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Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop (CSIIRW'11) Proceedings

Description: The energy industry is embarking upon an infrastructure transformation that will result in a national power grid that is more intelligent, robust, resilient, and secure. While the final form will not be known for quite some time, clearly a smarter grid will make better use of information. Whether an electric utility is making real-time adjustments in response to changing load conditions, or commercial and private consumers are making better choices, the timely availability of this information will become increasingly critical. Ultimately, the overall efficiency, reliability, and resilience of the grid is inextricably linked to information. Unfortunately, "the electric power sector is second from the bottom of all major U.S. industries in terms of R&D spending as a percentage of revenue, exceeding only pulp and paper [Amin2011]." Moreover, U.S. officials worry that cyber-spies could use their [demonstrated] access to shut down the grid or take control of power plants during a time of crisis or war [CIO09, WSJ09]. Moreover, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) released the results of a two-year study, The Future of the Electric Grid.
Date: January 1, 2011
Creator: Sheldon, Frederick T; Abercrombie, Robert K & Krings, Axel
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2013 Proceedings of the Eight Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop

Description: Today's cyberspace is a powerful, virtual environment enabled by our global digital infrastructure that provides a bright landscape for commerce, science, education, communication, and government. The future of America's prosperity hinges on rebalancing cyberspace to mitigate threats and maximize benefits, ensuring security and privacy in a constantly changing adversarial environment. Recognizing this great need, we requested original paper submissions in four general areas derived from the Federal Cybersecurity R&D program thrusts: Designed-In-Security (DIS) Builds the capability to design, develop, and evolve high-assurance, software-intensive systems predictably and reliably while effectively managing risk, cost, schedule, quality, and complexity. Tailored Trustworthy Spaces (TTS) Provides flexible, adaptive, distributed trust environments that can support functional and policy requirements arising from a wide spectrum of activities in the face of an evolving range of threats--recognizing the user's context and evolves as the context evolves. Moving Target (MT) Enables us to create, analyze, evaluate, and deploy mechanisms and strategies that are diverse and that continually shift and change over time to increase complexity and cost for attackers, limit the exposure of vulnerabilities and opportunities for attack, and increase system resiliency. Cyber Economic Incentives (CEI) Develops effective incentives to make cybersecurity ubiquitous, including incentives affecting individuals and organizations.
Date: January 2013
Creator: Sheldon, Frederick T.; Giani, Annarita N.; Krings, Axel & Abercrombie, Robert K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proceedings of the 4th Annual Workshop on Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research: Developing Strategies To Meet The Cyber Security And Information Intelligence Challenges Ahead

Description: As our dependence on the cyber infrastructure grows ever larger, more complex and more distributed, the systems that compose it become more prone to failures and/or exploitation. Intelligence is information valued for its currency and relevance rather than its detail or accuracy. Information explosion describes the pervasive abundance of (public/private) information and the effects of such. Gathering, analyzing, and making use of information constitutes a business- / sociopolitical- / military-intelligence gathering activity and ultimately poses significant advantages and liabilities to the survivability of "our" society. The combination of increased vulnerability, increased stakes and increased threats make cyber security and information intelligence (CSII) one of the most important emerging challenges in the evolution of modern cyberspace "mechanization." The goal of the workshop was to challenge, establish and debate a far-reaching agenda that broadly and comprehensively outlined a strategy for cyber security and information intelligence that is founded on sound principles and technologies. We aimed to discuss novel theoretical and applied research focused on different aspects of software security/dependability, as software is at the heart of the cyber infrastructure.
Date: January 1, 2008
Creator: Sheldon, Frederick T; Krings, Axel; Abercrombie, Robert K & Mili, Ali
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proceedings of the 6th Annual Workshop on Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research: Cyber security and information intelligence challenges and strategies

