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Tensile and stress rupture tests of S8DR Hastelloy-N heats: ORNL verification tests

Description: In connection with the ORR Hastelloy-N irradiation experiments, a limited number of tensile tests and uniaxial and biaxial stress-rupture tests on S8DR Hastelloy-N heats were conducted at AI to determine the effect of some of the ORNL test conditions. The tests performed at AI were in parallel to the ORNL control tests. The results showed that the effect of the test condition variations between the two tests were generally insignificant. The effect of the test conditions is discussed.
Date: October 5, 1967
Creator: Lee, S.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Computational method for thermoviscoelasticity with application to rock mechanics. [Ph. D. Thesis]

Description: Large-scale numerical computations associated with rock mechanics problems have required efficient and economical models for predicting temperature, stress, failure, and deformed structural configuration under various loading conditions. To meet this requirement, the complex dependence of the properties of geological materials on the time and temperature is modified to yield a reduced time scale as a function of time and temperature under the thermorheologically simple material (TSM) postulate. The thermorheologically linear concept is adopted in the finite element formulation by uncoupling thermal and mechanical responses. The thermal responses, based on transient heat conduction or convective-diffusion, are formulated by using the two-point recurrence scheme and the upwinding scheme, respectively. An incremental solution procedure with the implicit time stepping scheme is proposed for the solution of the thermoviscoelastic response. The proposed thermoviscoelastic solution algorithm is based on the uniaxial creep experimental data and the corresponding temperature shift functions, and is intended to minimize computational efforts by allowing large time step size with stable solutions. A thermoelastic fracture formulation is also presented by introducing the degenerate quadratic isoparametric singular element for the thermally-induced line crack problems. The stress intensity factors are computed by use of the displacement method. Efficiency of the presented formulation and solution algorithm is initially demonstrated by comparison with other available solutions for a variety of problems. Subsequent field applications are made to simulate the post-burn and post-repose phases of an underground coal conversion (UCC) experiment and in-situ nuclear waste disposal management problems. 137 references, 48 figures, 6 tables.
Date: January 1, 1984
Creator: Lee, S.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Beam loss due to the aperture limitation resulting from intrabeam scattering

Description: Diffusion equation is used to evaluate the beam loss in the presence of aperture limitation resulting from the intrabeam scattering. We discuss the effect of different boundary conditions. Satisfactory beam intensity can be maintained within the proposed RHIC operation time.
Date: September 12, 1984
Creator: Lee, S.Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A review on the lattice design of large hadron colliders

Description: The conceptual evolution of the accelerator lattice design is discussed. Indicated are aspects of IR design. We emphasize the cancellation of stop-band width in the cluster design. The case of symmetric vs antisymmetric design is also discussed. The SSC lattice is used as an example. 9 refs.
Date: January 1, 1987
Creator: Lee, S.Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dissolution of ion exchange resin by hydrogen peroxide

Description: The resin dissolution process was conducted successfully in full-scale equipment at the SRL Semiworks. A solution containing 0.001M Fe/sup 2 +/, or Fe/sup 3 +/, and 3 vol % H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in 0.1M HNO/sub 3/ is sufficient to dissolve up to 40 vol % resin slurry (Dowex 50W-X8). Foaming and pressurization can be eliminated by maintaining the dissolution temperature below 99/sup 0/C. The recommended dissolution temperature range is 85 to 90/sup 0/C. Premixing hydrogen peroxide with all reactants will not create a safety hazard, but operating with a continual feed of hydrogen peroxide is recommended to control the dissolution rate. An air sparging rate of 1.0 to 1.5 scfm will provide sufficient mixing. Spent resin from chemical separation contains DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) residue, and the resin must be washed with 0.1M NH/sub 4/ OH to remove excess DTPA before dissolution. Gamma irradiation of resin up to 4 kW-hr/L did not change the dissolution rate significantly.
Date: August 1, 1981
Creator: Lee, S.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tangent map analysis of the beam-beam interaction

Description: We studied the tangent map of the beam-beam interaction and found no evidence of beam-beam instability for /epsilon/ = 0.04. Tracking study with tune modulation shows however large emittance growth due to the sum resonances. The emittance growth is due to the multiple crossing of the sum resonances. 12 refs., 7 figs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Lee, S.Y. & Tepikian, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microwave instability near transition energy

Description: Monte Carlo simulation for the microwave instability agrees with analytic calculation solving the Vlasov equation, provided that bunch shape distortion due to coupling is taken into account. 9 refs., 2 figs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Wei, J. & Lee, S.Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chaotic dynamical aperture

