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Progress report on pre-test calculations for the large block test

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) is investigating the suitability of the Topopah Spring tuff in the thick vadose zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a host rock for permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. As part of the YMP, a group of field tests, referred to as the Large Block Test (LBT), will be conducted on a large electrically heated block of Topopah Spring tuff, isolated at Fran Ridge, Nevada Test Site. The block, which will be 3 x 3 m in horizontal dimensions and 4.5 m in height, will be heated by electrical heaters. The goals of the LBT axe to gain information on the coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological-chemical processes active in the near-field environment of a repository; to provide field data for testing and calibrating models; and to help the development of measurement systems and techniques. This progress report presents results of on-going numerical modeling calculations carried out in support of the LBT design. An equivalent continuum model with an upper boundary temperature of 60{degrees}C was used to simulate the hydrothermal response of the block to heating over a one-year period. The total heating power was started at 1500 W and later reduced to maintain an approximately uniform temperature of 138-140{degrees}C. For a homogeneous bulk permeability case, the results show the formation of a distinct dry-out zone in and around the heater plane, and well-developed condensation zones above and below the heater plane. For a heterogeneous permeability distribution, the condensation zone above the heater plane was not well developed. This difference in results suggests that water saturation changes might be sensitive to changes in bulk permeability distribution. Rock temperatures were almost unaffected by permeability distribution. Heat flow was dominated by conduction. No liquid flow through the top of the block was predicted.
Date: January 20, 1995
Creator: Lee, K.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Second progress report on pre-test calculations for the large block test

Description: The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) is investigating the suitability of the Topopah Spring tuff in the thick vadose zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a host rock for permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. As part of the YMP, a group of field tests, called the Large Block Test (LBT), will be conducted on a large electrically heated block of Topopah Spring tuff. The block will be heated by electrical heaters. The goals of the LBT are to gain information on the coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological-chemical processes that will be active in the near-field environment of a repository; to provide field data for testing and calibrating models; and to help in the development of measurement systems and techniques. In this second progress report, we present results of the final set of numerical modeling calculations performed in support of the LBT design. The results include block temperatures and heat fluxes across the surfaces. The results are applied primarily to the design of guard heaters to enforce adiabatic conditions along the block walls. Conduction-only runs are adequate to estimate the thermal behavior of the system, because earlier calculations showed that heat transfer in the block is expected to be dominated by conduction. In addition, conduction-only runs can be made at substantially shorter execution times than full hydrothermal runs. We also run a two-dimensional, hydrothermal, discrete fracture model, with 200-{mu}m vertical fractures parallel to the heaters and occurring at a uniform spacing of 30 cm. The results show the development of distinct dryout and recondensation zones. The dryout zones are thickest at the fractures and thinnest in the matrix midway between the fractures.
Date: November 15, 1995
Creator: Lee, K.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of vadose zone tritium transport from an underground storage tank release using numerical modeling and geostatistics

Description: Numerical and geostatistical analyses show that the artificial smoothing effect of kriging removes high permeability flow paths from hydrogeologic data sets, reducing simulated contaminant transport rates in heterogeneous vadose zone systems. therefore, kriging alone is not recommended for estimating the spatial distribution of soil hydraulic properties for contaminant transport analysis at vadose zone sites. Vadose zone transport if modeled more effectively by combining kriging with stochastic simulation to better represent the high degree of spatial variability usually found in the hydraulic properties of field soils. However, kriging is a viable technique for estimating the initial mass distribution of contaminants in the subsurface.
Date: September 1, 1997
Creator: Lee, K.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multifrequency crosshole EM imaging for reservoir characterization. FY 1994 annual report

Description: Electrical conductivity of sedimentary rocks is controlled by the porosity, hydraulic permeability, temperature, saturation, and the pore fluid conductivity. These rock parameters play important roles in the development and production of hydrocarbon (petroleum and natural gas) resources. For these reasons, resistivity well logs have long been used by geologists and reservoir engineers in petroleum industries to map variations in pore fluid, to distinguish between rock types, and to determine completion intervals in wells. Reservoir simulation and process monitoring rely heavily on the physical characteristics of the reservoir model. Over a period of three years (1991-1993) there was an initial phase of crosshole EM technique development via an informal partnership between LLNL and LBL. Researchers developed field instrumentation to apply to oil field for monitoring EOR thermal processes. Specifically, a prototype single-frequency instrumentation was developed and with this system we have conducted field surveys in four separate locations. Theory and software were developed to interpret these data by providing subsurface images of the electrical conductivity. In spite of our initial success in developing practical EM techniques, we still had severe instrumentation limitations and shortcomings in interpretation for other than simple structures. The field equipment was designed to work only at a single frequency at a time and the transmitter must be opened to change frequencies. The equipment was also significantly noiser at higher frequencies. For high-resolution applications we need to take full advantage of the resolution inherent in the data. The development of a high-resolution subsurface conductivity imaging methods would have benefits far beyond the petroleum application. Such techniques would be very useful in environmental applications, mineral and geothermal exploration and for civil engineering applications.
Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Lee, K.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sorption Characteristics of Aqueous Co(II) on Preformed Iron Ferrite Impregnated into Phenolsulphonic Formaldehyde Resin

