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Partial removal of correlated noise in thermal imagery

Description: Correlated noise occurs in many imaging systems such as scanners and push-broom imagers. The sources of correlated noise can be from the detectors, pre-amplifiers and sampling circuits. Correlated noise appears as streaking along the scan direction of a scanner or in the along track direction of a push-broom imager. We have developed algorithms to simulate correlated noise and pre-filter to reduce the amount of streaking while not destroying the scene content. The pre- filter in the Fourier domain consists of the product of two filters. One filter models the correlated noise spectrum, the other is a windowing function e.g. Gaussian or Hanning window with variable width to block high frequency noise away from the origin of the Fourier Transform of the image data. We have optimized the filter parameters for various scenes and find improvements of the RMS error of the original minus the pre-filtered noisy image.
Date: April 1, 1996
Creator: Borel, C.C.; Cooke, B.J. & Laubscher, B.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis and design methodology for the development of optimized, direct-detection CO{sub 2} DIAL receivers

Description: The analysis methodology and corresponding analytical tools for the design of optimized, low-noise, hard target return CO{sub 2} Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) receiver systems implementing both single element detectors and multi-pixel imaging arrays for passive/active, remote-sensing applications are presented. System parameters and components composing the receiver include: aperture, focal length, field of view, cold shield requirements, image plane dimensions, pixel dimensions, pixel pitch and fill factor, detection quantum efficiency, optical filter requirements, amplifier and temporal sampling parameters. The performance analysis is accomplished by calculating the system`s CO{sub 2} laser range response, total noise, optical geometric form factor and optical resolution. The noise components include speckle, photon noise due to signal, scene and atmospheric background, cold shield, and electronic noise. System resolution is simulated through cascaded optical transfer functions and includes effects due to atmosphere, optics, image sampling, and system motion. Experimental results of a developmental single-element detector receiver designed to detect 100 ns wide laser pulses (10 - 100 kHz pulse repetition rates) backscattered from hard-targets at nominal ranges of 10 km are presented. The receiver sensitivity is near-background noise limited, given an 8.5-11.5 {mu}m radiant optical bandwidth, with the total noise floor spectrally white for maximum pulse averaging efficiency.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Cooke, B.J.; Laubscher, B.E. & Cafferty, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LANL receiver system development

Description: The CALIOPE receiver system development at LANL is the story of two technologies. The first of these technologies consists of off-the-shelf mercury-cadmium-telluride (MCT) detectors and amplifiers. The vendor for this system is Kolmar Technologies. This system was fielded in the Tan Trailer I (TTI) in 1995 and will be referred to in this paper as GEN I. The second system consists of a MCT detector procured from Santa Barbara Research Center (SBRC) and an amplifier designed and built by LANL. This system was fielded in the Tan Trailer II (TTII) system at the NTS tests in 1996 and will be referred to as GEN II. The LANL CALIOPE experimental plan for 1996 was to improve the lidar system by progressing to a higher rep rate laser to perform many shots in a much shorter period of time. In keeping with this plan, the receiver team set a goal of developing a detector system that was background limited for the projected 100 nanosecond (ns) laser pulse. A set of detailed simulations of the DIAL lidar experiment was performed. From these runs, parameters such as optimal detector size, field of view of the receiver system, nominal laser return power, etc. were extracted. With this information, detector physics and amplifier electronic models were developed to obtain the required specifications for each of these components. These derived specs indicated that a substantial improvement over commercially available, off-the-shelf, amplifier and detector technologies would be needed to obtain the goals. To determine if the original GEN I detector was usable, the authors performed tests on a 100 micron square detector at cryogenic temperatures. The results of this test and others convinced them that an advanced detector was required. Eventually, a suitable detector was identified and a number of these single element detectors were procured from SBRC. ...
Date: August 1, 1997
Creator: Laubscher, B.; Cooke, B.; Cafferty, M. & Olivas, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis and System Design Framework for Infrared Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometers

Description: The authors present a preliminary analysis and design framework developed for the evaluation and optimization of infrared, Imaging Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer (SHS) electro-optic systems. Commensurate with conventional interferometric spectrometers, SHS modeling requires an integrated analysis environment for rigorous evaluation of system error propagation due to detection process, detection noise, system motion, retrieval algorithm and calibration algorithm. The analysis tools provide for optimization of critical system parameters and components including : (1) optical aperture, f-number, and spectral transmission, (2) SHS interferometer grating and Littrow parameters, and (3) image plane requirements as well as cold shield, optical filtering, and focal-plane dimensions, pixel dimensions and quantum efficiency, (4) SHS spatial and temporal sampling parameters, and (5) retrieval and calibration algorithm issues.
Date: April 5, 1999
Creator: Cooke, B.J.; Smith, B.W.; Laubscher, B.E.; Villeneuve, P.V. & Briles, S.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Low-noise detector and amplifier design for 100 ns direct detection CO{sub 2} LIDAR receiver