Description: Nonlinear magnetic forces become more important for particles in the modern large accelerators. These nonlinear elements are introduced either intentionally to control beam dynamics or by uncontrollable random errors. Equations of motion in the nonlinear Hamiltonian are usually non-integrable. Because of the nonlinear part of the Hamiltonian, the tune diagram of accelerators is a jungle. Nonlinear magnet multipoles are important in keeping the accelerator operation point in the safe quarter of the hostile jungle of resonant tunes. Indeed, all the modern accelerator designs have taken advantages of nonlinear mechanics. On the other hand, the effect of the uncontrollable random multipoles should be evaluated carefully. A powerful method of studying the effect of these nonlinear multipoles is using a particle tracking calculation, where a group of test particles are tracing through these magnetic multipoles in the accelerator hundreds to millions of turns in order to test the dynamical aperture of the machine. These methods are extremely useful in the design of a large accelerator such as SSC, LEP, HERA and RHIC. These calculations unfortunately take a tremendous amount of computing time. In this review the method of determining chaotic orbit and applying the method to nonlinear problems in accelerator physics is discussed. We then discuss the scaling properties and effect of random sextupoles.
Date: January 1, 1985
Creator: Lee, S.Y. & Tepikian, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mutual dressing of bare relativistic heavy ions during transit in collider orbits. I. General considerations

Description: In the interaction regions of a relativistic heavy-ion collider, bare, highly charged nuclei pass at great velocities, oppositely moving similar nuclei. Each nucleus, then, sees strong, time varying electromagnetic fields, and it is not surprising that there is a large probability for electron-positron pair creation (a process evaluated many years ago). There is also a smaller probability that the electron of the pair is created, not in a continuum state, but in one of the bound orbits, the K or L or higher orbits, of the Coulomb field of the previously bare nuclei. This dressing is most unfortunate for a collider device, since the charge change leaves the nucleus in an orbit that is no longer appropriate for continuing circulation. This note evaluates the probability for such dressing, and also examines whether a subsequent sweep-off process can undo the first step with any sizeable likelihood. 3 references.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Lee, S.Y. & Weneser, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Transient Accident Analysis of the Glovebox System in a Large Process Room

Description: Local transient hydrogen concentrations were evaluated inside a large process room when the hydrogen gas was released by three postulated accident scenarios associated with the process tank leakage and fire leading to a loss of gas confinement. The three cases considered in this work were fire in a room, loss of confinement from a process tank, and loss of confinement coupled with fire event. Based on these accident scenarios in a large and unventilated process room, the modeling calculations of the hydrogen migration were performed to estimate local transient concentrations of hydrogen due to the sudden leakage and release from a glovebox system associated with the process tank. The modeling domain represented the major features of the process room including the principal release or leakage source of gas storage system. The model was benchmarked against the literature results for key phenomena such as natural convection, turbulent behavior, gas mixing due to jet entrainment, and radiation cooling because these phenomena are closely related to the gas driving mechanisms within a large air space of the process room. The modeling results showed that at the corner of the process room, the gas concentrations migrated by the Case 2 and Case 3 scenarios reached the set-point value of high activity alarm in about 13 seconds, while the Case 1 scenario takes about 90 seconds to reach the concentration. The modeling results were used to estimate transient radioactive gas migrations in an enclosed process room installed with high activity alarm monitor when the postulated leakage scenarios are initiated without room ventilation.
Date: January 11, 2008
Creator: Lee, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

GROUT HOPPER MODELING STUDY

Description: The Saltstone facility has a grout hopper tank to provide agitator stirring of the Saltstone feed materials. The tank has about 300 gallon capacity to provide a larger working volume for the grout slurry to be held in case of a process upset, and it is equipped with a mechanical agitator, which is intended to keep the grout in motion and agitated so that it won't start to set up. The dry feeds and the salt solution are already mixed in the mixer prior to being transferred to the hopper tank. The hopper modeling study through this work will focus on fluid stirring and agitation, instead of traditional mixing in the literature, in order to keep the tank contents in motion during their residence time so that they will not be upset or solidified prior to transferring the grout to the Saltstone disposal facility. The primary objective of the work is to evaluate the flow performance for mechanical agitators to prevent vortex pull-through for an adequate stirring of the feed materials and to estimate an agitator speed which provides acceptable flow performance with a 45{sup o} pitched four-blade agitator. In addition, the power consumption required for the agitator operation was estimated. The modeling calculations were performed by taking two steps of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling approach. As a first step, a simple single-stage agitator model with 45{sup o} pitched propeller blades was developed for the initial scoping analysis of the flow pattern behaviors for a range of different operating conditions. Based on the initial phase-1 results, the phase-2 model with a two-stage agitator was developed for the final performance evaluations. A series of sensitivity calculations for different designs of agitators and operating conditions have been performed to investigate the impact of key parameters on the grout hydraulic performance ...
Date: August 30, 2011
Creator: Lee, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