Description: A series of stepwise procedures to prepare a new organic-inorganic composite magnetic resin with phenolsulphonicformaldehyde and freshly formed iron ferrite was established, based upon wet-and-neutralization method for synthesizing iron ferrite and pearl-polymerization method for synthesizing rigid bead-type composite resin. The composite resin prepared by the above method shows stably high removal efficiency (maximally over 3.1 meq./gresin) to Co(II) species from wastewater in a wide range of solution pH. The wide range of applicable solution pH (i.e. pH 4.09 to 10.32) implies that the composite resin overcomes the limitations of the conventional ferrite process that is practically applicable only to alkaline conditions. It has been found that both ion exchange (by the organic resin constituent) and surface adsorption (by the inorganic adsorbent constituent) are major reaction mechanisms for removing Co(II) from wastewater, but surface precipitation results in the high sorption capacity to Co(II) beyond normal ion exchange capacity of the phenolsulphonic-formaldehyde resin. Standard enthalpy change derived from van't Hoff equation is 32.0 kJ{center_dot}mol-1 conforming to the typical range for chemisorption or ion exchange. In a wide range of equilibrium Co(II) concentration, the overall isotherm is qualitatively explained by the generalized adsorption isotherm concept proposed by McKinley. At the experimental conditions where the composite resin shows equivalent selectivity to Co(II) and other competing reagents (i.e. EDTA and Na), the ratios of Co(II) to other chemicals turn out to be 2:1 and 1:221, respectively. In addition, the selectivity of the PSF-F to Co(II) species is very high (about 72% of Co(II)-removal efficiency) even when the molar ratio of Co(II) to Ca(II) is 1:30. It is anticipated that the composite resin can also be used for column-operation with process-control by applying external magnetic field, since the rigid bead-type composite resin shows magnetic-susceptibility due to its paramagnetic inorganic constituent (i.e. iron ferrite).
Date: February 26, 2002
Creator: Lee, K. J. & Kim, Y. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Classification of Geothermal Resources - An engineering approach

Description: Geothermal resources have been classified into low, intermediate and high enthalpy resources by their reservoir temperatures. The temperature ranges used are arbitrary and there is not a general agreement. Geothermal resources should be classified by two independent thermodynamic properties of their fluids at the wellhead. They should reflect the fluids availability to do work. By setting the triple point of water as the sink condition, and normalising the fluids specific exergies by the maximum specific exergy of dry saturated steam, geothermal resources can be classified into high, medium, and low category resources by their specific exergy indices (SEI) of greater than 0.5, between 0.05 and 0.5, and less than 0.05. These correspond to geothermal fluids having exergies greater than that of dry saturated steam at 1 bar absolute, between saturated water and dry saturated steam at 1 bar absolute, and less than saturated water at 1 bar absolute respectively.
Date: January 24, 1996
Creator: Lee, K.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Field air injection tests to determine the effect of a heat cycle on the permeability of welded tuff

Description: As part of a series of prototype tests conducted in preparation for site characterization at Yucca Mountain, air-injection tests were conducted in the welded tuffs in G-Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site. The objectives were to characterize the permeability of the highly fractured tuff around a horizontal heater emplacement borehole, and to determine the effect of a heating and cooling cycle on the rock-mass permeability. Air was injected into packed-off intervals along the heater borehole. The bulk permeability of the rock adjacent to the test interval was computed from the air-flow rate, temperature, and pressure at steady state. The permeability varied from a minimum of 0.08 D to a maximum of over 144 D. Higher permeabilities seemed to correlate spatially with the mapped fractures. The rock was then heated for a period of 6.5 months with an electrical-resistive heater installed in the borehole. After heating, the rock was allowed to cool down to the ambient temperature. the highest borehole wall temperature measured was 242{degrees}C. Air injection tests were repeated following the heating and cooling cycle, and the results showed significant increases in bulk permeability ranging from 10 to 1830% along the borehole.
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Lee, K.H. & Ueng, Tzou-Shin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Air-injection field tests to determine the effect of a heat cycle on the permeability of welded tuff

