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Radionuclide-Chelating Agent Complexes in Low-Level Radioactive Decontamination Waste; Stability, Adsorption and Transport Potential

Description: Speciation calculations were done to determine whether organic complexants facilitate transport of radionuclides leached from waste buried in soils. EDTA readily mobilizes divalent transition metals and moderately impacts trivalent actinides. Picolinate readily mobilizes only Ni2+ and Co2+. These speciation predictions ignore the influence of soil adsorption and biodegradation that break apart the complexes. In adsorption studies, picolinate concentrations have to be >10-4 M to lower the adsorption of Ni and Co. For Sm(III), Th(IV), Np(V), U(VI), and Pu, the picolinate concentration must be >10-3 M before adsorption decreases. EDTA forms strong complexes with divalent transition metals and can stop adsorption of Ni and Co when EDTA solution concentrations are 10-5 M. EDTA complexes with Np(V), U(VI), and Pu are much weaker; EDTA concentrations would have to be >10-3 M to adversely effects non-transition metal/radionuclide adsorption. Most picolinate and ETDA-metal complexes appear to readily dissociate during interactions with soils. The enhanced migration of radionuclide-organic complexes may be limited to a few unique conditions. We recommend that mixtures of metal/radionuclides and EDTA should not be solidified or co-disposed with high pH materials such as cement. For weaker binding organic complexants, such as picolinate, citrate and oxalate, co-disposal of decontamination wastes and concrete should be acceptable.
Date: February 1, 2002
Creator: Serne, R. Jeffrey; Cantrell, Cantrell J.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Orr, Robert D. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of 200-UP-1 Aquifer Sediments and Results of Sorption-Desorption Tests Using Spiked Uncontaminated Groundwater

Description: Core characterization showed only 4 out of 13 core liner samples were intact samples and that the others were slough material. The intact samples showed typical Ringold Unit E characteristics such as being dominated by gravel and sand. Moderately reducing conditions are inferred in some core from borehole C4299. This reducing condition was caused by the hard tool process used to drill the wells. One core showed significant presence of ferric iron oxide/clay coatings on the gravels. There were no highly contaminated sediments found in the cores from the three new boreholes in UP-1 operable unit, especially for uranium. The presence of slough and ''flour'' caused by hard tooling is a serious challenge to obtaining field relevant sediments for use in geochemical experiments to determine the adsorption-desorption tendencies of redox sensitive elements such as uranium. The adsorption of COCs on intact Ringold Formation sediments and Fe/clay coatings showed that most of the anionic contaminants [Tc(VII), Se(VI), U(VI), Cr(VI), and I(-I)] did not adsorbed very well compared to cationic [Np(V), Sr(II), and Cs(I)] radionuclides. The high hydrous iron oxide content in Fe/clay coatings caused the highest Kd values for U and Np, suggesting these hydrous oxides are the key solid adsorbent in the sediments. Enhanced adsorption behavior for Tc, and Cr and perhaps Se on the sediments was considered an ?artifact? result caused by the induced reducing conditions from the hard tool drilling. Additional U(VI) adsorption Kd studies were performed on Ringold Formation sediments to develop more robust Kd data base for U. The <2 mm size separates of three UP-1 sediments showed a linear U(VI) adsorption isotherm up 1 ppm of total U(VI) concentration in solution. The additional U(VI) Kds obtained from varying carbonate concentration indicated that U(VI) adsorption was strongly influenced by the concentration of carbonate in solution. U(VI) ...
Date: November 16, 2005
Creator: Um, Wooyong; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Brown, Christopher F.; Legore, Virginia L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of Accelerated Casing Corrosion in Two Wells at Waste Management Area A-AX

Description: This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 3.13 and 3.14. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in August 2005. An overall goal of the Groundwater Performance Assessment Project, led by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and per guidance in DOE Order 5400.1, includes characterizing and defining trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of the environment. To meet these goals, numerous Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) monitoring wells have been installed throughout the Hanford Site. In 2003, it was determined that two RCRA monitoring wells (299-E24-19 and 299-E25-46) in Waste Management Area (WMA) A-AX failed due to rapid corrosion of the stainless steel casing over a significant length of the wells. Complete casing corrosion occurred between 276.6 and 277.7 feet below ground surface (bgs) in well 299- E24-19 and from 274.4 to 278.6 feet bgs in well 299-E25-46. CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from PNNL to perform detailed analyses of vadose zone sediment samples collected in the vicinity of the WMA A-AX from depths comparable to those where the rapid corrosion occurred in hopes of ascertaining the cause of the rapid corrosion.
Date: September 11, 2008
Creator: Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Legore, Virginia L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of Accelerated Casing Corrosion in Two Wells at Waste Management Area A-AX

