42 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Effect of Scratches on Pinch Welds

Description: Fill stems for tritium reservoirs have stringent scratch requirements such that any indications that appear to have depth are cause for rework or rejection. A scoping study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of scratches approximately 0.0015 to 0.002 inch deep on the fitness for service and bond quality. The stems were characterized using borescope before and after welding. The four stems were welded with near optimal weld parameters, proof tested, and examined metallographically. The stems were radiographed, proof tested, and examined metallographically. The scratches did not adversely affect (1) the weld integrity based on radiography, (2) the ability to withstand the proof pressure, and (3) the weld quality based on metallographic cross-sections. Based on these limited results at a nominal weld current, the weld process is very robust. It may be able to recover from manufacturing defects and inspection anomalies worse than those expected for typical fill stem manufacturing processes; additional testing specific to each application over a range of weld heats is needed to verify applicability of these results.
Date: October 11, 2005
Creator: Korinko, P
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

COMPARISON OF AIR AND DEUTERIUM ON PINCH WELD BOND APPEARANCE

Description: The effect that air and deuterium internal atmospheres have on the pinch weld bond quality was evaluated by conducting a scoping study using type 304L stainless steel LF-7 test stems that were fabricated for an associated study. Welds were made under cool, yet nominal conditions to exacerbate the influence of the atmosphere. The bond quality of the welds was directly related to the internal atmosphere with the air atmosphere welds being of lower quality than the deuterium atmosphere welds for nominally identical welding conditions.
Date: October 11, 2005
Creator: Korinko, P
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Internal Brushing on Pinch Weld Quality

Description: Post machining operations such as borescope inspection can cause linear indications down the length of the bore of fill stems. Often these indications are removed or obscured using rotary wire brushing. This study evaluated the effect this mechanical operation may have on pinch weld quality when relatively cold welds were made. A total of four stems with two levels of brushing of both Type 304L and 21-6-9 stainless steels were tested. In addition, two each of the Type 304L stems were Nitradd cleaned and the other two were aqueously cleaned; all four 21-6-9 stems were aqueously cleaned. All of the brushed stem areas exhibited more surface anomalies based on borescope evaluation. On average, the bond rating was a higher value (worse) for the brushed areas than the unadulterated areas for both Type 304L and 21-6-9 stems. The test method used may have biased the results towards a lesser quality bond for the brushed areas so additional testing is recommended.
Date: December 1, 2005
Creator: Korinko, P
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EFFECTIVENESS OF COPPER AND BRONZE FOR ZINC CAPTURE

Description: A series of experiments was conducted to determine the efficacy of using copper and bronze sheet and screen under high vacuum conditions to capture zinc vapor. The experiments were conducted in a parametric manner using a fixed zinc vaporization temperature (350°C) but varying the filter temperature from ambient to 550°C. Consistent with previous work, metallic zinc was deposited at low temperatures, but the deposit was non‐adherent. At an intermediate temperature range (350‐450°C), the deposit formed an alloy with both copper and bronze materials. At higher temperatures (> 500°C) the zinc did not deposit on the surfaces likely due to its high vapor pressure. Additional testing to optimize the zinc 'getter' chemistry and surface condition is warranted.
Date: November 2, 2012
Creator: Korinko, P. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DYNAMIC MECHANICAL ANALYSIS CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

Description: As part of the characterization of various glovebox glove material from four vendors, the permeability of gas through each type as a function of temperature was determined and a discontinuity in the permeability with temperature was revealed. A series of tests to determine the viscoelastic properties of the glove materials as a function of temperature using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was initiated. The glass transition temperature and the elastic and viscoelastic properties as a function of temperature up to maximum use temperature were determined for each glove material. The glass transition temperatures of the gloves were -60 C for butyl, -30 C for polyurethane, -16 C Hypalon{reg_sign}, - 16 C for Viton{reg_sign}, and -24 C for polyurethane-Hypalon{reg_sign}. The glass transition was too complex for the butyl-Hypalon{reg_sign} and butyl-Viton{reg_sign} composite gloves to be characterized by a single glass transition temperature. All of the glass transition temperatures exceed the vendor projected use temperatures.
Date: February 29, 2012
Creator: Korinko, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EFFECT OF PORE SIZE ON TRAPPING ZINC VAPORS

