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Review of Recent Literature Relevant to the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms – Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

Description: A literature search was conducted by using the Web of Science® Databases component of the ISI Web of KnowledgeSM to identify recent articles that would be useful to help assess the potential environmental effects of renewable energy development in the ocean, with emphasis on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish. Several relatively recent general review articles that included possible effects of marine renewable energy devices on marine mammals and seabirds were examined to begin the search process (e.g., Boehlert et al. 2008; Thompson et al. 2008; Simas et al. 2009). From these articles, several general topics of potential environmental effects on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish were derived. These topics were used as the primary search factors. Searches were conducted with reference to the potential effects of offshore wind farms and MHK devices on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish. Additional sources were identified by cross-checking the Web of Science databases for articles that cited the review articles. It also became clear that often the potential effects were offered as hypotheses that often were not supported by the presentation of appropriate documentation. Therefore, the search was refined and focused on trying to obtain the necessary information to support or challenge a proposed potential effect to a specific concern. One of the expressed concerns regarding MHK devices is that placing wave parks in coastal waters could compromise the migration patterns of whales. Disruption of the annual migration of the gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus), which swims at least 30,000 km on its round trip from breeding grounds in Baja California to feeding areas in the Bering Sea, is of particular concern. Among the hypothesized effects on the migrating gray whales are increased predation risk by constricting migration corridor to between array and shore or by forcing the whales to swim into deeper waters, increased ...
Date: September 30, 2011
Creator: Kropp, Roy K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Review of Recent Literature Relevant to the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices; Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms - Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report

Description: A literature search was conducted by using the Web of Science® databases component of the ISI Web of KnowledgeSM to identify recent articles that would be useful to help assess the potential environmental effects of renewable energy development in the ocean, with emphasis on seabirds and fish. Several relatively recent general review articles that included possible effects on seabirds and fish were examined to begin the search process. From these articles, several general topics of potential environmental effects on seabirds and fish were derived. These topics were used as the primary search factors. Additional sources were identified by cross-checking the Web of Science databases for articles that cited the review articles. It also became clear that the potential effects frequently w
Date: January 1, 2013
Creator: Kropp, Roy K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Cumulative Effects of Tidal Freshwater and Estuarine Ecosystem Restoration on Endangered Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River: Final Report

Description: The listing of 13 salmon and steelhead stocks in the Columbia River basin (hereafter collectively referred to as “salmon”) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, has stimulated tidal wetland restoration in the lower 235 kilometers of the Columbia River and estuary for juvenile salmon habitat functions. The purpose of the research reported herein was to evaluate the effect on listed salmon of the restoration effort currently being conducted under the auspices of the federal Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Linking changes in the quality and landscape pattern of tidal wetlands in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) to salmon recovery is a complex problem because of the characteristics of the ecosystem, the salmon, the restoration actions, and available sampling technologies. Therefore, we designed an evidence-based approach to develop, synthesize, and evaluate information to determine early-stage (~10 years) outcomes of the CEERP. We developed an ecosystem conceptual model and from that, a primary hypothesis that habitat restoration activities in the LCRE have a cumulative beneficial effect on juvenile salmon. There are two necessary conditions of the hypothesis: • habitat-based indicators of ecosystem controlling factors, processes, and structures show positive effects from restoration actions, and • fish-based indicators of ecosystem processes and functions show positive effects from restoration actions and habitats undergoing restoration. Our evidence-based approach to evaluate the primary hypothesis incorporated seven lines of evidence, most of which are drawn from the LCRE. The lines of evidence are spatial and temporal synergies, cumulative net ecosystem improvement, estuary-wide meta-analysis, offsite benefits to juvenile salmon, landscape condition evaluation, and evidence-based scoring of global literature. The general methods we used to develop information for the lines of evidence included field measurements, data analyses, modeling, meta-analysis, and reanalysis of previously collected data sets. We identified a set of 12 ancillary ...
Date: December 1, 2013
Creator: Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weitkamp, Laurie A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2011 - FINAL ANNUAL REPORT

Description: The study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the University of Washington (UW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). This research project was initiated in 2007 by the Bonneville Power Administration to investigate critical uncertainties regarding juvenile salmon ecology in shallow tidal freshwater habitats of the lower Columbia River. However, as part of the Washington Memorandum of Agreement, the project was transferred to the USACE in 2010. In transferring from BPA to the USACE, the focus of the tidal freshwater research project shifted from fundamental ecology toward the effectiveness of restoration in the Lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The research is conducted within the Action Agencies Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Data reported herein spans the time period May 2010 to September 2011.
Date: May 31, 2012
Creator: Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Teel, D. J.; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department