Description: The sidewall core samples from well 299-E24-19, which were comprised of a mixture of bentonite and silt lens material, had an average porewater chloride concentration of 376 mg/L. The sidewall core samples collected from well 299-E25-46 had calculated porewater chloride concentrations ranging from 1,200 to more than 10,000 mg/L. Clearly, the sidewall core samples tested were capable of generating porewaters with sufficient chloride concentrations to cause corrosion of the stainless steel well casing. Furthermore, analysis of the sidewall core samples yielded a clear relationship between chloride concentration and well casing corrosion. The sidewall core samples containing the greatest amount of chloride, 3000 {micro}g/g of sediment, came from the well that experienced the longest length of casing failure (4.2 feet in well 299-E25-46). All of the sidewall core samples tested from both decommissioned wells contained more chloride than the Wyoming bentonite test material. However, since chloride was present as a trace constituent in all of the sidewall core samples (less than 0.4 weight percent), it is possible that it could have been introduced to the system as a ''contaminant'' contained in the bentonite backfill material. Therefore, it is likely that chloride leached from the bentonite material and/or chloride carried by/as a constituent of the liquid waste stream caused the advanced well casing corrosion found at wells 299-E24-19 and 299-E25-46 via crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The sample of Enviroplug{trademark} No.8 high swelling Wyoming bentonite was characterized for its potential to generate porewaters of sufficient chlorinity to lead to accelerated corrosion of type 304L stainless steel. Overall, the bentonite sample had considerably high water extractable concentrations of sodium, chloride, fluoride, sulfate, and alkalinity (measured as calcium carbonate). Interpretation of the laboratory data indicated that the Wyoming bentonite test sample was capable of generating localized vadose zone porewater with chloride concentrations in ...
Date: August 29, 2005
Creator: Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Valenta, Michelle M.; LeGore, Virginia L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Slant Borehole SX-108 in the S-SX Waste Management Area

Description: This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 4.17. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is the fourth in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from a slant borehole installed beneath tank SX-108 (or simply SX-108 slant borehole).
Date: September 11, 2008
Creator: Serne, R. Jeffrey; Last, George V.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Ainsworth, Calvin C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Uncontaminated RCRA Borehole Core Samples and Composite Samples

Description: This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.14, 4.16, 5.20, 5.22, 5.43, and 5.45. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is one in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) borehole bore samples and composite samples.
Date: September 11, 2008
Creator: Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Lanigan, David C.; Horton, Duane G. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the C Tank Farm: Borehole C4297 and RCRA Borehole 299-E27-22

Description: The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) C. This report is the first of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from borehole C4297, installed adjacent to Tank C-105, and from borehole 299-E27-22, installed directly north of the C Tank Farm. Sediments from borehole 299-E27-22 were considered to be background uncontaminated sediments against which to compare contaminated sediments for the C Tank Farm characterization effort. This report also presents our interpretation of the data in the context of sediment types, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone and groundwater below the C Tank Farm. The information presented in this report supports the A-AX, C and U Waste Management Area field investigation report(a) in preparation by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. A core log was generated for both boreholes and a geologic evaluation of all core samples was performed at the time of opening. Aliquots of sediment from the borehole core samples were analyzed and characterized in the laboratory for the following parameters: moisture content, gamma-emitting radionuclides, one-to-one water extracts (which provide soil pH, electrical conductivity, cation, trace metal, and anion data), total carbon and inorganic carbon content, and 8 M nitric acid extracts (which provide a measure of the total leachable sediment content of contaminants). Two key radiocontaminants, technetium-99 ...
Date: October 18, 2006
Creator: Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. JEFFREY; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Clayton, Ray E. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the C Tank Farm: Borehole C4297 and RCRA Borehole 299-E27-22

Description: This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.7 and 4.25. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in September 2006. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at the Hanford Site. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) C. This report is the first of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physiochemical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from borehole C4297, installed adjacent to tank C-105, and from borehole 299-E27-22, installed directly north of the C Tank Farm. This report also presents the interpretation of data in the context of sediment types, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone below the C Tank Farm. The information presented in this report supports the WMA A-AX, C, and U field investigation report in preparation by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc.
Date: September 11, 2008
Creator: Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Clayton, Ray E. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the T Tank Farm: Boreholes C4104, C4105, 299-W10-196, and RCRA Borehole 299-W11-39