Description: A series of experiments were conducted to determine the effect of pore size on pumping efficiency and zinc vapor trapping efficiency. A simple pumping efficiency test was conducted for all five pore diameters where it was observed that evacuation times were adversely affected by reducing the pore size below 5 {micro}m. Common test conditions for the zinc trapping efficiency experiments were used. These conditions resulted in some variability, to ascribe different efficiencies to the filter media. However, the data suggest that there is no significant difference in trapping efficiency for filter media with pores from 0.2 to 20 {micro}m with a thickness of 0.065-inch. Consequently, the 20 {micro}m pore filter media that is currently used at SRS is a suitable filter material for to utilize for future extractions. There is evidence that smaller pore filter will adversely affect the pumping times for the TEF and little evidence to suggest that a smaller pore diameters have significant impact on the trapping efficiency.
Date: December 17, 2010
Creator: Korinko, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EFFECT OF FILTER TEMPERATURE ON TRAPPING ZINC VAPOR

Description: To address the {sup 65}Zn contamination issue in the TEF, a multi-task experimental program was initiated. The first experimental task was completed and is reported in Ref. 1. The results of the second experimental task are reported here. This task examined the effect of filter temperature on trapping efficiency and deposit morphology. Based on the first experimental tasks that examined filter pore size and trapping efficiency, stainless steel filter media with a 20 {micro}m pore size was selected. A series of experiments using these filters was conducted during this second task to determine the effect of filter temperature on zinc vapor trapping efficiency, adhesion and morphology. The tests were conducted with the filters heated to 60, 120, and 200 C; the zinc source material was heated to 400 C for all the experiments to provide a consistent zinc source. The samples were evaluated for mass change, deposit adhesion and morphology. As expected from the physical vapor deposition literature, a difference in deposit morphology and appearance was observed between the three filter temperatures. The filter held at 60 C had the largest average mass gain while the 120 and 200 C filters exhibited similar but lower weight gains. The standard deviations were large and suggest that all three temperatures exhibited comparable gains. No zinc was detected on the backside surface of the filters indicating high efficiency for front and internal trapping. A zinc rich deposit was formed on the surface of the 60 C filter. Based on a simple tape adhesion test, the surface zinc was readily removed from the 60 C filter while less zinc deposit was removed from the 120 and 200 C filter samples. It is surmised that the higher temperatures enable the zinc to deposit within the filter media rather than on the surface. Based on the ...
Date: March 25, 2011
Creator: Korinko, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EVALUATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES FOR EFFECTIVE PERMEATION CONTROL

Description: A research and development task was undertaken to determine the permeabilities of hydrogen and dry air through different polymeric glove materials that are used to maintain the integrity of glovebox secondary containment. Fifteen different glove samples were obtained from four different manufacturers and samples cut from these gloves were tested. The gloves included baseline butyl rubber, Viton{reg_sign}, Dupont{reg_sign} Hypalon{reg_sign}, polyurethane, as well as composite gloves. The testing indicated that all of the vendor's butyl rubber gloves and the Jung Viton{reg_sign} gloves performed comparably in both gases.
Date: February 29, 2012
Creator: Korinko, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

Description: A task was undertaken to characterize glovebox gloves that are currently used in the facilities at Savannah River Site (SRS) as well as some experimental and advanced compound gloves that have been proposed for use. Gloves from four manufacturers were tested for permeation in hydrogen and air, thermal stability, tensile properties, puncture resistance and dynamic mechanical response. The gloves were compared to each other within the type and also to the butyl rubber glove that is widely used at the SRS. The permeation testing demonstrated that the butyl compounds from three of the vendors behaved similarly and exhibited hydrogen permeabilities of .52‐.84 x10{sup ‐7} cc H{sub 2}*cm / (cm{sup 2}*atm). The Viton� glove performed at the lower edge of this bound, while the more advanced composite gloves exhibited permeabilities greater than a factor of two compared to butyl. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to determine the amount of material lost under slightly aggressive conditions. Glove losses are important since they can affect the life of glovebox stripper systems. During testing at 90, 120, and 150�C, the samples lost most of the mass in the initial 60 minutes of thermal exposure and as expected increasing the temperature increased the mass loss and shortened the time to achieve a steady state loss. The ranking from worst to best was Jung butyl‐Hypalon� with 12.9 %, Piercan Hypalon� with 11.4 %, and Jung butyl‐Viton� with 5.2% mass loss all at approximately 140�C. The smallest mass losses were experienced by the Jung Viton� and the Piercan polyurethane. Tensile properties were measured using a standard dog bone style test. The butyl rubber exhibited tensile strengths of 11‐15 MPa and elongations or 660‐843%. Gloves made from other compounds exhibited lower tensile strengths (5 MPa Viton) to much higher tensile strengths (49 MPa Urethane) with a comparable range of ...
Date: January 24, 2013
Creator: Korinko, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PRELIMINARY STUDY OF METHODS TO CHEMICALLY BIND ZINC

