12 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Well descriptions for geothermal drilling

Description: Generic well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. They were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. Their nature, their construction, and their validation are discussed.
Date: January 1, 1981
Creator: Carson, C.C. & Livesay, B.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal drilling technology

Description: The report discusses the current state of geothermal drilling technology with reference to how individual technology items are influenced by the following problem areas: high temperature; lost circulation; abrasive rocks; and corrosive gases. (ACR)
Date: January 1, 1986
Creator: Dunn, J.C. & Livesay, B.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

IM-GEO: Impact of R and D on cost of geothermal power: Documentation of Model Version 2. 09

Description: IM-GEO is an analysis used to estimate the impact of technology improvements on the relative cost of hydrothermal power. The analysis is available in a tutorial program for use on personal computers. It is designed for use by R and D program managers to evaluate R and D options. Only the potential impact of technologies is considered with all economic factors being held constant. This analysis has one unique feature. The economic impact of reducing risk by improving reservoir characterization is included using a strategy currently employed by financial institutions. This report describes the basis of the calculations, documents the code, and describes the operational procedures. Application of the code to study potential cost reductions due to R and D success will be done by R and D managers to evaluate and direct their own programs.
Date: February 1, 1988
Creator: Petty, S.; Entingh, D. & Livesay, B.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced drilling systems study

Description: This work was initiated as part of the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies (NADET) Program. It is being performed through joint finding from the Department of Energy Geothermal Division and the Natural Gas Technology Branch, Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Interest in advanced drilling systems is high. The Geothermal Division of the Department of Energy has initiated a multi-year effort in the development of advanced drilling systems; the National Research Council completed a study of drilling and excavation technologies last year; and the MIT Energy Laboratory recently submitted a proposal for a national initiative in advanced drilling and excavation research. The primary reasons for this interest are financial. Worldwide expenditures on oil and gas drilling approach $75 billion per year. Also, drilling and well completion account for 25% to 50% of the cost of producing electricity from geothermal energy. There is incentive to search for methods to reduce the cost of drilling. Work on ideas to improve or replace rotary drilling technology dates back at least to the 1930`s. There was a significant amount of work in this area in the 1960`s and 1970`s; and there has been some continued effort through the 1980`s. Undoubtedly there are concepts for advanced drilling systems that have yet to be studied; however, it is almost certain that new efforts to initiate work on advanced drilling systems will build on an idea or a variation of an idea that has already been investigated. Therefore, a review of previous efforts coupled with a characterization of viable advanced drilling systems and the current state of technology as it applies to those systems provide the basis for the current study of advanced drilling.
Date: March 1995
Creator: Pierce, K. G. & Livesay, B. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Representative well models for eight geothermal-resource areas

Description: Representative well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal-resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. The models were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. The nature, construction, and validation of the models are presented.
Date: February 1, 1983
Creator: Carson, C.C.; Lin, Y.T. & Livesay, B.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Drilling operations plan for the Magma Energy Exploratory Well

Description: This paper is a summary of the proposed drilling plan for the first phase (to 2500 feet depth) of the Magma Energy Exploratory Well. The drilling program comprises four phases, spaced approximately one year apart, which culminate in a large-diameter well to a total depth near 20,000 feet. Included here are descriptions of the well design, predictions of potential drilling problems, a list of restrictions imposed by regulatory agencies, an outline of Sandia's management structure, and an explanation of how the magma energy technology will benefit from this drilling. 3 figs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Finger, J.T.; Livesay, B.J. & Ash, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal high temperature instrumentation applications

Description: A quick look at the geothermal industry shows a small industry producing about $1 billion in electric sales annually. The industry is becoming older and in need of new innovative solutions to instrumentation problems. A quick look at problem areas is given along with basic instrumentation requirements. The focus of instrumentation is on high temperature electronics.
Date: June 11, 1998
Creator: Normann, R.A. & Livesay, B.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A simple tool to assess the cost-effectiveness of new bit technology

