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Project W-236A multi-function waste tank facility waste feed projections

Description: A review of Hanford Underground Waste Storage Tank Chemistry, coupled with planned remediation actions and retrieval sequences was conducted in order to predict the chemistry of the waste to be stored in the MWTF tanks. All projected waste solutions to be transferred to the MWTF tanks were found to be in compliance with current tank chemistry specifications; therefore, the waste and the tank materials of construction are expected to be compatible.
Date: December 22, 1994
Creator: Larrick, A.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Source of process water scandium

Description: Rear face dose rates at the single pass reactors were found to have significantly increased between 1965 and 1967. It was suggested by Battelle-Northwest that an increase in scandium-46 activity may have been a possible cause of the increased dose rates. Battelle-Northwest records showed that considerably more {sup 46}Sc was present in the Columbia River at Richland starting in the summer of 1967 than had been found previously. The ratio of {sup 46}Sc to {sup 65}Zn activity, a correlation which removes seasonal variations in activity, was shown to have increased from 0.1 early in 1967 to l.0 by November of 1967. It was concluded that indeed the {sup 46}Sc release rate from the single pass reactors and the rear face dose es had increased in 1966 and 1967, but not necessarily at the same time {sup 3}. Data presented in the review showed that there had been no changes in parent {sup 45}Sc concentration in the Columbia River between 1962 and 1969, but there had been several changes in water chemistry in 1966 and 1967 which may have contributed to the increased {sup 46}Sc concentration in the reactor effluent. The review document suggested that rear face components be analyzed to verify whether or not the increased {sup 46}Sc concentration in the effluent water was indeed significantly contributing to rear dose rates and that inlet water be analyzed to determine if the increase in {sup 46}Sc was due to the addition of parent {sup 46}Sc with the water treatment chemicals. These analyses have been completed and are presented in this document along with other supporting data.
Date: June 12, 1970
Creator: Larrick, A.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

241-A evaporator flowsheet users manual

Description: This supporting document presents a description of the 242-A Evaporator flowsheet. Material balances are calculated for feed, slurry, and effluent streams based on input data for the feed stream.
Date: December 22, 1994
Creator: Larrick, A. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In-reactor corrosion: A paper presented at the 9th annual AEC Corrosion Symposium, Boston, Massachusetts, May 10--12, 1960

Description: Object of this paper is to present preliminary results of experiments in Hanford in-reactor loops to determine if exposure to neutrons will increase corrosion rates of Al alloys, Zy-2, and 304 stainless steel. Results were negligible or no corrosion.
Date: May 9, 1960
Creator: Larrick, A. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Half-plant low dichromate evaluation at KW Reactor: Production Test-176. Final report

Description: This final report details production test-176, the primary purpose of which was to provide a quantitative comparison of fuel element 8001 aluminum alloy cladding corrosion in cooling water containing 0.5 and 1.0 ppm sodium dichromate inhibitor. Secondary purposes were to provide information on cladding corrosion as a function of temperature and as a function of time at both inhibitor concentrations. The primary purpose was well fulfilled: Equations were developed to describe and predict fuel element weight losses at both dichromate concentrations and the effect of dichromate concentration on localized corrosion was clearly established. Little effect of dichromate concentration on localized corrosion was observed when fuel cladding temperatures were below 115--120 C but above these temperatures the localized corrosion definitely was more severe in coolant containing 0.5 ppm inhibitor. The bottom rows of fuel element supports rapidly corroded away at the higher temperatures which caused a further increase in local temperatures due to flow imbalances and this in turn accelerated the localized corrosion. Because the higher dichromate concentration reduced the amount of support corrosion, 1.0 ppm dichromate should be employed to control localized corrosion whenever cladding temperatures are expected to be above 120 C for long periods of time. These tests indicated that the corrosion occurring at exposures of 66 operating days, and with clad temperatures of 120 C or above, would not seriously limit fuel integrity at 0.5 ppm inhibitor but that for exposures of 105 operating days extensive pitting corrosion would be expected.
Date: September 30, 1970
Creator: Larrick, A. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technical bases for K Reactor dichromate and pH control

Description: This memorandum was written to provide additional technical basis for preparing Process Standards. Fuel surface-tube outlet temperature data is also provided. These data will help establish dichromate concentration and coolant pH based on the outlet coolant temperatures of the hottest reactor process tubes.
Date: November 12, 1970
Creator: Larrick, A. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Source of process water scandium

Description: An increase in scandium-46 activity has been suggested as a possible cause of K Reactor rear face dose rates. The first investigations were initiated on {sup 46}Sc in 1968 after Environmental Evaluation, BNW, reported the increase in the {sup 46}Sc activity in the Columbia River. The first investigation was to verify whether or not there had been any increase in parent material ({sup 45}Sc) in the Columbia River. The resulting neutron activation data for river samples taken at Vernita during the latter part of 1968 and the first part of 1969 are compared with data obtained in 1962 by Silker. These data show that there was no increase in parent scandium since 1962. There also appears to be no seasonal increase in parent scandium as occurs with several other elements such as zinc. This latter observation (based primarily on the 1962 data) is quite puzzling since the BNW river data from samples taken near Richland show a definite seasonal trend. The BNW data are shown. Scandium-46 analyses of the reactor effluent water were initiated in March 1969 and these data also fail to show any significant seasonal trend of the magnitude shown by the BNW data. The reactor effluent data are also given. Analysis of decontamination solutions obtained during the single-tube, through-reactor decontamination conducted in KE Reactor in October 1969 showed that there were more curies of {sup 46}Sc than any other isotope.
Date: January 20, 1970
Creator: Larrick, A. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nonuniform Aluminum Corrosion Program

