland community changes.
Date: December 1, 1992
Creator: Mackey, H. E. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data

Description: Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.
Date: December 31, 1989
Creator: Mackey, H. E. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A machine learning approach to automated construction of knowledge bases for expert systems for remote sensing image analysis with GIS data

Description: Knowledge-based remote sensing image analysis with GIS data is acknowledged as a promising technique. However, the difficulty in knowledge acquisition, a well-known bottleneck in building knowledge-based systems, impedes the adoption of this technique. Automating knowledge acquisition is therefore in demand. This paper presents a machine learning approach to automated construction of knowledge bases for image analysis expert systems integrating remotely sensed and GIS data. The methodology applied in the study is based on inductive learning techniques in machine learning, a subarea of artificial intelligence. It involves training with examples from remote sensing and GIS data, learning using the inductive principles, decision tree generating, rule generating from the decision tree, and knowledge base building for an image analysis expert system. This method was used to construct a knowledge base for wetland classification of Par Pond on the Savannah River Site, SC, using SPOT image data and GIS data. The preliminary results show that this method can provide an effective approach to integration of remotely sensed and GIS data in geographic information processing.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Huang, X.; Jensen, J.R. & Mackey, H.E. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Par Pond vegetation status Summer 1995 -- Summary

Description: The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the newly emergent, shoreline aquatic plant communities of Par Pond began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level. These surveys continued in July, September, and late October, 1995. Communities similar to the pre-drawdown, Par Pond aquatic plant communities are becoming re-established. Emergent beds of maidencane, lotus, waterlily, and watershield are extensive and well developed. Cattail occurrence continued to increase during the summer, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the drawdown have not formed. Estimates from SPOT HRV, remote sensing satellite data indicated that as much as 120 hectares of emergent wetlands vegetation may have been present along the Par Pond shoreline by early October, 1995. To track the continued development of macrophytes in Par Pond, future surveys throughout 1996 and 1997, along with the continued evaluation of satellite data to map the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond, are planned.
Date: January 1996
Creator: Mackey, H. E., Jr. & Riley, R. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Par Pond vegetation status Summer 1995 -- June survey descriptive summary

Description: The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the shoreline aquatic plant communities in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level, indicated that much of the original plant communities and the intermediate shoreline communities present on the exposed sediments have been lost. The extensive old-field and emergent marsh communities that were present on the exposed shoreline during the drawdown have been flooded and much of the pre-drawdown Par Pond aquatic plant communities have not had sufficient time for re-establishment. The shoreline does, however, have extensive beds of maidencane which extend from the shoreline margin to areas as deep as 2 and perhaps 3 meters. Scattered individual plants of lotus and watershield are common and may indicate likely directions of future wetland development in Par Pond. In addition, within isolated coves, which apparently received ground water seepage and/or stream surface flows during the period of the Par Pond draw down, extensive beds of waterlilies and spike rush are common. Invasion of willow and red maple occurred along the lake shoreline as well. Although not absent from this survey, evidence of the extensive redevelopment of the large cattail and eel grass beds was not observed in this first survey of Par Pond. Future surveys during the growing seasons of 1995, 1996, and 1997 along with the evaluation of satellite date to map the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond are planned.
Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Mackey, H.E. Jr. & Riley, R.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Par Pond vegetation status 1996

Description: The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the newly emergent, shoreline aquatic plant communities of Par Pond began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level. These surveys continued in July, September, and late October, 1995, and into the early spring and late summer of 1996. Communities similar to the pre-drawdown, Par Pond aquatic plant communities continue to become re-established. Emergent beds of maidencane, lotus, waterlily, watershield, and Pontederia are extensive and well developed. Measures of percent cover, width of beds, and estimates of area of coverage with satellite data indicate regrowth within two years of from 40 to 60% of levels prior to the draw down. Cattail occurrence continued to increase during the summer of 1996, especially in the former warm arm of Par Pond, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the draw down still have not formed. Lotus has invaded and occupies many of the areas formerly dominated by cattail beds. To track the continued development of macrophytes in Par Pond, future surveys through the summer and early fall of 1997, along with the evaluation of satellite data to map the extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond, are planned.
Date: December 1, 1996
Creator: Mackey, H.E. Jr. & Riley, R.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Par Pond vegetation status summer 1995 - July survey descriptive summary

