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ANIMAL code

Description: This report describes ANIMAL, a two-dimensional Eulerian magnetohydrodynamic computer code. ANIMAL's physical model also appears. Formulated are temporal and spatial finite-difference equations in a manner that facilitates implementation of the algorithm. Outlined are the functions of the algorithm's FORTRAN subroutines and variables.
Date: February 28, 1979
Creator: Lindemuth, I.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solid fiber Z-pinches: ''Cold-start'' computations

Description: One- and two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic computations have been performed to study the behavior of solid deuterium fiber Z-pinch experiments performed at Los Alamos and the Naval Research Laboratory. The computations use a tabulated atomic data base and ''cold-start'' initial conditions. The computations predict that the solid fiber persists longer in existing experiments than previously expected and that the discharge actually consists of a relatively low-density, hot plasma which has been ablated from the fiber. The computations exhibit m = 0 behavior in the hot, exterior plasma prior to complete ablation of the solid fiber. The m = 0 behavior enhances the fiber ablation rate. 10 refs., 5 figs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Lindemuth, I.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The role of Z-pinches and related configurations in magnetized target fusion

Description: The use of a magnetic field within a fusion target is now known as Magnetized Target Fusion in the US and as MAGO (Magnitnoye Obzhatiye, or magnetic compression) in Russia. In contrast to direct, hydrodynamic compression of initially ambient-temperature fuel (e.g., ICF), MTF involves two steps: (a) formation of a warm, magnetized, wall-confined plasma of intermediate density within a fusion target prior to implosion; (b) subsequent quasi-adiabatic compression and heating of the plasma by imploding the confining wall, or pusher. In many ways, MTF can be considered a marriage between the more mature MFE and ICF approaches, and this marriage potentially eliminates some of the hurdles encountered in the other approaches. When compared to ICF, MTF requires lower implosion velocity, lower initial density, significantly lower radial convergence, and larger targets, all of which lead to substantially reduced driver intensity, power, and symmetry requirements. When compared to MFE, MTF does not require a vacuum separating the plasma from the wall, and, in fact, complete magnetic confinement, even if possible, may not be desirable. The higher density of MTF and much shorter confinement times should make magnetized plasma formation a much less difficult step than in MFE. The substantially lower driver requirements and implosion velocity of MTF make z-pinch magnetically driven liners, magnetically imploded by existing modern pulsed power electrical current sources, a leading candidate for the target pusher of an MTF system.
Date: July 10, 1997
Creator: Lindemuth, I.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Exploding metallic foils and fuses: A computational modeling update

Description: The Los Alamos computational model of exploding metallic foil behavior has been used to analyze and design a wide range of experiments in which exploding metallic foils were driven by the output current of capacitor banks and magnetic flux compression generators. Currents in the experiments ranged from 1 kA-16 MA and foil conduction times ranged from 200 ns-300 ..mu..s. The successes and limitations of the computational models are surveyed. 18 refs., 6 figs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Lindemuth, I.R. & Reinovsky, R.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Magnetic compression/magnetized target fusion (MAGO/MTF), an update

Description: Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) was reported in two papers at the First Symposium on Current Trends in International Fusion Research. MTF is intermediate between two very different mainline approaches to fusion: Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). The only US MTF experiments in which a target plasma was compressed were the Sandia National Laboratory ``Phi targets``. Despite the very interesting results from that series of experiments, the research was not pursued, and other embodiments of MTF concept such as the Fast Liner were unable to attract the financial support needed for a firm proof of principle. A mapping of the parameter space for MTF showed the significant features of this approach. The All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) has an on-going interest in this approach to thermonuclear fusion, and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and VNIIEF have done joint target plasma generation experiments relevant to MTF referred to as MAGO (transliteration of the Russian acronym for magnetic compression). The MAGO II experiment appears to have achieved on the order of 200 eV and over 100 KG, so that adiabatic compression with a relatively small convergence could bring the plasma to fusion temperatures. In addition, there are other experiments being pursued for target plasma generation and proof of principle. This paper summarizes the previous reports on MTF and MAGO and presents the progress that has been made over the past three years in creating a target plasma that is suitable for compression to provide a scientific proof of principle experiment for MAGO/MTF.
Date: March 1, 1998
Creator: Kirkpatrick, R.C. & Lindemuth, I.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling of high-explosive driven plasma compression opening switches

