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Uranium Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance of the Bozeman NTMS Quadrangle, Montana

Description: "This report describes work done in the Bozeman, Montana National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) quadrangle (1:250,000 scale) by the Hydrogeochemical and stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR). The HSSR...is designed to identify areas having higher than normal concentrations of uranium in ground waters, surface waters, and water-transported sediments" (p. 1). In this project, 1251 water and 1536 sediment samples were collected from 1586 locations to test for uranium levels.
Date: November 1978
Creator: Bolivar, Stephen L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Uranium Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance of the Albuquerque NTMS Quadrangle, New Mexico, Including Concentrations of Forty-Three Additional Elements

Description: Report of reconnaissance of the Albuquerque NTMS quadrangle through water and sediment samples collected from springs, wells, and streams. Samples analyzed for uranium and 42 other elements. This report is limited to samples containing uranium concentrations greater than the arbitrary anomaly thresholds of 5 parts per billion for waters and 6 parts per million for sediments.
Date: June 1979
Creator: Maassen, Larry W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal Gradient Map of the Conterminous United States

Description: Geothermal gradient map of the United States published by the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Program of the Department of Energy, showing geothermal gradient contours and color-coded based on temperature. The map also contains information about how the information for the map was compiled.
Date: August 1980
Creator: Kron, Andrea
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quantifying reliability uncertainty : a proof of concept.

Description: This paper develops Classical and Bayesian methods for quantifying the uncertainty in reliability for a system of mixed series and parallel components for which both go/no-go and variables data are available. Classical methods focus on uncertainty due to sampling error. Bayesian methods can explore both sampling error and other knowledge-based uncertainties. To date, the reliability community has focused on qualitative statements about uncertainty because there was no consensus on how to quantify them. This paper provides a proof of concept that workable, meaningful quantification methods can be constructed. In addition, the application of the methods demonstrated that the results from the two fundamentally different approaches can be quite comparable. In both approaches, results are sensitive to the details of how one handles components for which no failures have been seen in relatively few tests.
Date: October 1, 2009
Creator: Diegert, Kathleen V.; Dvorack, Michael A.; Ringland, James T.; Mundt, Michael Joseph; Huzurbazar, Aparna (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Lorio, John F. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

International workshop on cold neutron sources

Description: The first meeting devoted to cold neutron sources was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on March 5--8, 1990. Cosponsored by Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories, the meeting was organized as an International Workshop on Cold Neutron Sources and brought together experts in the field of cold-neutron-source design for reactors and spallation sources. Eighty-four people from seven countries attended. Because the meeting was the first of its kind in over forty years, much time was spent acquainting participants with past and planned activities at reactor and spallation facilities worldwide. As a result, the meeting had more of a conference flavor than one of a workshop. The general topics covered at the workshop included: Criteria for cold source design; neutronic predictions and performance; energy deposition and removal; engineering design, fabrication, and operation; material properties; radiation damage; instrumentation; safety; existing cold sources; and future cold sources.
Date: August 1, 1991
Creator: Russell, G. J. & West, C. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conceptual Design Plan SM-43 Replacement Project

Description: The Los Alamos National Laboratory Conceptual Design Plan for the SM-43 Replacement Project outlines plans for replacing the SM-43 Administration Building. Topics include the reasons that replacement is considered a necessity; the roles of the various project sponsors; and descriptions of the proposed site and facilities. Also covered in this proposal is preliminary information on the project schedule, cost estimates, acquisition strategy, risk assessment, NEPA strategy, safety strategy, and safeguards and security. Spreadsheets provide further detail on space requirements, project schedules, and cost estimates.
Date: November 2000
Creator: University of California, Los Alamos National Laboratory, SCC Project Office
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SULFUR POLYMER STABILIZATION/SOLIDIFICATION (SPSS) TREATABILITY OF LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY MERCURY WASTE.

Description: Brookhaven National Laboratory's Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process was used to treat approximately 90kg of elemental mercury mixed waste from Los Alamos National Laboratory. Treatment was carried out in a series of eight batches using a 1 ft{sup 3} pilot-scale mixer, where mercury loading in each batch was 33.3 weight percent. Although leach performance is currently not regulated for amalgamated elemental mercury (Hg) mixed waste, Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP) testing of SPSS treated elemental mercury waste indicates that leachability is readily reduced to below the TCLP limit of 200 ppb (regulatory requirement following treatment by retort for wastes containing > 260 ppb Hg), and with process optimization, to levels less than the stringent Universal Treatment Standard (UTS) limit of 25 ppb that is applied to waste containing < 260 ppm Hg. In addition, mercury-contaminated debris, consisting of primary glass and plastic containers, as well as assorted mercury thermometers, switches, and labware, was first reacted with SPSS components to stabilize the mercury contamination, then macroencapsulated in the molten SPSS product. This treatment was done by vigorous agitation of the sulfur polymer powder and the comminuted debris. Larger plastic and metal containers were reacted to stabilize internal mercury contamination, and then filled with molten sulfur polymer to encapsulate the treated product.
Date: November 1, 2001
Creator: ADAMS,J.W. & KALB,P.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Magnetic interactions in sup 119 Sn substituted for Cu in antiferromagnetic and superconducting lamellar cuprates