Description: Cost or performance targets for new bit technologies can be established with the aid of a drilling cost model. In this paper the authors make simplifying assumptions in a detailed drilling cost model that reduce the comparison of two technologies to a linear function of relative cost and performance parameters. This simple model, or analysis tool, is not intended to provide absolute well cost but is intended to compare the relative costs of different methods or technologies to accomplish the same drilling task. Comparing the simplified model to the detailed well cost model shows that the simple linear cost model provides a very efficient tool for screening certain new drilling methods, techniques, and technologies based on economic value. This tool can be used to divide the space defined by the set of parameters: bit cost, bit life, rate of penetration, and operational cost into two areas with a linear boundary. The set of all the operating points in one area will result in an economic advantage in drilling the well with the new technology, while any set of operating points in the other area indicates that any economic advantage is either questionable or does not exist. In addition, examining the model results can develop insights into the economics associated with bit performance, life, and cost. This paper includes development of the model, examples of employing the model to develop should cost or should perform goals for new bit technologies, a discussion of the economic insights in terms of bit cost and performance, and an illustration of the consequences when the basic assumptions are violated.
Date: July 1, 1998
Creator: Bomber, T.M.; Pierce, K.G. & Livesay, B.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced drilling systems

Description: Drilling is ubiquitous in oil, gas, geothermal, minerals, water well, and mining industries. Drilling and well completion account for 25% to 50% of the cost of producing power from geothermal energy. Reduced drilling costs will reduce the cost of electricity produced from geothermal resources. Undoubtedly, there are concepts for advanced drilling systems that have yet to be studied. However, the breadth and depth of previous efforts in this area almost guarantee that any new efforts will at least initially build on an idea or a variation of an idea that has already been investigated. Therefore, a review of previous efforts, coupled with a characterization of viable advanced drilling systems and the current state of technology as it applies to those systems, provide the basis for this study.
Date: December 1995
Creator: Pierce, K. G.; Finger, J. T. & Livesay, B. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Well cost estimates in various geothermal regions

Description: A project to estimate well costs in regions of current geothermal activity has been initiated. Costs associated with commonly encountered drilling problems will be included. Activity-based costing techniques will be employed to allow the identification of cost drivers and the evaluation of the economic effects of new technologies and operational procedures on well costs. The sensitivity of well costs to a number of parameters such as rate-of-penetration and daily operating costs will be examined. Additional sensitivity analyses and trade-off studies will evaluate the efficiency of various operational practices and preventive, as well as remedial, actions. These efforts should help provide an understanding of the consumption of resources in geothermal drilling.
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Pierce, K.G.; Bomber, T.M. & Livesay, B.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An estimate of the cost of electricity production from hot-dry rock

Description: This paper gives an estimate of the cost to produce electricity from hot-dry rock (HDR). Employment of the energy in HDR for the production of electricity requires drilling multiple wells from the surface to the hot rock, connecting the wells through hydraulic fracturing, and then circulating water through the fracture system to extract heat from the rock. The basic HDR system modeled in this paper consists of an injection well, two production wells, the fracture system (or HDR reservoir), and a binary power plant. Water is pumped into the reservoir through the injection well where it is heated and then recovered through the production wells. Upon recovery, the hot water is pumped through a heat exchanger transferring heat to the binary, or working, fluid in the power plant. The power plant is a net 5.1-MW[sub e] binary plant employing dry cooling. Make-up water is supplied by a local well. In this paper, the cost of producing electricity with the basic system is estimated as the sum of the costs of the individual parts. The effects on cost of variations to certain assumptions, as well as the sensitivity of costs to different aspects of the basic system, are also investigated.
Date: January 1, 1993
Creator: Pierce, K.G. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)) & Livesay, B.J. (Livesay Consultants, Inc., Encinitas, CA (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supply of geothermal power from hydrothermal sources: A study of the cost of power in 20 and 40 years

Description: This study develops estimates for the amount of hydrothermal geothermal power that could be on line in 20 and 40 years. This study was intended to represent a snapshot'' in 20 and 40 years of the hydrothermal energy available for electric power production should a market exist for this power. This does not represent the total or maximum amount of hydrothermal power, but is instead an attempt to estimate the rate at which power could be on line constrained by the exploration, development and support infrastructure available to the geothermal industry, but not constrained by the potential market for power.
Date: November 1, 1992
Creator: Petty, S. (Petty (Susan) Consulting, Solano Beach, CA (United States)); Livesay, B.J. (Livesay Consultants, Inc., Encinitas, CA (United States)); Long, W.P. (Carlin Gold Co., Inc., Grass Valley, CA (United States)) & Geyer, J. (Geyer (John) and Associates, Vancouver, WA (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department