Description: The initial path of the current through a plasma compression switch is through a thin (500-nm thick) metal foil. The current explodes the foil to form the seed for the conducting plasma. The behavior of the foil at this point is the same as an exploding metal fuse for which we have a simple model. We have, therefore, chosen this model as our starting point. The fuse model assumes that the foil material is homogeneous and is characterized by a single temperature and density. The thickness of the foil is assumed to be much less than the magnetic diffusion skin depth so that the magnetic field varies linearly across the foil. For the present application we assume that the side of the foil away from the channel is fixed in space while the side by the channel is untamped. The foil/plasma will, therefore, cross the channel at the expansion velocity as the foil explodes. Equations for the electrical resistance of the foil, the magnetic fields, the motion of the foil, and the kinetic and internal energies are all solved selfconsistantly. The electrical resistivity, the pressure, and the specific energy of aluminium are taken from the Los Alamos SESAME EOS library. In the case of aluminum we have created a SESAME-style table based on the theory of More and Lee which we have modified to agree with experiment where possible.
Date: January 1, 1986
Creator: Greene, A.E.; Lindemuth, I.R. & Goforth, J.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The promise of magnetized fuel: High gain in inertial confinement fusion

Description: At the third International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems, we presented computational results which suggested that breakeven'' experiments in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) may be possible with existing driver technology. Our computations used a simple zero-dimensional model to survey the parameter space available for magnetized fuel. The survey predicted the existence of a totally new region in parameter space where significant thermonuclear fuel burn-up can occur. The new region is quite remote from conventional'' parameter space and is characterized by very low fuel densities, very low implosion velocities, and, most importantly, driver requirements reduced by orders of magnitude. Whereas our initial computations considered only the yield from a hot, magnetized central fuel, we have extended our simple model to include a cold fuel'' layer. In the same spirit as our earlier work, our extended model is intended to provide a starting point for more comprehensive investigations. Our extended model predicts that it is possible to obtain a large cold fuel burn-up fraction, leading to very high gain, and once again, the optimum parameter space is quite remote from that of conventional high gain targets. Although conventional drivers optimized for conventional targets are probably not optimum for magnetized fuel at its extremes, there is a continuum between the conventional parameter space between the conventional parameter space and the new parameter space, suggesting a possible role for conventional drivers. However, it would appear that magnetized fuel warrants a complete rethinking of the entire driver/target configuration.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Lindemuth, I.R. & Kirkpatrick, R.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ignition and burn in inertially confined magnetized fuel

Description: At the third International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems, we presented computational results which suggested that breakeven'' experiments in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) may be possible with existing driver technology. We recently used the ICF simulation code LASNEX to calculate the performance of an idealized magnetized fuel target. The parameter space in which magnetized fuel operates is remote from that of both conventional'' ICF and magnetic confinement fusion devices. In particular, the plasma has a very high {beta} and is wall confined, not magnetically confined. The role of the field is to reduce the electron thermal conductivity and to partially trap the DT alphas. The plasma is contained in a pusher which is imploded to compress and adiabatically heat the plasma from an initial condition of preheat and pre-magnetization to the conditions necessary for fusion ignition. The initial density must be quite low by ICF standards in order to insure that the electron thermal conductivity is suppressed and to minimize the generation of radiation from the plasma. Because the energy loss terms are effectively suppressed, the implosion may proceed at a relatively slow rate of about 1 to 3 cm/{mu}s. Also, the need for low density fuel dictates a much larger target, so that magnetized fuel can use drivers with much lower power and power density. Therefore, magnetized fuel allows the use of efficient drivers that are not suitable for laser or particle beam fusion due to insufficient focus or too long pulse length. The ignition and burn of magnetized fuel involves very different dominant physical processes than does conventional'' ICF. The fusion time scale becomes comparable to the hydrodynamic time scale, but other processes that limit the burn in unmagnetized fuel are of no consequence. The idealized low gain magnetized fuel target presented here is large and requires ...
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Kirkpatrick, R.C. & Lindemuth, I.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Exploding metallic foil fuse modeling at Los Alamos