Description: The development and test results of a prototype detector/amplifier design for a background limited, pulsed 100 ns, 10--100 kHz repetition rate LIDAR/DIAL receiver system are presented. Design objectives include near-matched filter detection of received pulse amplitude and round trip time-of-flight, and the elimination of excess correlated detector/amplifier noise for optimal pulse averaging. A novel pole-zero cancellation amplifier, coupled with a state-of-the-art SBRC (Santa Barbara Research Center) infrared detector was implemented to meet design objectives. The pole-zero cancellation amplifier utilizes a tunable, pseudo-matched filter technique to match the width of the laser pulse to the shaping time of the filter for optimal SNR performance. Low frequency correlated noise, (l/f and drift noise) is rejected through a second order high gain feedback loop. The amplifier also employs an active detector bias stage minimizing detector drift. Experimental results will be provided that demonstrate near-background limited, 100 ns pulse detection performance given a 8.5--11.5 {micro}m (300 K B.B.) radiant background, with the total noise floor spectrally white for optimal pulse averaging efficiency.
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Cafferty, M.M.; Cooke, B.J.; Laubscher, B.E.; Olivas, N.L. & Fuller, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

End-to-end performance modeling of passive remote sensing systems

Description: The ultimate goal of end-to-end system modeling is to simulate all known physical effects which determine the content of the data, before flying an instrument system. In remote sensing, one begins with a scene, viewed either statistically or dynamically, computes the radiance in each spectral band, renders the scene, transfers it through representative atmospheres to create the radiance field at an aperture, and integrates over sensor pixels. We have simulated a comprehensive sequence of realistic instrument hardware elements and the transfer of simulated data to an analysis system. This analysis package is the same as that intended for use of data collections from the real system. By comparing the analyzed image to the original scene, the net effect of nonideal system components can be understood. Iteration yields the optimum values of system parameters to achieve performance targets. We have used simulation to develop and test improved multispectral algorithms for (1) the robust retrieval of water surface temperature, water vapor column, and other quantities; (2) the preservation of radiometric accuracy during atmospheric correction and pixel registration on the ground; and (3) exploitation of on-board multispectral measurements to assess the atmosphere between ground and aperture.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Smith, B.W.; Borel, C.C.; Clodius, W.B.; Theiler, J.; Laubscher, B. & Weber, P.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CO{sub 2} dial transmitter/receiver noise characterization and related correlated noise issues

Description: Our approach concerning the development of hard target return CO{sub 2} DIAL transmitter/receiver systems is two phased- (i) through analysis and experiment, develop a fundamental understanding of the transmitter/receiver physics specific to DIAL systems and (ii) apply these fundamentals in the development of optimal performance DIAL transmitter/receiver systems. We present our progress and results towards these objectives with the following topics addressed: A general overview of the DIAL transmitter/receiver system characterization effort with a focus on transceiver noise processes. The effects of correlated noise on DIAL performance, especially those effecting statistical convergence over long sample structures, is , introduced. And, preliminary measurements of a low-noise, ``white`` receiver prototype are presented.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Cooke, B.; Schmitt, M.; Goeller, R.; Czuchlewski, S.; Fuller, K.; Olivas, N. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coherent electromagnetic field imaging through Fourier transform heterodyne

Description: The authors present a detection process capable of directly imaging the transverse amplitude, phase, and if desired, Doppler shift of coherent electromagnetic fields. Based on coherent detection principles governing conventional heterodyned RADAR/LIDAR systems, Fourier Transform Heterodyne (FTH) incorporates transverse spatial encoding of the local oscillator for image capture. Appropriate selection of spatial encoding functions, or basis set, allows image retrieval by way of classic Fourier manipulations. Of practical interest: (1) imaging is accomplished on a single element detector requiring no additional scanning or moving components, and (2) a wide variety of appropriate spatial encoding functions exist that may be adaptively configured in real-time for applications requiring optimal detection. In this paper, they introduce the underlying principles governing FTH imaging, followed by demonstration of concept via a simple experimental setup based on a HeNe laser and a 69 element spatial phase modulator.
Date: December 1998
Creator: Cooke, B. J.; Laubscher, B. E.; Olivas, N. L.; Goeller, R. M.; Cafferty, M.; Briles, S. D. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laser Field Imaging Through Fourier Transform Heterodyne

Description: The authors present a detection process capable of directly imaging the transverse amplitude, phase, and Doppler shift of coherent electromagnetic fields. Based on coherent detection principles governing conventional heterodyned RADAR/LADAR systems, Fourier Transform Heterodyne incorporates transverse spatial encoding of the reference local oscillator for image capture. Appropriate selection of spatial encoding functions allows image retrieval by way of classic Fourier manipulations. Of practical interest: (1) imaging may be accomplished with a single element detector/sensor requiring no additional scanning or moving components, (2) as detection is governed by heterodyne principles, near quantum limited performance is achievable, (3) a wide variety of appropriate spatial encoding functions exist that may be adaptively configured in real-time for applications requiring optimal detection, and (4) the concept is general with the applicable electromagnetic spectrum encompassing the RF through optical.
Date: April 5, 1999
Creator: Cooke, B.J.; Laubscher, B.E.; Olivas, N.L.; Galbraith, A.E.; Strauss, C.E. & Grubler, A.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department