Description: As part of a series of prototype tests conducted in preparation for site characterization of the potential nuclear-waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, air-injection tests were conducted in the welded tuffs in G-Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site. The objectives were to characterize the permeability of the highly fractured tuff around a horizontal heater emplacement borehole, and to determine the effect of a heating and cooling cycle on the rock-mass permeability. Air was injected into packed-off intervals along the heater borehole. The bulk permeability of the rock adjacent to the test interval and the aperture of fractures intersecting the interval were computed from the air-flow rate, temperature, and pressure at steady state. The bulk permeability of intervals along with borehole varied from a minimum of 0.08 D to a maximum of over 144 D and the equivalent parallel-plate apertures of fractures intersecting the borehole varied from 70 to 589 {mu}m. Higher permeabilities seemed to correlate spatially with the mapped fractures. The rock was then heated for a period of 6.5 months with an electrical-resistive heater installed in the borehole. After heating, the rock was allowed to cool down to the ambient temperature. The highest borehole wall temperature measured was 242{degree}C. Air injection tests were repeated following the heating and cooling cycle, and the results showed significant increases in bulk permeability ranging from 10 to 1830% along the borehole. 8 ref., 6 figs., 3 tabs.
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Lee, K.H. & Ueng, Tzou-Shin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Study on the Tritium Behavior in the Rice Plant after a Short-Term Exposure of HTO

Description: In many Asian countries including Korea, rice is a very important food crop. Its grain is consumed by humans and its straw is used to feed animals. In Korea, there are four CANDU type reactors that release relatively large amounts of tritium into the environment. Since 1997, KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) has carried out the experimental studies to obtain domestic data on various parameters concerning the direct contamination of plant. In this study, the behavior of tritium in the rice plant is predicted and compared with the measurement performed at KAERI. Using the conceptual model of the soil-plant-atmosphere tritiated water transport system which was suggested by Charles E. Murphy, tritium concentrations in the soil and in leaves to time were derived. If the effect of tritium concentration in the soil is considered, the tritium concentration in leaves is described as a double exponential model. On the other hand if the tritium concentration in the soil is disregarded, the tritium concentration in leaves is described by a single exponential term as other models (e.g. Belot's or STAR-H3 model). Also concentration of organically bound tritium in the seed is predicted and compared with measurements. The results can be used to predict the tritium concentration in the rice plant at a field around the site and the ingestion dose following the release of tritium to the environment.
Date: February 26, 2002
Creator: Yook, D-S.; Lee, K. J. & Choi, Y-H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A SOLUTION FOR TM-MODE PLANE WAVES INCIDENT ON A TWO-DIMENSIONAL INHOMOGENEITY

Description: A solution for the electromagnetic fields scattered from a two-dimensional inhomogeneity in a conducting half space has been obtained for an incident TM mode plane wave; the magnetic field is polarized parallel to the strike of the inhomogeneity. The approach has been to determine the scattering currents within the inhomogeneity using an integral equation for the electric fields. This solution is similar in concept to earlier studies of TE mode scattering from two-dimensional inhomogeneities, and it completes the analysis of the scattering of arbitrary plane waves using the integral equation approach. For simple bodies in the earth integral equation solution offers significant computational advantages over alternate finite element or finite difference methods of solution.
Date: March 1, 1980
Creator: Lee, K.H. & Morrision, H.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The two polymorphs of N-DNAT, a high nitrogen molecule

Description: A novel azo triazole molecule was prepared. Based on X-ray crystallography data, this molecule, 1,1{prime}-dinitro-3,3{prime}-azo-1,2,4-triazole (N-DNAT) exists in two forms. The yellow color polymorph has a crystal density of 1.701 g/cm{sup 3}, while the density of the orange crystal is 1.831 g/cm{sup 3}. Data from specific impulse (Isp) calculation indicates that N-DNAT is a potential candidate for propellant applications.
Date: September 1995
Creator: Lee, K. Y. & Chan, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Building and Running the Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Model in a Quality Environment