Description: A ''first-principles'' computational model of exploding metallic foil behavior has been developed at Los Alamos. The model couples zero-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics with ohmic heating and electrical circuit equations and uses the Los Alamos SESAME atomic data base computer library to determine the foil material's temperature- and density-dependent pressure, specific energy, and electrical conductivity. The model encompasses many previously successful empirical models and offers plausible physical explanations of phenomena not treated by the empirical models. In addition to addressing the electrical circuit performance of an exploding foil, the model provides information on the temporal evolution of the foil material's density, temperature, pressure, electrical conductivity, and expansion and translational velocities. In this paper, we report the physical insight gained by computational studies of two opening switch concepts being developed for application in an FCG-driven 1-MJ-class imploding plasma z-pinch experiment. The first concept considered is a ''conventional'' electrically exploded fuse, which has been demonstrated to operate at 16 MA driven by the 15-MJ-class FCG to be used in the 1 MJ implosion experiment. The second concept considered is a Type 2 explosively formed fuse (EFF), which has been demonstrated to operate at the 8 MA level by a 1-MJ-class FCG.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Lindemuth, I.R.; Reinovsky, R.E. & Goforth, J.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High voltage power condition systems powered by flux compression generators

Description: Compact, high-gain magnetic flux compressors (FCGs) are convenient sources of substantial energy for plasma-physics and electron-beam-physics experiments, but the need for high-voltage, fast-rising pulses is difficult to meet directly with conventional generators. While a variety of novel concepts employing simultaneous, axially- detonated explosive systems are under development, power-conditioning systems based on fuse opening switches and high-voltage transformers constitute another approach that complements the fundamental size, weight, and configuration of the small helical flux compressor. In this paper, we consider first a basic inductive store/opening switch circuit and the implications associated with, specifically, a fuse opening switch and an FCG energy source. We develop a general solution to a transformer/opening switch circuit---which also includes (as a special case) the direct inductive store/opening switch circuit (without transformer) and we report results of one elementary experiment demonstrating the feasibility of the approach. 9 figs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Reinovsky, R.E.; Lindemuth, I.R. & Vorthman, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Computational modeling of magentically driven liner-on-plasma fusion experiments

Description: Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is an approach to controlled fusion which potentially avoids the difficulties of the traditional magnetic and inertial confinement approaches. It appears possible to investigate the critical issues for MTF at low cost, relative to traditional fusion programs, utilizing pulsed power drivers much less expensive than ICF drivers, and plasma configurations much less expensive than those needed for full magnetic confinement. Computational and experimental research into MTF is proceeding at Los Alamos, VNIIEF, and other laboratories.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Sheehey, P.T.; Faehl, R.J.; Kirkpatrick, R.C. & Lindemuth, I.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Megagauss technology and pulsed power applications

Description: This is the final report of a 3-year LDRD project at LANL. Because of recent changes in Russia, there are opportunities to acquire and evaluate technologies for ultrahigh-magnetic-field flux compressors and ultrahigh-energy, ultrahigh-current pulsed-power generators that could provide inexpensive access to various extreme matter conditions and high-energy-density physics regimes. Systems developed by the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) at Arzamas-16 (Sarova) have the potential of creating new thrusts in several areas of high-magnetic-field and high-energy-density R&D, including high-field and high-temperature superconductivity, Faraday effect, cyclotron resonance, isentropic compression, magneto-optical properties, plasma physics, astrophysics, energy research, etc. Through a formal collaboration supported and encouraged by high-ranking DOE officials and senior laboratory management, we have gained access to unique Russian technology, which substantially exceeds US capabilities in several areas, at a small fraction of the cost which would be incurred in an intensive and lengthy US development program.
Date: September 1996
Creator: Lindemuth, I. R.; Reinovsky, R. E. & Fowler, C. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The plasma formation stage in magnetic compression/magnetized target fusion (MAGO/MTF)