TANK48 CFD MODELING ANALYSIS

Description: The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four dual-nozzle slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. For the work, a Tank 48 simulation model with a maximum of four slurry pumps in operation has been developed to estimate flow patterns for efficient solid mixing. The modeling calculations were performed by using two modeling approaches. One approach is a single-phase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to evaluate the flow patterns and qualitative mixing behaviors for a range of different modeling conditions since the model was previously benchmarked against the test results. The other is a two-phase CFD model to estimate solid concentrations in a quantitative way by solving the Eulerian governing equations for the continuous fluid and discrete solid phases over the entire fluid domain of Tank 48. The two-phase results should be considered as the preliminary scoping calculations since the model was not validated against the test results yet. A series of sensitivity calculations for different numbers of pumps and operating conditions has been performed to provide operational guidance for solids suspension and mixing in the tank. In the analysis, the pump was assumed to be stationary. Major solid obstructions including the pump housing, the pump columns, and the 82 inch central support column were included. The steady state and three-dimensional analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed with FLUENT{trademark} for the single-phase approach and CFX for the two-phase approach. Recommended operational guidance was developed assuming that local fluid velocity can be used as a measure of sludge suspension and spatial mixing under single-phase tank model. For quantitative analysis, a two-phase fluid-solid model was developed for the same modeling conditions ...
Date: May 17, 2011
Creator: Lee, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MODELING ANALYSIS FOR GROUT HOPPER WASTE TANK

Description: The Saltstone facility at Savannah River Site (SRS) has a grout hopper tank to provide agitator stirring of the Saltstone feed materials. The tank has about 300 gallon capacity to provide a larger working volume for the grout nuclear waste slurry to be held in case of a process upset, and it is equipped with a mechanical agitator, which is intended to keep the grout in motion and agitated so that it won't start to set up. The primary objective of the work was to evaluate the flow performance for mechanical agitators to prevent vortex pull-through for an adequate stirring of the feed materials and to estimate an agitator speed which provides acceptable flow performance with a 45{sup o} pitched four-blade agitator. In addition, the power consumption required for the agitator operation was estimated. The modeling calculations were performed by taking two steps of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling approach. As a first step, a simple single-stage agitator model with 45{sup o} pitched propeller blades was developed for the initial scoping analysis of the flow pattern behaviors for a range of different operating conditions. Based on the initial phase-1 results, the phase-2 model with a two-stage agitator was developed for the final performance evaluations. A series of sensitivity calculations for different designs of agitators and operating conditions have been performed to investigate the impact of key parameters on the grout hydraulic performance in a 300-gallon hopper tank. For the analysis, viscous shear was modeled by using the Bingham plastic approximation. Steady state analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed. All analyses were based on three-dimensional results. Recommended operational guidance was developed by using the basic concept that local shear rate profiles and flow patterns can be used as a measure of hydraulic performance and spatial stirring. Flow patterns ...
Date: January 4, 2012
Creator: Lee, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MIXING STUDY FOR JT-71/72 TANKS

Description: All modeling calculations for the mixing operations of miscible fluids contained in HBLine tanks, JT-71/72, were performed by taking a three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach. The CFD modeling results were benchmarked against the literature results and the previous SRNL test results to validate the model. Final performance calculations were performed by using the validated model to quantify the mixing time for the HB-Line tanks. The mixing study results for the JT-71/72 tanks show that, for the cases modeled, the mixing time required for blending of the tank contents is no more than 35 minutes, which is well below 2.5 hours of recirculation pump operation. Therefore, the results demonstrate the adequacy of 2.5 hours’ mixing time of the tank contents by one recirculation pump to get well mixed.
Date: November 26, 2013
Creator: Lee, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF CST MEDIA IN THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROJECT

Description: Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. The SCIX design includes CST columns inserted and supported in the tank top risers for cesium removal. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated with a focus on process upset conditions. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. One salt processing scenario includes the transport of the loaded (and possibly ground) CST media to the treatment tank floor. Therefore, additional thermal modeling calculations were conducted using a three-dimensional approach to evaluate temperature distributions for the entire in-tank domain including distribution of the spent CST media either as a mound or a flat layer on the tank floor. These calculations included mixtures of CST with HLW sludge or loaded Monosodium Titanate (MST) media used for strontium/actinide sorption. The current full-scale design for the CST column includes one central cooling pipe and four outer cooling tubes. Most calculations assumed that the fluid within the column was stagnant (i.e. no buoyancy-induced flow) for a conservative estimate. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various ...
Date: November 1, 2010
Creator: Lee, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