Description: This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.8, 4.28, and 4.52. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in September 2004. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) T-TX-TY. This report is the second of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from boreholes C4104 and C4105 in the T Tank Farm, and from borehole 299-W-11-39 installed northeast of the T Tank Farm. Finally, the measurements on sediments from borehole C4104 are compared with a nearby borehole drilled in 1993, 299- W10-196, through the tank T-106 leak plume.
Date: September 11, 2008
Creator: Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lindenmeier, Clark W. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the TX Tank Farm: Boreholes C3830, C3831, C3832 and RCRA Borehole 299-W10-27

Description: This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.8, 4.28,4.43, and 4.59. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in April 2004. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) T-TX-TY. This report is the first of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from boreholes C3830, C3831, and C3832 in the TX Tank Farm, and from borehole 299-W-10-27 installed northeast of the TY Tank Farm.
Date: September 11, 2008
Creator: Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments from C Waste Management Area: Investigation of the C-152 Transfer Line Leak

Description: The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in January 2007. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within waste management area (WMA) C. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physiochemical characterization data compiled on vadose zone sediment recovered from direct-push samples collected around the site of an unplanned release (UPR), UPR-200-E-82, adjacent to the 241-C-152 Diversion Box located in WMA C.
Date: September 11, 2008
Creator: Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Lanigan, David C.; Vickerman, Tanya S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Borehole 299-E33-45 Near BX-102 in the B-BX-BY Waste Management Area

Description: This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 4.22. The data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The remaining text is unchanged from the original report issued in 2002. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area B-BX-BY. This report is the first in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from borehole 299-E33-45 installed northeast of tank BX-102.
Date: September 11, 2008
Creator: Serne, R. Jeffrey; Last, George V.; Gee, Glendon W.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Borehole 299-W23-19 [SX-115] in the S-SX Waste Management Area

Description: This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.15 and 4.19. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project is led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. Their goals include defining risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities, identifying and evaluating the efficacy of interim measures, and collecting geotechnical information and data. The purpose of these activities is to support future decisions made by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regarding near-term operations, future waste retrieval, and final closure activities for the single-shell tank Waste Management Areas. To help in this effort, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. contracted with scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to analyze sediment samples collected from borehole 299-W23-19.
Date: September 11, 2008
Creator: Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Gee, Glendon W.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Clayton, Ray E. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: RCRA Borehole 299-E33-338 Located Near the B-BX-BY Waste Management Area

Description: This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 4.8. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in June 2003. The overall goals of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., are: 1) to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities, 2) to identify and evaluate the efficacy of interim measures, and 3) to aid via collection of geotechnical information and data, future decisions that must be made by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regarding the near-term operations, future waste retrieval, and final closure activities for the single-shell tank waste management areas. For a more complete discussion of the goals of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, see the overall work plan, Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas (DOE 1999). Specific details on the rationale for activities performed at the B-BX-BY tank farm waste management area are found in CH2M HILL (2000).
Date: September 11, 2008
Creator: Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Gee, Glendon W.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Borehole 41-09-39 in the S-SX Waste Management Area

Description: This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 5.15. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is one in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from borehole 41-09-39 installed adjacent to tank SX-109.
Date: September 11, 2008
Creator: Serne, R. Jeffrey; Last, George V.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Ainsworth, Calvin C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Direct Push Vadose Zone Sediments from the T and TY Waste Management Areas

Description: This report contains all the geochemical and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from 5 direct push characterization holes emplaced to investigate vadose zone contamination associated with leaks from tanks 241-TY-105 (UPR-200-W-152) and 241-TY-106 (UPR-200-W-153). Tank 241-TY-105 is estimated to have leaked 35,000 gal of tributyl phosphate (TBP) waste from the uranium recovery process to the vadose zone in 1960. Tank 241-TY-106 is estimated to have leaked 20,000 gal of TBP-uranium recovery waste to the vadose zone in 1959. Although several drywells in the vicinity of tank 241-TY-106 contain measurable quantities of cesium-137 and/or cobalt-60, their relatively low concentrations indicate that the contaminant inventory in the vadose zone around tank 241-TY-106 is quite small. Additionally, this report contains all the geochemical and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from 7 direct push characterization holes emplaced to investigate vadose zone contamination associated with an overfill event and leak from tank 241-T-101.
Date: June 8, 2007
Creator: Brown, Christopher F.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Iovin, Cristian et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Direct-Push Vadose Zone Sediments from the 241-B and 241-BX Tank Farms