Description: In early 1992, emerging governmental policy in the US and Russia began to encourage ``lab-to-lab`` interactions between the All- Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). As nuclear weapons stockpiles and design activities were being reduced, highly qualified scientists become for fundamental scientific research of interest to both nations. VNIIEF and LANL found a common interest in the technology and applications of magnetic flux compression, the technique for converting the chemical energy released by high-explosives into intense electrical pulses and intensely concentrated magnetic energy. Motivated originally to evaluate any possible defense applications of flux compression technology, the two teams worked independently for many years, essentially unaware of the others` accomplishments. But, an early US publication stimulated Soviet work, and the Soviets followed with a report of the achievement of 25 MG. During the cold war, a series of conferences on Megagauss Magnetic Field Generation and Related Topics became a forum for scientific exchange of ideas and accomplishments. Because of relationships established at the Megagauss conferences, VNIIEF and LANL were able to respond quickly to the initiatives of their respective governments. In late 1992, following the Megagauss VI conference, the two institutions agreed to combine resources to perform a series of experiments that essentially could not be performed by each institution independently. Beginning in September, 1993, the two institutions have performed eleven joint experimental campaigns, either at VNIIEF or at LANL. Megagauss- VII has become the first of the series to include papers with joint US and Russian authorship. In this paper, we review the joint LANL/VNIIEF experimental work that has relevance to a relatively unexplored approach to controlled thermonuclear fusion.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Lindemuth, I.R.; Reinovsky, R.E. & Chrien, R.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

On the use of intense ion beams for generating magnetized target fusion plasma

Description: Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is a concept for creating a burning D-T plasma in a potentially inexpensive system. In essence, the concept involves ion heating on time scales short compared to ion transport times plus strong inhibition of thermal electron transport with a transverse magnetic field. The magnetic field is not intended to confine the ionic component. MTF is an intrinsically pulsed concept. A straightforward analysis of MTF indicates that D-T burning conditions can be achieved in compact plasma volumes with modest initial temperatures, through the use of pulsed power technology. In terms of size, density, temperature, and time scales, MTF occupies a position in phase space that is intermediate between steady MFE schemes and ICF. In terms of cost, it is one to two orders of magnitude less expensive than these. In this paper, the authors consider a possible method for creating the initial conditions adequate for the MTF concept through the use intense ion beam injection.
Date: December 1, 1998
Creator: Faehl, R.J.; Wood, B.P.; Lindemuth, I.R. & Sheehey, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Magnetic-compression/magnetized-target fusion (MAGO/MTF): A marriage of inertial and magnetic confinement

Description: Intermediate between magnetic confinement (MFE) and inertial confinement (ICF) in time and density scales is an area of research now known in the US as magnetized target fusion (MTF) and in Russian as MAGO (MAGnitnoye Obzhatiye--magnetic compression). MAGO/MTF uses a magnetic field and preheated, wall-confined plasma fusion fuel within an implodable fusion target. The magnetic field suppresses thermal conduction losses in the fuel during the target implosion and hydrodynamic compression heating process. In contrast to direct, hydrodynamic compression of initially ambient-temperature fuel (i.e., ICF), MAGO/MTF involves two steps: (a) formation of a warm (e.g., 100 eV or higher), magnetized (e.g., 100 kG) plasma within a fusion target prior to implosion; (b) subsequent quasi-adiabatic compression by an imploding pusher, of which a magnetically driven imploding liner is one example. In this paper, the authors present ongoing activities and potential future activities in this relatively unexplored area of controlled thermonuclear fusion.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Lindemuth, I.R.; Ekdahl, C.A. & Kirkpatrick, R.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling of Present and Proposed Magnetized Target Fusion Experiments

Description: In the concept known as Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) in the United States and Magnitnoye Obzhatiye (MAGO) in Russia, a preheated and magnetized target plasma is hydrodynamically compressed to fusion conditions. Because the magnetic field suppresses losses by electron thermal conduction in the fuel during the target implosion heating process, the compression may be over a much longer time scale than in traditional inertial confinement fusion. Hence ''liner-on-plasma'' compressions, magnetically driven using relatively inexpensive electrical pulsed power, may be practical. One candidate target plasma known as ''MAGO'' was originated in Russia and is now being jointly developed by the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Other possible target plasmas now under investigation at LANL include wall-supported deuterium-fiber-initiated Z-pinches and compact toroids. Detailed computational modeling is being done of such target plasmas. In addition, liner-on-plasma compressions of such target plasmas to fusion conditions are being computationally modeled, and experimental and computational investigation of liner implosions suitable for MTF is continuing. Results will be presented.
Date: October 18, 1998
Creator: Sheehey, P.T.; Faehl, R.J.; Kirkpatrick, R.C. & Lindemuth, I.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Future explosive pulse-power technology for high-energy plasma physics experiments