Description: The purpose of this document is to summarize the status of the current non-uniform aluminum corrosion program. Also included are justifications for and descriptions of program activities which could continue through FY-1971.
Date: February 12, 1969
Creator: Sheppard, D.O. & Larrick, A.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Decontamination studies: Battelle-Northwest Laboratories, December 1964-- August 1965

Description: From ninth meeting of the USAEC reactor decontamination information exchange group; Washington, District of Columbia, USA (1 Sep 1965). The decontamination activity described includes: laboratory studies to evaluate reagents, and actual decontamination of 2 steam generators at New Production Reactor. ln laboratory tests, a proprietery oxalic acid solution appeared to be more effective th:dn sny other tried. No excessive corrosion was noted. Special reegents to dissolve high fired ceramic core materials (UO/sub 2/ and PuO/sub 2/) are being developed and evaluated. Phosphorous acid, sulfuric acid and a mixture of sulfuric and nitric acids were effective. Corrosion of 304 stainless steel was low. Two N Reactor steam generators were decontaminated to facilitate inspection and repair. The APSUL procedure was tried, but control of concentrations was inadequate and decontamination factors were low, ranging from 1.6 to 9.0. No excessive corrosion was noted. (auth)
Date: July 27, 1965
Creator: Ayres, J.A.; Larrick, A.P.; Perrigo, L.D. & Weed, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radioisotopes released in DUN liquid effluents

Description: Per your request, we have summarized for both the single-pass reactors and N Reactor the amount of radioisotopes released in DUN reactor liquid effluents. Wherever possible, the sources of the radioisotope and the important parameters which influence the release of the radioisotope have been identified. Because of the great dissimilarities between the two types of reactors, the data are discussed on an individual basis.
Date: March 26, 1970
Creator: Larrick, A. P.; Baker, D. A. & Coffer, C. O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Material selection for Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility tanks

Description: This paper briefly summarizes the history of the materials selection for the US Department of Energy`s high-level waste carbon steel storage tanks. It also provides an evaluation of the materials for the construction of new tanks at the evaluation of the materials for the construction of new tanks at the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. The evaluation included a materials matrix that summarized the critical design, fabrication, construction, and corrosion resistance requirements: assessed. each requirement: and cataloged the advantages and disadvantages of each material. This evaluation is based on the mission of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. On the basis of the compositions of the wastes stored in Hanford waste tanks, it is recommended that tanks for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility be constructed of ASME SA 515, Grade 70, carbon steel.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Larrick, A. P.; Blackburn, L. D.; Brehm, W. F.; Carlos, W. C.; Hauptmann, J. P.; Danielson, M. J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An assessment of the dilution required to mitigate Hanford tank 241-SY-101

Description: A group of experts from PNL and WHC convened November 2 and 3, 1994, to screen the current state of knowledge about dilution and reach a consensus on the minimum dilution ratio that will achieve passive mitigation of Tank 241-SY-101 wastes and the dilution ratio that would satisfy the given cross-site transfer criteria with reasonable assurance. The panel evaluated the effects of dilution on the parameters important in gas generation, retention, and release and reached the following conclusions, which are deduced from the existing body of data, experience, and analyses: (1) Dissolution of solids is the single most important aspect of mitigation by dilution. We are confident that diluting until nitrates, nitrites, and aluminum salts are dissolved will mitigate Hanford flammable gas tanks; (2) Sufficient solids dissolution can be achieved in Tank 241-SY-101 at a dilution ratio of 1:1, which will result in a average specific gravity of approximately 1.35. It is likely that a 0.5:1 dilution will also mitigate 241-SY-101, but the current uncertainty is too high to recommend this dilution ratio; (3) The recommended dilution requires a diluent with at least 2 molar free hydroxide, because aluminum probably precipitates at lower hydroxide concentrations. The transfer criteria for Tank 241-SY-101 waste were also evaluated. These criteria have been specified as solids content {<=}30% (volume), viscosity {<=}30% cP and density <1.5 g/mL. (1) Solids content is the limiting criterion if it is defined as volume fraction of settled solids. A 1:1 dilution will satisfy this criterion at nominal premixing conditions in Tank 241-SY-101; however, analysis of Window E core samples suggests that up to 1.5:1 might be required. If the solids content is interpreted simply as solids volume fraction no further dilution is necessary, because Tank 241-SY-101 waste (excluding the crust) is already below 30%; (2) Bulk density is the ...
Date: February 1, 1995
Creator: Hudson, J. D.; Bredt, P. R.; Felmy, A. R.; Stewart, C. W.; Tingey, J. M.; Trent, D. S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department