BLENDING ANALYSIS FOR RADIOACTIVE SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

Description: Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated methods to mix and blend the contents of the blend tanks to ensure the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank such as Tank 21 and Tank 24 to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The tank contents consist of three forms: dissolved salt solution, other waste salt solutions, and sludge containing settled solids. This paper focuses on developing the computational model and estimating the operation time of submersible slurry pump when the tank contents are adequately blended prior to their transfer to the SWPF facility. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics approach was taken by using the full scale configuration of SRS Type-IV tank, Tank 21H. Major solid obstructions such as the tank wall boundary, the transfer pump column, and three slurry pump housings including one active and two inactive pumps were included in the mixing performance model. Basic flow pattern results predicted by the computational model were benchmarked against the SRNL test results and literature data. Tank 21 is a waste tank that is used to prepare batches of salt feed for SWPF. The salt feed must be a homogeneous solution satisfying the acceptance criterion of the solids entrainment during transfer operation. The work scope described here consists of two modeling areas. They are the steady state flow pattern calculations before the addition of acid solution for tank blending operation and the transient mixing analysis during miscible liquid blending operation. The transient blending calculations were performed by using the 95% homogeneity criterion for the entire liquid domain of the tank. The initial conditions for the entire modeling domain were based on the steady-state flow pattern results with zero second phase concentration. The performance model was also benchmarked against the SRNL test results and literature data.
Date: May 10, 2012
Creator: Lee, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

JET MIXING ANALYSIS FOR SRS HIGH-LEVEL WASTE RECOVERY

Description: The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. The slurry pump may be fixed in position or they may rotate depending on the specific mixing requirements. The high-level waste in Tank 48 contains insoluble solids in the form of potassium tetraphenyl borate compounds (KTPB), monosodium titanate (MST), and sludge. Tank 48 is equipped with 4 slurry pumps, which are intended to suspend the insoluble solids prior to transfer of the waste to the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) process. The FBSR process is being designed for a normal feed of 3.05 wt% insoluble solids. A chemical characterization study has shown the insoluble solids concentration is approximately 3.05 wt% when well-mixed. The project is requesting a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) mixing study from SRNL to determine the solids behavior with 2, 3, and 4 slurry pumps in operation and an estimate of the insoluble solids concentration at the suction of the transfer pump to the FBSR process. The impact of cooling coils is not considered in the current work. The work consists of two principal objectives by taking a CFD approach: (1) To estimate insoluble solids concentration transferred from Tank 48 to the Waste Feed Tank in the FBSR process and (2) To assess the impact of different combinations of four slurry pumps on insoluble solids suspension and mixing in Tank 48. For this work, several different combinations of a maximum of four pumps are considered to determine the resulting flow patterns and local flow velocities which are thought to be associated with sludge particle mixing. Two different elevations of pump nozzles are used for ...
Date: July 5, 2011
Creator: Lee, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

TRANSIENT HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR SRS RADIOACTIVE TANK OPERATION

Description: The primary objective of the present work is to perform a heat balance study for type-I waste tank to assess the impact of using submersible mixer pumps during waste removal. The temperature results calculated by the model will be used to evaluate the temperatures of the slurry waste under various tank operating conditions. A parametric approach was taken to develop a transient model for the heat balance study for type-I waste tanks such as Tank 11, during waste removal by SMP. The tank domain used in the present model consists of two SMP�s for sludge mixing, one STP for the waste removal, cooling coil system with 36 coils, and purge gas system. The sludge waste contained in Tank 11 also has a decay heat load of about 43 W/m{sup 3} mainly due to the emission of radioactive gamma rays. All governing equations were established by an overall energy balance for the tank domain, and they were numerically solved. A transient heat balance model used single waste temperature model, which represents one temperature for the entire waste liquid domain contained in the tank at each transient time.
Date: June 27, 2013
Creator: Lee, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MIXING MODELING ANALYSIS FOR SRS SALT WASTE DISPOSITION