Description: A variety of high-performance pulse-power systems in the 10 to 20-MJ class have been built in the last ten years or are planned in the next 3--5 years. Such systems, using capacitive energy storage, are employed in particle beam fusion, x-ray effects, x-ray physics, and plasma physics experiments. Advances in the technology of high-energy- density capacitors over the same time period has substantially decreased the cost per joule of the basic capacitor and kept the total parts count in large systems within reason. Overall, the savings in capacitor costs has about balanced the generally increasing system costs keeping the total cost of large, high-performance systems at $1--2 per joule over the period. The next step, to 100-MJ class systems, will profit from the improvements of the last decade, but there seems little reason to project a lowering of the cost per joule. In contrast, there is every reason to expect the continuously growing system costs to outstrip any savings to be realized from improvements in capacitor technology. Over the same period, explosive pulse power systems in the 10 to 20-MJ class have been employed, routinely, in plasma physics experiments. These one- shot systems currently cost about $100 K for the generator and switching and deliver energy to a plasma physics experiment in a few microseconds. Comparing only hardware costs, such systems are competitive with capacitor systems for developmental activities involving 100--200 shots -- but not for repetitive applications involving 1000's of shots. At this rate, explosive systems are competitive systems for applications involving up to 200--500 shots. In this paper, we discuss general concepts for generators and power-conditioning systems appropriate for high-energy applications. We scope two such applications and show how explosive pulse power can address those applications. And we describe one example of an explosively powered generator suitable for ...
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Reinovsky, R.E.; Lindemuth, I.R. & Marsh, S.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Two-dimensional behavior of Megagauss-field-confined solid fiber Z-pinches

Description: At Los Alamos, we have performed one-dimensional and two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) computations of the formation and evolution of fiber-formed plasmas. Our one-dimensional computations show that current in the existing Los Alamos and Naval Research Laboratory experiments is carried by hot plasma which has been ablated from the solid fiber. Our two-dimensional computations exhibit m = 0 unstable behavior in the hot, exterior plasma prior to complete ablation of the solid fiber; the m = 0 behavior enhances the fiber ablation rate. The MHD model used in our computations accesses the Los Alamos SESAME tabulated atomic data base computer library to determine material properties. The MHD partial differential equations are solved numerically using an alternating-direction implicit finite difference method which does not resort to fractional time steps, or operator splitting.'' The computations use cold start'' initial conditions in an attempt to compute the behavior of the pinches from t = 0. The two-dimensional computations begin with a 2% random variation superimposed upon the density profile of the solid core to provide perturbations for instability growth. In this paper, the two-dimensional computations are further examined. In the computations reported here, two-different axial lengths, l, are considered, l = 5 mm and l = 300 {mu}m, to study long- and short-wavelength behavior. The long-wavelength computations show the formation and evolution of hot spots in the hot corona surrounding the cold, solid core of the plasma channel; subsequently, hot spots form on the axis of the discharge. The short-wavelength computations exhibit a periodic re-establishment of a quasi-one-dimensional configuration. 5 refs., 5 figs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Lindemuth, I.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ultra-high-density plasma experiments: MHD simulations

Description: High density, laser-initiated, gas-embedded Z-pinch experiments which are being performed at Los Alamos are being treated computationally using a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic computer code. All aspects of the experiment are modeled including the laser-optics system, the Marx-bank/transmission line, electron avalanching, and the experimental diagnostics. Experimental observations have been reproduced very well. The plasma produced in the experiments has n/sub e/>10/sup 20//cm/sup 3/, T=200eV, and n/sub e/tau > 2 x 10/sup 13/ s/cm/sup 3/.
Date: August 1, 1981
Creator: Brownell, J.H.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Oliphant, T.A. & Weiss, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High-performance, high-current fuses for flux compression generator driven inductive store power conditioning applications