Description: Geochemical tests provide evidence for the transit of a plume of caustic waste solution through the sediment column at the Hanford 241-B and -BX Tank Farms. Direct-push samples recovered from boreholes surrounding Tanks 241-B-110 and 241-BX-102 and related waste transfer lines and diversion boxes included sediments typical of those previously recovered from other localities on the Hanford Site. The Hanford formation sediments are dominantly quartzo-feldspathic sands strewn with lithic fragments, displaying a range of particle size distributions and sorting characteristics. Some moderately well-sorted, fine-grained lithologies are interpreted as lenticular bodies irregularly dispersed in coarser-grained, more poorly sorted sediments. Tier I tests conducted on the vadose zone sediments revealed an inverse correlation between moisture content and sediment size fraction (i.e., there is greater moisture content in finer-grained sediments). The Tier I tests also showed that the pore water solutions were likely sodium-rich, moderately saline, and possessed higher pH values than background (untainted) sediments. These data are characteristic of sediments that have encountered sodium-rich, saline, caustic waste solution, as documented in other reports at other suspect contamination sites around Hanford. Analyses of solutions from 1:1 water extracts reveal relatively balanced cation and anion concentrations, indicating that most of the geochemical species have been accounted for. The water extract data for affected sediments also indicate unusually high concentrations of aluminum, iron, and phosphorus. The relatively high concentrations of aluminum and iron may be the result of dissolution of secondary amorphous phases that precipitated after a reactive plume partially dissolved aluminum- and iron-bearing phases as it migrated through the sediment column. On the other hand, the presence of elevated concentrations of phosphorous may be the tell-tale signature of wastes derived from the bismuth phosphate separation process. Elements typically mobile in the geosphere, such as technetium-99, are present at either low concentrations or are below ...
Date: December 21, 2007
Creator: Brown, Christopher F.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Um, Wooyong; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Iovin, Cristian et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Direct Push Vadose Zone Sediments from the 241-U Single-Shell Tank Farm

Description: The overall goals of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., are 1) to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities, 2) to identify and evaluate the efficacy of interim measures, and 3) to aid, via collection of geochemical information and data, the future decisions that must be made by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regarding the near-term operations, future waste retrieval, and final closure activities for the single-shell tank Waste Management Areas (WMAs). For a more complete discussion of the goals of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, see the overall work plan, Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas (DOE 1999). Specific details on the rationale for activities performed at WMA U are found in Crumpler (2003). To meet these goals, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to perform detailed analyses of vadose zone sediment collected within the U Single-Shell Tank Farm. Specifically, this report contains all the geochemical and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from ten direct push characterization holes emplaced to investigate vadose zone contamination associated with potential leaks within the 241-U Single-Shell Tank Farm. Specific tanks targeted during this characterization campaign included tanks 241-U-104/241-U-105, 241-U-110, and 241-U-112. Additionally, this report compiles data from direct push samples collected north of tank 241-U-201, as well as sediment collected from the background borehole (C3393). After evaluating all the characterization and analytical data, there is no question that the vadose zone in the vicinity of tanks 241-U-104 and 241-U-105 has been contaminated by tank-related waste. This observation is not new, as gamma logging of drywells in the area has identified uranium contamination at the same depths interrogated by ...
Date: December 20, 2007
Creator: Brown, Christopher F.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Iovin, Cristian et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Sediments from the Soil Desiccation Pilot Test (SDPT) Site in the BC Cribs and Trenches Area

Description: This technical report documents the results of laboratory geochemical and hydrologic measurements of sediments collected from new borehole 299-E13-65 (C7047) and comparison of the results with those of nearby borehole 299-13E-62 (C5923) both drilled in the BC Cribs and Trenches Area. The total and water-leachable concentrations of key contaminants will be used to update contaminant-distribution conceptual models and to provide more data for improving baseline risk predictions and remedial alternative selections. Improved understanding of subsurface conditions and methods to remediate these principal contaminants can be also used to evaluate the application of specific technologies to other contaminants across the Hanford Site.
Date: September 25, 2009
Creator: Um, Wooyong; Truex, Michael J.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Iovin, Cristian; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Chang, Hyun-shik et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department