Description: A Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) model has been developed to support the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the Yucca Mountain High-Level Waste Repository. The TSPA model forecasts repository performance over a 20,000-year simulation period. It has a high degree of complexity due to the complexity of its underlying process and abstraction models. This is reflected in the size of the model (a 27,000 element GoldSim file), its use of dynamic-linked libraries (14 DLLs), the number and size of its input files (659 files totaling 4.7 GB), and the number of model input parameters (2541 input database entries). TSPA model development and subsequent simulations with the final version of the model were performed to a set of Quality Assurance (QA) procedures. Due to the complexity of the model, comments on previous TSPAs, and the number of analysts involved (22 analysts in seven cities across four time zones), additional controls for the entire life-cycle of the TSPA model, including management, physical, model change, and input controls were developed and documented. These controls did not replace the QA. procedures, rather they provided guidance for implementing the requirements of the QA procedures with the specific intent of ensuring that the model development process and the simulations performed with the final version of the model had sufficient checking, traceability, and transparency. Management controls were developed to ensure that only management-approved changes were implemented into the TSPA model and that only management-approved model runs were performed. Physical controls were developed to track the use of prototype software and preliminary input files, and to ensure that only qualified software and inputs were used in the final version of the TSPA model. In addition, a system was developed to name, file, and track development versions of the TSPA model as well as simulations performed with the final ...
Date: January 9, 2005
Creator: Kalinich, D.A.; Lee, K.P. & McNeish, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model Analyses of Heterogeneity and Thermal-Loading Factors for the Proposed Repository at Yucca Mountain

Description: The MultiScale ThermoHydrologic Model (MSTHM) predicts thermohydrologic (TH) conditions in emplacement drifts and the adjoining host rock throughout the proposed nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The MSTHM is a computationally efficient approach that accounts for TH processes occurring at a scale of a few tens of centimeters around individual waste packages and emplacement drifts, and for heat flow at the multi-kilometer scale at Yucca Mountain. The modeling effort presented here is an early investigation of the repository and is simulated at a lower temperature mode and with a different panel loading than the repository currently being considered for license application. We present these recent lower temperature mode MSTHM simulations that address the influence of repository-scale thermal-conductivity heterogeneity and the influence of preclosure operational factors affecting thermal-loading conditions. We can now accommodate a complex repository layout with emplacement drifts lying in non-parallel planes using a superposition process that combines results from multiple mountain-scale submodels. This development, along with other improvements to the MSTHM, enables more rigorous analyses of preclosure operational factors. These improvements include the ability to (1) predict TH conditions on a drift-by-drift basis, (2) represent sequential emplacement of waste packages along the drifts, and (3) incorporate distance- and time-dependent heat-removal efficiency associated with drift ventilation. Alternative approaches to addressing repository-scale thermal-conductivity heterogeneity are investigated. We find that only one of the four MSTHM submodel types needs to incorporate thermal-conductivity heterogeneity. For a particular repository design, we find that the most influential parameters are (1) percolation-flux distribution, (2) thermal-conductivity heterogeneity within the host-rock units, (3) the sequencing of waste-package emplacement, and (4) the duration of the preclosure ventilation period.
Date: November 11, 2002
Creator: Glascoe, L.G.; Buscheck, T.A.; Gansemer, J.; Sun, Y. & Lee, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electrical and electromagnetic methods for reservoir description and process monitoring. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

Description: It is well known that electrical conductivity of rock is closely related to the porosity, hydrologic permeability, saturation, and the type of fluid in it. These rock parameters play important roles in the development and production of hydrocarbon (petroleum and natural gas) resources. For these reasons, resistivity well logs have long been used by geologists and reservoir engineers in petroleum industries to map variations in pore fluid, to distinguish between rock types, and to determine completion intervals in wells. Reservoir simulation and process monitoring rely heavily on the physical characteristics of the reservoir model. At the beginning of FY-91 a coordinated electrical and electromagnetic (EM) geophysical research program for petroleum reservoir characterization and process monitoring was initiated. Parties involved in this program include Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and University of California at Berkeley (UCB). The overall objectives of the program were: to integrate research funded by DOE for hydrocarbon recovery into a focused effort to demonstrate the technology in the shortest time with the least cost; to assure industry acceptance of the technology developed by having industry involvement in the planning, implementation, and funding of the research; to focus the research on real world problems that have the potential for solution in the near term with significant energy payoff. Specific research activities conducted have been in the following areas: (1) EM modeling development; (2) data interpretation methods development; (3) hardware and instrumentation development; (4) EOR and reservoir characterization; (5) controlled field experiments. The primary focus of these activities was in the development of reliable inversion and imaging schemes that could yield conductivity distributions from measured electrical and EM field data.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Morrison, H.F.; Lee, K.H. & Becker, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electrical resistivity for detecting subsurface non-aqueous phase liquids: A progress report