Description: Moessbauer Spectroscopy (MS) studies of {sup 119}Sn were carried out in antiferromagnetic La{sub 2}(Cu{sub 0.99}Sn{sub 0.01})O{sub 4} (214) and in superconducting GdBa{sub 2}(Cu{sub 0.99}Sn{sub 0. 01}){sub 3}O{sub 7} (123). Non-magnetic Sn{sup 4+} substitutes for Cu if the right procedure for diffusing {sup 119}SnO{sub 2} in CuO is carried out. Studies performed in 214 show a large quadrupole splitting (QS) down to 120 K followed by an onset of a magnetic interaction reaching a saturation internal field of H{sub eff} = 8.7(5) KOe at T = 30 K. From the combined magnetic-quadrupole interaction the angle {theta} formed by q{sub zz} and H{sub eff}, the {eta}-parameter, and the sign of QS were deduced and information on the local spin structure is derived. Studies conducted with the 123 material (T{sub c} = 90 K) reveal a broad unsplit line at temperatures down to 60 K followed by an abrupt onset of a magnetic interaction corresponding to H{sub eff} (Sn) = 8.3 (7) KOe. The hyperfine field decreases with decreasing temperature reaching 6.0(1) KOe at 16 K. The onset of the magnetic interaction at the {sup 119}Sn nucleus is explained as due to a local depletion of holes following the Sn{sup 4+} doping and a consequent quenching of the magnetic fluctuations in its vicinity. 5 refs., 5 figs.
Date: November 9, 1989
Creator: Pasternak, M. & Taylor, R. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Exploring pulse shaping for Z using graded-density impactors on gas guns (final report for LDRD project 79879).

Description: While isentropic compression experiment (ICE) techniques have proved useful in deducing the high-pressure compressibility of a wide range of materials, they have encountered difficulties where large-volume phase transitions exist. The present study sought to apply graded-density impactor methods for producing isentropic loading to planar impact experiments to selected such problems. Cerium was chosen due to its 20% compression between 0.7 and 1.0 GPa. A model was constructed based on limited earlier dynamic data, and applied to the design of a suite of experiments. A capability for handling this material was installed. Two experiments were executed using shock/reload techniques with available samples, loading initially to near the gamma-alpha transition, then reloading. As well, two graded-density impactor experiments were conducted with alumina. A method for interpreting ICE data was developed and validated; this uses a wavelet construction for the ramp wave and includes corrections for the ''diffraction'' of wavelets by releases or reloads reflected from the sample/window interface. Alternate methods for constructing graded-density impactors are discussed.
Date: October 1, 2005
Creator: Furnish, Michael David; Reinhart, William Dodd; Anderson, William W. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Hixson, Rob (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM) & Kipp, Marlin E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Uranium Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance of the Gallup NTMS Quadrangle, New Mexico/Arizona, Including Concentrations of Forty-Two Additional Elements

Description: This report discusses uranium findings from a reconnaissance of the Gallup NTMS quadrangle through water, sediment, and water samples collected from streams, springs, and wells.
Date: August 1980
Creator: Maassen, Larry W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Surveillance metrics sensitivity study.

Description: In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.
Date: September 1, 2011
Creator: Hamada, Michael S. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Bierbaum, Rene Lynn & Robertson, Alix A. (Lawrence Livermore Laboratory)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A multi-scale Q1/P0 approach to langrangian shock hydrodynamics.

Description: A new multi-scale, stabilized method for Q1/P0 finite element computations of Lagrangian shock hydrodynamics is presented. Instabilities (of hourglass type) are controlled by a stabilizing operator derived using the variational multi-scale analysis paradigm. The resulting stabilizing term takes the form of a pressure correction. With respect to currently implemented hourglass control approaches, the novelty of the method resides in its residual-based character. The stabilizing residual has a definite physical meaning, since it embeds a discrete form of the Clausius-Duhem inequality. Effectively, the proposed stabilization samples and acts to counter the production of entropy due to numerical instabilities. The proposed technique is applicable to materials with no shear strength, for which there exists a caloric equation of state. The stabilization operator is incorporated into a mid-point, predictor/multi-corrector time integration algorithm, which conserves mass, momentum and total energy. Encouraging numerical results in the context of compressible gas dynamics confirm the potential of the method.
Date: March 1, 2006
Creator: Shashkov, Mikhail (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM.); Love, Edward & Scovazzi, Guglielmo
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Long-term corrosion testing plan.

Description: This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing program. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to accommodate all future testing, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2008-4922 to address DOE comments.
Date: February 1, 2009
Creator: Wall, Frederick Douglas & Brown, Neil R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Long-term corrosion testing pan.

Description: This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing needs. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to meet all future testing needs, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2007-7027 to address DOE comments and add a series of tests to address NWTRB recommendations.
Date: August 1, 2008
Creator: Wall, Frederick Douglas & Brown, Neil R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MEMS-based arrays of micro ion traps for quantum simulation scaling.

Description: In this late-start Tier I Seniors Council sponsored LDRD, we have designed, simulated, microfabricated, packaged, and tested ion traps to extend the current quantum simulation capabilities of macro-ion traps to tens of ions in one and two dimensions in monolithically microfabricated micrometer-scaled MEMS-based ion traps. Such traps are being microfabricated and packaged at Sandia's MESA facility in a unique tungsten MEMS process that has already made arrays of millions of micron-sized cylindrical ion traps for mass spectroscopy applications. We define and discuss the motivation for quantum simulation using the trapping of ions, show the results of efforts in designing, simulating, and microfabricating W based MEMS ion traps at Sandia's MESA facility, and describe is some detail our development of a custom based ion trap chip packaging technology that enables the implementation of these devices in quantum physics experiments.
Date: November 1, 2006
Creator: Berkeland, Dana J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Blain, Matthew Glenn & Jokiel, Bernhard, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department