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Artificial cooling of the Columbia River by dam regulation, 1961

Description: This report details benefits of an increase in the flow of water from the lower depths of Grand Coulee Reservoir which used to lower river temperatures at HAPO. A net average daily reduction of over 1.7{degree}C resulted at HAPO. The peak reduction was over 4.0{degree}C. The net production gain from temperature change was 13,350 MWD. The cost of control was: Grand Coulee Charges (Estimated) $37,000, and other 3,500, for a total of $40,500.
Date: June 15, 1962
Creator: Kramer, H. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Historical record of data on flood control

Description: Last year (1948) during the flood period the flow at Grand Coulee fluctuated widely. 2 PM, June 8, 543000 c.f.s.; 4 AM, June 9, 568000 c.f s.; 2 PM, June 9, 543000 c.f.s.; 2 AM, June 10, 573000 c.f.s. A total instantaneous fluctuations of 37,500 c.f.s. was reported. Now there is installed a new control. This control can keep downstream variation within 500 c.f.s. By lowering the lake level prior to the crest period, the drum gates could be used as flood control (1948 high water basis) the drum … more
Date: May 19, 1959
Creator: Kramer, H. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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A compilation of water temperatures near Grand Coulee Dam and in environs of Lake Roosevelt

Description: This tabulation of data collected since 1952 by the author was made in response to a request by the Atomic Energy Commission. It is understood it is to be transmitted to the Bureau of Reclamation for their information. The data are to afford basic information to support the Bureau`s decision in regard to a third power house at Grand Coulee Dam.
Date: January 31, 1962
Creator: Kramer, H. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Priest Rapids Dam flow curtailment: Incident report, January 7, 1961

Description: This incident report deals with mechanical damage (caused by falling rocks) to the power line supplying station power, Priest Rapids Dam lost all generating flow at 4:23 p.m., cutting discharge from 71,700 cfs to about 12,000 cfs. Within five minutes, spillway gates were opened, bringing river flow back to greater than 36,000 cfs in about 10 minutes. The flow at 181-B dropped from 72,000 cfs to a minimum of 56,000 cfs at about 5:25 p.m. Priest Rapids generators returned to service at 4:45 p.m.,… more
Date: January 20, 1961
Creator: Kramer, H. A. & Corley, J. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Artificial cooling of the Columbia River by dam regulation: Part 1

Description: In early July 1958, it appeared that Columbia River temperatures at HAPO would be near 24--50{degree}C by the end of August. River temperatures were averaging 40 to 50{degree}C above 1957 figures and were 3{degree} to 4{degree} above the ten year highs. It seemed desirable to examine the problem to determine if any corrective measure could be taken, since it was apparent that production losses were imminent. The large storage of cold water behind Grand Coulee Dam, normally untapped, was a sourc… more
Date: May 25, 1959
Creator: Kramer, H. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Artificial cooling of the Columbia River by dam regulation, 1960

Description: This report discusses benefits in an increase in the flow of water from the lower depths of the Grand Coulee Dam which was used to lower river temperature at HAPO. A net average daily reduction of over 1.2{degree}C resulted at HAPO with a peak of 2.7{degree}C. The Net Production gain from temperature change was 6910 MWD and the Cost of Control was: Grand Coulee Charges $3,120.00, and other (Estimated) 6,880.00 for a total of $10,00.00.
Date: February 15, 1961
Creator: Kramer, H. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Artificial cooling of the Columbia River by dam regulation 1959

Description: An increase in the flow of water from the lower depths of the Grand Coulee Reservoir was used to lower the river temperature at Hanford Atomic Products Operation (HAPO). A net average daily reduction of over 1 C resulted. The average for one day varied from 1.7 to 0.2 C. Before the dam control period, the Bonneville Power Administration transferred load from Grand Coulee Dam to other dams in order to conserve cold water. The authors calculate that there was more value to HAPO from this transfer… more
Date: June 24, 1960
Creator: Kramer, H. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Artificial cooling of the Columbia River by dam regulation. Part 3

Description: The temperatures of the Columbia River was reduced 1 to 30 Centigrade with beneficial effects at HAPO. It is reasonable to expect that future benefits may be possible. It is desirable that the temperature of the river be controlled each year to the maximum extent possible. Instrumentation improvements requested to effect optimum savings. Records of river temperatures and flows should continue to be maintained by IPD as a necessary part of temperature optimization. Where possible, the coincident… more
Date: May 25, 1959
Creator: Kramer, H. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Study of the effects of a disaster at Grand Coulee Dam upon the Hanford Works

Description: Declassified 23 Nov 1973. It is assumed that the Grand Coulee Dam would be destroyed by one direct hit following detonation of an atomic bomb. Major effects of the explosion include flooding and isolation of Richland, flooding of Midway Substation, and flooding of surrounding areas. Maximum water elevations following a direct hit and indirect hits are estimated. Data are presented for flow through openings and flow through dam failure. (HLW)
Date: February 1, 1950
Creator: Kramer, H. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Artificial Cooling of the Columbia River By Dam Regulation Part 1

Description: In early July, 1958, it appeared that Columbia River temperature at HAPO would be near 24.5ºC by the end of August. River temperature were averaging 4º to 5º above 1957 figures and were 3º to 4º above the ten year highs. It seemed desirable to examine the problem to determine if any corrective measure could be taken, since it was apparent that production losses were imminent.
Date: May 25, 1959
Creator: Kramer, H. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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