Description: A survey of the emergent shoreline aquatic plant, communities began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet (61 meters) above mean sea level, and continued with this July survey. Aquatic plant communities, similar to the pre-drawdown Par Pond communities, are becoming reestablished. Beds of maidencane (Panicum hemitomon), lotus (Nelumbo lutea), water lily (Nymphaea odorata), and watershield (Brasenia schreberi) are now extensive and well established. In addition, within isolated coves, extensive beds of water lilies and spike-rush (Eleocharis sp.) are common. Cattail occurrence has increased since refill, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the drawdown have not formed. Invasion of willow (Salix sp.) and red maple (Acer rubrum) occurred along the lake shoreline during drawdown. The red maples along the present shoreline are beginning to show evidence of stress and mortality from flooding over the past four months. Some of the willows appear to be stressed as well. The loblolly pines (Pinus taeda), which were flooded in all but the shallow shoreline areas, are now dead. Future surveys are planned for the growing seasons of 1995, 1996, and 1997, along with the evaluation of satellite data for mapping the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Mackey, H.E. Jr. & Riley, R.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Par Pond vegetation status Summer 1995 -- September survey descriptive summary

Description: The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the emergent shoreline aquatic plant communities began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level and continued with this mid-September survey. Communities similar to the pre-drawdown Par Pond aquatic plant communities are becoming re-established; especially, beds of maidencane, lotus, waterlily, and watershield are now extensive and well established. Cattail occurrence continues to increase, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the drawdown have not formed. Future surveys during the late growing seasons of 1995, and throughout 1996 and 1997, along with the evaluation of satellite data to map the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond, are planned.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Mackey, H.E. Jr. & Riley, R.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Par Pond vegetation status Summer 1995 -- October survey descriptive summary

Description: The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the emergent shoreline aquatic plant communities began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level and continued with this late October survey. Communities similar to the pre-drawdown Par Pond aquatic plant communities are becoming re-established; especially, beds of maiden cane, lotus, waterlily, and watershield are now extensive and well established. Cattail occurrence continues to increase, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the drawdown have not formed. Future surveys throughout 1996 and 1997, along with the continued evaluation of satellite data to map the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond, are planned.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Mackey, H.E. Jr. & Riley, R.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Detecting changes in wetland morphology using a geographic information system: Historical database application at the Savannah River Site

Description: New policies regarding the ``no net loss`` of wetlands has presented resource managers and GIS analysts with a challenging ecological application. Historical aerial photography provides a temporal record of conditions over time. Access to temporal data sources is beneficial when appraising wetland gain and loss because man-made disturbances can have both short and long term effects on wetland communities. This is particularly true when trying to assess the existing communities for the specific purpose of restoration and reclamation of the ecologic structure and function of the community prior to a disturbance. Remediation efforts can be optimized when definitive documentation exists of the original communities. The Geographic Information System (GIS) is a powerful tool for integrating these data sets and performing spatial and temporal analyses in support of ecological applications.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Christel-Rose, L. M. & Mackey, H. E. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Restoration of Lost Lake, recovery of an impacted Carolina Bay

Description: Lost Lake is one of approximately 200 Carolina bays found on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Until 1984 Lost Lake was contaminated by heavy metals and solvents overflowing from a nearby settling basin. Up to 12 inches of surface soil and all vegetation was removed from the bay as part of a RCRA removal action. A plan for restoration was initiated in 1989 and implemented in 1990 and 1991. Extensive planning led to defined objectives, strategies, treatments, and monitoring programs allowing successful restoration of Lost Lake. The primary goal of the project was to restore the wetland ecosystem after a hazardous waste clean up operation. An additional goal was to study the progress of the project and the success of the restoration activity. Several strategy considerations were necessary in the restoration plan. The removal of existing organic soils had to have compensation, a treatment scheme for planting and the extent of manipulation of the substrate had to be considered, monitoring decisions had to be made, and the decision whether or not to actively control the hydrology of the restored system.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Wike, L.D.; Gladden, J.B.; Mackey, H.E. Jr. & Rogers, V.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integration of geographic information systems and logistic multiple regression for aquatic macrophyte modeling