Description: As our dependence on the cyber infrastructure grows more complex and more distributed, the systems that compose it become more prone to failures and exploitation. Intelligence refers to discrete or private information, which possess currency and relevance. The ability to abstract, evaluate, and understand such information underlies its accuracy and true value. The collection, analysis and utilization of information constitutes a business-, sociopolitical-, military-intelligence activity that ultimately poses significant advantages and liabilities to the survivability of "our" society. The aim of this workshop (www.csiir.ornl.gov/csiirw) was to discuss (and publish) novel theoretical and empirical research focused on the many different aspects of cyber security and information intelligence. The scope will vary from methodologies and tools to systems and applications to more precise definition of the various problems and impacts. Topics include: Scalable trustworthy systems Enterprise-level metrics Coping with insider and life-cycle threats Coping with malware and polymorphism Phishing/whaling, spam and cyber crime High assurance system survivability Cyber security for the Smart Grid Digital provenance and data integrity Privacy-aware security and usable security Social networking models for managing trust and security A principle goal of the workshop was to foster discussions and dialog among the 150 registered attendees from North America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. This goal was initiated and facilitated by 14 plenary keynote addresses including a banquet presentation and the CIO / CTO perspectives panel. A total of 98 papers (i.e., extended abstracts [EAs]) were submitted and 54 EAs were accepted plus 11 posters were invited. All of the abstracts and either presentation materials or posters are included in the proceedings. The subject areas span the topics above and were organized into eight tracks: Trust, Design, Malware, Network, Privacy and Metrics, Enterprise, Survivability and Formal Methods.
Date: January 1, 2010
Creator: Sheldon, Frederick T; Prowell, Stacy J; Krings, Axel & Abercrombie, Robert K
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proceedings of the 7th Annual Workshop on Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research: Energy Infrastructure Cyber Protection

Description: The energy industry is embarking upon an infrastructure transformation that will result in a national power grid that is more intelligent, robust, resilient, and secure. While the final form will not be known for quite some time, clearly a smarter grid will make better use of information. Whether an electric utility is making real-time adjustments in response to changing load conditions, or commercial and private consumers are making better choices, the timely availability of this information will become increasingly critical. Ultimately, the overall efficiency, reliability, and resilience of the grid is inextricably linked to information. Unfortunately, "the electric power sector is second from the bottom of all major U.S. industries in terms of R&D spending as a percentage of revenue, exceeding only pulp and paper [Amin2011]." Moreover, U.S. officials worry that cyber-spies could use their [demonstrated] access to shut down the grid or take control of power plants during a time of crisis or war [CIO09, WSJ09]. Protecting and trusting information is not unique to the grid. Indeed, the information security market is worth tens of billions of dollars, almost exclusively in cyber security products and services. Yet, solutions designed for the Internet are often not appropriate for securing the energy grid, which has a different set of priorities and communication needs. Any viable information security solution must address those unique challenges and features. The discussion at the CSIIR Workshop was primarily focused about the Energy Infrastructure Cyber Protection (ENCyP) Initiative. ENCyP is a multidisciplinary strategic theme oriented on cyber protection for the most critical and most vulnerable components of Energy Delivery System (EDS). The initiative derived from ORNL's focus on energy and cyber-physical defenses. On this basis we received just over 100 submissions stemming from both novel theoretical and empirical research focused on the many different aspects of ENCyP. ...
Date: January 1, 2011
Creator: Sheldon, Frederick T; Abercrombie, Robert K & Krings, Axel
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proceedings of the 5th Annual Workshop on Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research: Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Challenges and Strategies

Description: Our reliance on the cyber infrastructure has further grown and the dependencies have become more complex. The infrastructure and applications running on it are not generally governed by the rules of bounded systems and inherit the properties of unbounded systems, such as the absence of global control, borders and barriers. Furthermore, the quest for increasing functionality and ease of operation is often at the cost of controllability, potentially opening up avenues for exploitation and failures. Intelligence is information valued for its currency and relevance rather than its detail or accuracy. In the presence of information explosion, i.e., the pervasive abundance of (public/private) information and the effects of such, intelligence has the potential to shift the advantages in the dynamic game of defense and attacks in cyber space. Gathering, analyzing, and making use of information constitutes a business-/sociopolitical-/military-intelligence gathering activity and ultimately poses significant advantages and liabilities to the survivability of "our" society. The combination of increased vulnerability, increased stakes and increased threats make cyber security and information intelligence (CSII) one of the most important emerging challenges in the evolution of modern cyberspace. The goal of the workshop is to establish, debate and challenge the far-reaching agenda that broadly and comprehensively outlines a strategy for cyber security and information intelligence that is founded on sound principles and technologies.
Date: January 1, 2009
Creator: Sheldon, Frederick T; Peterson, Greg D; Krings, Axel; Abercrombie, Robert K & Mili, Ali
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

First-Generation Hybrid Compact Compton Imager

Description: At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are pursuing the development of a gamma-ray imaging system using the Compton effect. We have built our first generation hybrid Compton imaging system, and we have conducted initial calibration and image measurements using this system. In this paper, we present the details of the hybrid Compton imaging system and initial calibration and image measurements.
Date: November 7, 2005
Creator: Cunningham, M; Burks, M; Chivers, D; Cork, C; Fabris, L; Gunter, D et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department