Description: Large-scale helical flux compression generators deliver energies in the range of 10--50 MJ in economical, flexible packages for powering a variety of plasma and electron beam experiments. While conventional, end-detonating, helical generators are simple and reliable, they have the disadvantage of delivering their energy over long timescales, up to 400--500 ..mu..s, and at relatively low output voltages. Many experiments require faster risetimes than can be delivered by a helical FCG directly, and inductive systems utilizing high current interrupting switches can be employed to match generator performance to load requirements. For this experiment, a 15-MJ class helical flux compression generator was selected as the primary energy source. This flux compressor is a modification of a design proposed by Pavlovski in 1979 and used routinely in Los Alamos programs. The generator consists of a multiple conductor, multiple pitch, helical stator and a hollow copper armature containing a 60-kg charge of PBX 9501 high explosive (HE) which is initiated by a small plane wave lens at the end opposite the output. 8 refs., 12 figs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Reinovsky, R.E.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Goforth, J.H.; Caird, R.S. & Fowler, C.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High power opening switches for flux compression generator applications: An overview

Description: The high performance explosively powered flux compression generator (FCG) represents a proven source of very large electrical energies, at very high currents, low impedances, and modest powers that is suitable for powering a variety of plasma and beam experiments. Flux compressors have the advantage of delivering energy at low and high current and are ideal for energizing inductive energy storages. They are straightforward, compact, and inexpensive, when evaluated on the basis of cost per joule for a limited number of experiments. Conventional flux compressors have the disadvantage of delivering these enormous energies on relatively long timescales thus making some form of power conditioning essential for powering many interesting loads. Since flux compressors are ideally suited to energizing inductive loads, power conditioning systems based upon inductive store/opening switch techniques are complementary to FCG energy sources. For some experiments, straightforward application of one of a variety of high-current interrupters can provide the needed power conditioning. For more demanding experiments, multi-stage combination of switches may be required. And for loads requiring voltages in excess of a few hundred kilovolts, opening switches coupled with energy storage transformers are suitable. In this paper, we will review switch concepts that have been used in conjunction with flux compressors which deliver energies in the range of 1--20 MJ. These concepts include conventional electrically-exploded fuses, explosively-formed fuses, plasma-dynamic switches, and combinations of these elements. 6 refs., 12 figs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Reinovsky, R.E.; Goforth, J.H.; Lindemuth, I.R. & Oona, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of an MCG/fuse/PFS experiment

Description: The Los Alamos PROCYON high-explosive pulsed power (HEPP) implosion system is intended to produce 1 MJ of soft X-radiation for fusion and material studies. The system uses the MK-IX magnetic flux compression generator to drive a slow'' opening switch which, upon operation, connects the output of the MK-IX generator to a plasma flow switch, which, in turn, delivers current to a rapidly imploding load. The closing switch isolates the plasma flow switch (PFS) and load from any precursor current which might arise due to the finite impedance of the opening switch during its closed phase. In that experiment, our first test, the MK-IX generated approximately 16 MA and 8.2 MJ, and approximately 9.8 MA and 1.15 MJ were delivered to a fixed inductive load in 8--10 microseconds. Computations performed after the experiment, taking into account experimental variables which could not be accurately predicted prior to the experiment, were in satisfactory agreement with all experimental observations, including a double-peaked dI/dt signal which indicated a particular trajectory of the copper fuse material through density-temperature space. Prompted by our success with a fixed load, a second experiment was performed using the MK-IX/fuse/STS combination to drive a plasma flow switch. The objectives of the experiment were to observe the ability of the fuse/STS combination to drive a plasma flow switch and to evaluate our ability to predict system performance. The details of the experiment, the measurements taken, and the data reduction process have previously been reported. The MK-IX produced approximately 22 MA, and approximately 10 MA was delivered to the PFS, which moved down the coaxial barrel of the assembly in an intact manner in about 8 microseconds. In this paper, we present the results of our computational analysis of the experiment.
Date: January 1, 1993
Creator: Lindemuth, I.R.; Rickel, D.G. & Reinovsky, R.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Caballero: A high current flux compressor system for 100 MJ solid liner experiments

Description: Pulse power systems delivering in excess of 100 MJ represent one of the next major challenges to the pulse power community. While a laboratory pulse power system in this energy range if feasible, it represents a very substantial investment of both time and resources. Prudence requires that fundamental proof-of-principle for the contemplated application is established before such massive resources are committed. Explosive pulse power systems using magnetic flux compression provide a direct path to such demonstrations. Furthermore, as energy requirements grow, single use explosive systems may represent the only affordable source of ultra-high energy environments.
Date: November 1, 1997
Creator: Reinovsky, R.E.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Lopez, E.A.; Goforth, J.H. & Marsh, S.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department