Description: Since aquatic macrophytes have an important influence on the physical and chemical processes of an ecosystem while simultaneously affecting human activity, it is imperative that they be inventoried and managed wisely. However, mapping wetlands can be a major challenge because they are found in diverse geographic areas ranging from small tributary streams, to shrub or scrub and marsh communities, to open water lacustrian environments. In addition, the type and spatial distribution of wetlands can change dramatically from season to season, especially when nonpersistent species are present. This research, focuses on developing a model for predicting the future growth and distribution of aquatic macrophytes. This model will use a geographic information system (GIS) to analyze some of the biophysical variables that affect aquatic macrophyte growth and distribution. The data will provide scientists information on the future spatial growth and distribution of aquatic macrophytes. This study focuses on the Savannah River Site Par Pond (1,000 ha) and L Lake (400 ha) these are two cooling ponds that have received thermal effluent from nuclear reactor operations. Par Pond was constructed in 1958, and natural invasion of wetland has occurred over its 35-year history, with much of the shoreline having developed extensive beds of persistent and non-persistent aquatic macrophytes.
Date: June 1, 1994
Creator: Narumalani, S.; Jensen, J. R.; Althausen, J. D.; Burkhalter, S. & Mackey, H. E. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Predicting aquatic macrophyte modeling of a new freshwater lake using remote sensing

Description: Par Pond and L Lake are reservoirs on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Beds of aquatic macrophytes (primarily cattail and waterlilies) exist in Par Pond and are now beginning to develop in L Lake. Biophysical knowledge about Par Pond was used to develop `environmental constraint criteria` to predict the future spatial distribution of aquatic macrophytes in L Lake. The L Lake biophysical data were placed in a 5 {times} 5 m raster geographic information system (GIS) and analyzed using Boolean logic. Areas in L Lake which were {le}4 m in depth, {le}10% slope, had a fetch of {le}500 m, and on suitable soil were identified. The final GIS model predicted the spatial distribution of 37.30 ha of aquatic macrophytes which met the environmental constraint criteria (cattails = 12.29 ha and waterlilies = 25.01 ha).
Date: July 1, 1992
Creator: Jensen, J. R.; Narumalani, S.; Weatherbee, O.; Morris, K. S. Jr. & Mackey, H. E. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Incorporating bibliographic information into a spatial data query system for the Savannah River Site

Description: Over the past two years the Environmental Sciences Section of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company and the University of South Carolina have developed a full-featured spatial data query system for the Savannah River Site. This Environmental Data Atlas, which operates across multiple platforms, is designed to provide scientists with easy access to a wide range of GIS and remote sensing data resources. This paper describes the method that has been developed to extend the Environmental Data Atlas to incorporate bibliographical data. The bibliographic search function was determined by the scientists to be an extremely important enhancement that will enable them to utilize geographic keys to locate obscure references and databases. The method uses a Hot Link function to launch a parsing algorithm by pointing to geographic features. The parsing algorithm efficiently sorts through a list of references based on the keyword associated with the feature. The matched bibliographical entries are formatted into a text file that is displayed in a scrollable window. Any graphics associated with the actual reference can also be scanned and linked to an additional Hot Link. An additional parsing system was used to automatically create the bibliographical database from a comprehensive CD-ROM version of the Environmental Information Document prepared by the Environmental Sciences Section. This extensive digital reference represents a summary of much of the recent ecological information available on the site. The methods used in this system are directly linked to a commercially available software and provide a universal approach to establishing a geographically based document retrieval system.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Cowen, D.J.; Jensen, J.R.; MacCharles, C.V.; Holliday, W.N.; White, T.R. & Mackey, H.E. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A summary of ecological investigations at the burial ground complex, Savannah River Site - 1994