Description: Nuclear waste at Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks consists of three different types of waste forms. They are the lighter salt solutions referred to as supernate, the precipitated salts as salt cake, and heavier fine solids as sludge. The sludge is settled on the tank floor. About half of the residual waste radioactivity is contained in the sludge, which is only about 8 percentage of the total waste volume. Mixing study to be evaluated here for the Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) project focuses on supernate preparations in waste tanks prior to transfer to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The methods to mix and blend the contents of the SRS blend tanks were evalutaed to ensure that the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank such as Tank 50H to the SWPF feed tank. The work consists of two principal objectives to investigate two different pumps. One objective is to identify a suitable pumping arrangement that will adequately blend/mix two miscible liquids to obtain a uniform composition in the tank with a minimum level of sludge solid particulate in suspension. The other is to estimate the elevation in the tank at which the transfer pump inlet should be located where the solid concentration of the entrained fluid remains below the acceptance criterion (0.09 wt% or 1200 mg/liter) during transfer operation to the SWPF. Tank 50H is a Waste Tank that will be used to prepare batches of salt feed for SWPF. The salt feed must be a homogeneous solution satisfying the acceptance criterion of the solids entrainment during transfer operation. The work described here consists of two modeling areas. They are the mixing modeling analysis during miscible liquid blending operation, and the flow pattern analysis during transfer operation of the blended liquid. ...
Date: January 18, 2011
Creator: Lee, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SDI CFD MODELING ANALYSIS

Description: The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Organization requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) develop a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method to mix and blend the miscible contents of the blend tanks to ensure the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank; such as, Tank 50H, to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The work described here consists of two modeling areas. They are the mixing modeling analysis during miscible liquid blending operation, and the flow pattern analysis during transfer operation of the blended liquid. The transient CFD governing equations consisting of three momentum equations, one mass balance, two turbulence transport equations for kinetic energy and dissipation rate, and one species transport were solved by an iterative technique until the species concentrations of tank fluid were in equilibrium. The steady-state flow solutions for the entire tank fluid were used for flow pattern analysis, for velocity scaling analysis, and the initial conditions for transient blending calculations. A series of the modeling calculations were performed to estimate the blending times for various jet flow conditions, and to investigate the impact of the cooling coils on the blending time of the tank contents. The modeling results were benchmarked against the pilot scale test results. All of the flow and mixing models were performed with the nozzles installed at the mid-elevation, and parallel to the tank wall. From the CFD modeling calculations, the main results are summarized as follows: (1) The benchmark analyses for the CFD flow velocity and blending models demonstrate their consistency with Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL) and literature test results in terms of local velocity measurements and experimental observations. Thus, an application of the established criterion to SRS full scale tank will provide a better, physically-based estimate of the required mixing time, and elevation of ...
Date: May 5, 2011
Creator: Lee, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE SOLIDIFICATION CONTAINER

Description: The Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Design Authority is in the design stage of the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for the treatment and solidification of the radioactive liquid waste streams generated by the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The waste streams will be mixed with a cementitious dry mix in a 55-gallon waste container. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been performing the testing and evaluations to support technical decisions for the WSB. Engineering Modeling & Simulation Group was requested to evaluate the thermal performance of the 55-gallon drum containing hydration heat source associated with the current baseline cement waste form. A transient axi-symmetric heat transfer model for the drum partially filled with waste form cement has been developed and heat transfer calculations performed for the baseline design configurations. For this case, 65 percent of the drum volume was assumed to be filled with the waste form, which has transient hydration heat source, as one of the baseline conditions. A series of modeling calculations has been performed using a computational heat transfer approach. The baseline modeling results show that the time to reach the maximum temperature of the 65 percent filled drum is about 32 hours when a 43 C initial cement temperature is assumed to be cooled by natural convection with 27 C external air. In addition, the results computed by the present model were compared with analytical solutions. The modeling results will be benchmarked against the prototypic test results. The verified model will be used for the evaluation of the thermal performance for the WSB drum. Detailed results and the cases considered in the calculations will be discussed here.
Date: June 1, 2009
Creator: Lee, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fiber-optic high voltage isolation of CAMAC highway

Description: Fault analyses of the Doublet III Machine predict that a worst-case 30 kV might accidentally appear on control and data acquisition wiring connected to CAMAC interface systems. Such an accident could cause damage in CAMAC and computer equipment as distant as the control room, with attendant possibility of personal injury to operators and experimenters. Protection for control room personnel and equipment has been provided in the form of fiber-optic data link systems installed in CAMAC parallel branch and byte serial highways. Both fiber-optic data link systems were designed, documented, and fabricated at General Atomic, using vendor-supplied fiber-optic transmitter and receiver modules. (MOW)
Date: November 1, 1979
Creator: Lee, S.T. & Moore, C.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department