Description: Soils and groundwater have been contaminated by hazardous substances at many places in the United States and many other countries. The contaminants are commonly either petroleum products or industrial solvents with very low solubility in water. These contaminants are usually called non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The cost of cleaning up the affected sites in the United States is estimated to be of the order of 100 billion dollars. In spite of the expenditure of several billion dollars during the last 15 years, to date, very few, if any major contaminated site has been restored. The presence of NAPL pools in the subsurface is believed to be the main cause for the failure of previous cleanup activities. Due to their relatively low water solubility, and depending on their volume, it takes tens or even hundreds of years to deplete the NAPL sources if they are not removed from the subsurface. The intrinsic electrical resistivity of most NAPLs is typically in the range of 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 12}{Omega}-m, which is several orders of magnitude higher than that of groundwater containing dissolved solids (usually in the range of a few {Omega}-m to a few thousand {Omega}-m). Although a dry soil is very resistive, the electrical resistivity of a wet soil is on the order of 100 {Omega}-m and is dependent on the extent of water saturation. For a given soil, the electrical resistivity increases with decrease of water saturation. Therefore, if part of the pore water is replaced by a NAPL, the electrical resistivity will increase. At many NAPL sites, both the vadose and phreatic zones can be partially occupied by NAPL pools. It is the great contrast in electrical resistivity between the NAPLs and groundwater that may render the method to be effective in detecting subsurface NAPLs at contaminated sites. The ...
Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Lee, K.H.; Shan, C. & Javandel, I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electromagnetic Fields Due to a Loop Current in a CasedBorehole Surrounded by Uniform Whole Space

Description: Precise evaluation of electromagnetic (EM) response in steel-cased borehole is an essential first step towards developing techniques for casing parameter evaluation, which would ultimately help evaluating the formation response. In this report we demonstrate a numerical scheme for accurately computing EM responses in cased borehole environment. For improved numerical accuracy we use explicit representations of the electromagnetic spectra inside the borehole, in the casing, and in the formation. Instead of conventional Hankel transform, FFT is used to improve the numerical accuracy. The FFT approach allows us to compute fields at positions very close to the source loop, including the center of the transmitter loop.
Date: January 1998
Creator: Lee, K. H. & Song, Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of geophysical methods for fracture characterization

Description: One of the most crucial needs in the design and implementation of an underground waste isolation facility is a reliable method for the detection and characterization of fractures in zones away from boreholes or subsurface workings. Geophysical methods may represent a solution to this problem. If fractures represent anomalies in the elastic properties or conductive properties of the rocks, then the seismic and electrical techniques may be useful in detecting and characterizing fracture properties. 7 refs., 3 figs.
Date: January 1, 1990
Creator: Lee, K.H.; Majer, E.L.; McEvilly, T.V. & Morrison, H.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electromagnetic method for analyzing the property of steel casing

Description: It has been shown that electromagnetic (EM) imaging, in particular in borehole applications, can be effective in characterizing and monitoring subsurface processes involved in improved oil recovery operations and production management. In this report the authors present an innovative EM method for extracting information about a steel casing in terms of its electrical conductivity, magnetic permeability, and the casing thickness. The method is based on accurate evaluation of magnetic fields near the transmitting loop in a steel-cased borehole, and the least squares inversion of thus measured data. The need to make measurements close to the source stems from the two related considerations. One reason is that by making measurements close to the transmitter one can keep the formation response from entering the measurement to a minimum. The other reason concerns with the practical consideration involved in fabricating a borehole tool. The measurement accuracy in terms of PPM to the primary field can best be achieved when the transmitter and receiver are close to each other. To facilitate this requirement one can consider a single loop acting as the source and the receiver operating in time domain, or a closely coupled frequency-domain system with the source-receiver separation of just a few inches apart. Results are discussed.
Date: February 1, 1998
Creator: Lee, K.H.; Kim, H.J. & Song, Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Detonation spreading in fine TATBs

Description: A test has been devised that permits rapid evaluation of the detonation-spreading (or corner-turning) properties of detonations in insensitive high explosives. The test utilizes a copper witness plate as the medium to capture performance data. Dent depth and shape in the copper are used as quantitative measures of the detonation output and spreading behavior. The merits of the test are that it is easy to perform with no dynamic instrumentation, and the test requires only a few grams of experimental explosive materials.
Date: December 31, 1998
Creator: Kennedy, J.E.; Lee, K.Y.; Spontarelli, T. & Stine, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Time-Resolved Sequence Analysis on High Density Fiberoptic DNA Probe

Description: A universal array format has been developed in which all possible n-mers of a particular oligonucleotide sequence can be represented. The ability to determine the sequence of the probes at every position in the array should enable unbiased gene expression as well as arrays for de novo sequencing.
Date: November 19, 2002
Creator: Walt, D. R. & Lee, K-H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department