Description: This report summarizes the results of three ecological investigations that were conducted in 1994 at the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The three topics of study included remote sensing, aquatic toxicity testing, and qualitative surveys of herpetofauna and small mammals. Interim reports from each investigation are included in the appendices (A, B, and C). The objectives of the remote sensing effort were to compile historical aerial photography of the BGC and to develop a land use/cover map of the complex using recent aerial imagery. The goal of the aquatic toxicity testing was to determine if surface waters were toxic to aquatic biota whereas the objectives of the vertebrate surveys were to identify the species diversity and relative abundances of amphibians, reptiles, and small mammals inhabiting the study area.
Date: November 1, 1994
Creator: Friday, G.P.; Hartman, G.D.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Riley, R.S.; Roach, J.L.; Specht, W.L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Predicting aquatic macrophyte modeling of a new freshwater lake using remote sensing

Description: Par Pond and L Lake are reservoirs on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Beds of aquatic macrophytes (primarily cattail and waterlilies) exist in Par Pond and are now beginning to develop in L Lake. Biophysical knowledge about Par Pond was used to develop environmental constraint criteria' to predict the future spatial distribution of aquatic macrophytes in L Lake. The L Lake biophysical data were placed in a 5 {times} 5 m raster geographic information system (GIS) and analyzed using Boolean logic. Areas in L Lake which were {le}4 m in depth, {le}10% slope, had a fetch of {le}500 m, and on suitable soil were identified. The final GIS model predicted the spatial distribution of 37.30 ha of aquatic macrophytes which met the environmental constraint criteria (cattails = 12.29 ha and waterlilies = 25.01 ha).
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Jensen, J.R.; Narumalani, S.; Weatherbee, O.; Morris, K.S. Jr. (South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Geography) & Mackey, H.E. Jr. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurement of seasonal and yearly aquatic macrophyte changes in a reservoir using multidate aerial photography and SPOT digital remote sensor data

Description: Wetlands assimilate pollutants, provide flood control, and serve as breeding, nursery, and feeding grounds for fish and wildlife. Information on wetland distribution and condition are essential for their effective protection and management. Unfortunately, wetlands present challenges to effective evaluation and quantification. For example, inland wetlands are found in diverse geographic areas ranging from small tributary streams, shrub/scrub and marsh communities, to open water lacustrine environments. In addition, the type and spatial distribution of wetlands can change dramatically between season, especially when non-persistent species are present. There are four alternatives for collecting aquatic macrophyte wetland information, including: (1) in situ field investigation, ideally using global positioning systems, (2) interpreting aerial photography, (3) analyzing high resolution aircraft multispectral scanner (MSS) data and (4) digital analysis of satellite remote sensor data. An earlier study reviewed these alternatives in detail and provided a case study on the use of (a) multidate color and color-infrared aerial photography, and (b) a single year of SPOT remote sensor data. This study builds on the initial work by demonstrating the use of multiple season and multiple year SPOT panchromatic satellite digital data for aquatic macrophyte inventory and analysis in Par Pond on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Jensen, J.R.; Narumalani, S.; Weatherbee, O. (South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Geography) & Mackey, H.E. Jr. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wetlands mapping with spot multispectral scanner data

Description: Government facilities such as the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant (SRP) near Aiken, South Carolina, often use remote sensing data to assist in environmental management. Airborne multispectral scanner (MSS) data have been acquired at SRP since 1981. Various types of remote sensing data have been used to map and characterize wetlands. Regional Landsat MSS and TM satellite data have been used for wetlands mapping by various government agencies and private organizations. Furthermore, SPOT MSS data are becoming available and provide opportunities for increased spacial resolution and temporal coverage for wetlands mapping. This paper summarizes the initial results from using five dates of SPOT MSS data from April through October, 1987, as a means to monitor seasonal wetland changes in freshwater wetlands of the SRP. 11 refs., 4 figs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Mackey, H.E. Jr. (Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (USA)) & Jensen, J.R. (South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (USA). Dept. of Geography)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department