Description: To address the {sup 65}Zn contamination issue in the TEF, a multi-task experimental program was initiated. The first two experimental tasks were completed. The results of the third experimental task are reported here. This task was conducted to determine if the zinc vapors could be chemically bound on two non hydrogen active substrates. Based on a thermodynamic study copper and cobalt were the most favorable for capturing zinc without forming hydrides. Within the experimental parameters tested, which include temperatures of 350, 400, and 450 C at pressures of nominally 20-40 millitorr, the zinc deposited on the both copper screen and cobalt rods but did not react to form a compound. The conditions that were tested are not prototypic and additional testing under higher vacuum conditions, i.e., .01 millitorr, may enhance the reactivity of the surfaces and is recommended.
Date: June 10, 2011
Creator: Korinko, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

REVIEW OF PLUTONIUM OXIDATION LITERATURE

Description: A brief review of plutonium oxidation literature was conducted. The purpose of the review was to ascertain the effect of oxidation conditions on oxide morphology to support the design and operation of the PDCF direct metal oxidation (DMO) furnace. The interest in the review was due to a new furnace design that resulted in oxide characteristics that are different than those of the original furnace. Very little of the published literature is directly relevant to the DMO furnace operation, which makes assimilation of the literature data with operating conditions and data a convoluted task. The oxidation behavior can be distilled into three regimes, a low temperature regime (RT to 350 C) with a relatively slow oxidation rate that is influenced by moisture, a moderate temperature regime (350-450 C) that is temperature dependent and relies on more or less conventional oxidation growth of a partially protective oxide scale, and high temperature oxidation (> 500 C) where the metal autocatalytically combusts and oxidizes. The particle sizes obtained from these three regimes vary with the finest being from the lowest temperature. It is surmised that the slow growth rate permits significant stress levels to be achieved that help break up the oxides. The intermediate temperatures result in a fairly compact scale that is partially protective and that grows to critical thickness prior to fracturing. The growth rate in this regime may be parabolic or paralinear, depending on the oxidation time and consequently the oxide thickness. The high temperature oxidation is invariant in quiescent or nearly quiescent conditions due to gas blanketing while it accelerates with temperature under flowing conditions. The oxide morphology will generally consist of fine particles (<15 {micro}m), moderately sized particles (15 < x < 250 {micro}m) and large particles (> 250 {micro}m). The particle size ratio is expected to be ...
Date: November 12, 2009
Creator: Korinko, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

TRANSPORT AND REDUCTION POSSIBILITIES DURING TPBAR EXTRACTION

Description: In light of the discovery of the activated zinc 65 in the TEF process piping, a discussion of potential sources and mechanisms for the production of this species has been initiated. A suspected source is the presence of Cu as a contaminant in many of the alloy components that comprise the TPBARs and the presence of Zn as a contaminant in the aluminide coating. These two sources are expected to produce metallic transmutation products that could be mobile and be extracted from the metallic components of the TPBARs. Another potential source is the presence of ZnO that is present as part of the crud on the external surfaces of the TPBARs. In addition, it is conceivable to have ZnO within the TPBARs from transmutation products and subsequent oxidation reactions with water. This memo does not attempt to address all of the possible sources, nor does it derive the most likely scenarios as to how Zn or ZnO may be present in the TPBARs it merely posits that it is present as a transmutation product and if present, elementally, it may be mobile under high vacuum conditions at high temperatures as indicated by the pressure temperature curve shown in Fig. 1. Further, this document shows that it is thermodynamically feasible to reduce ZnO to Zn by solid state reactions of the ZnO with other metallic components in the TPBARs. However, for these reactions to occur, the ZnO must be in contact with the more active metal so that the chemical reactions can occur. The proposed reactions are based on equilibrium thermodynamics. For simplicity, they do not take into account the quantities of the various materials, the compositions, the effect of alloying, or other technical issues, they are intended only to provide feasibility for the reduction reactions. A more complete thermodynamic model ...
Date: May 19, 2008
Creator: Korinko, P
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SUMMARY REPORT FOR ZINC 65 CONTAMINATION CONTROL

Description: Radioactive zinc, {sup 65}Zn, was detected after extraction of 215 TPBARs in from TVA reactor fuel cycle 6. A team consisting of Tritium Engineering, Tritium Operations, Tritium Radiation Control, and Savannah River National Laboratory personnel evaluated the risk and response and developed short, medium and long term goals for contamination control. One of the goals was incorporated into site Performance Based Incentive CO 3.4, to optimize the filter geometry and operating conditions for the Tritium Extraction Facility. This goal included a scoping study to determine if the contamination could be contained within the high radiation environment of the furnace module as well. In order to optimize the filters studies were conducted to independently evaluate the effect of pore size on pumping efficiency and zinc trapping efficiency (1). A study was also conducted to evaluate the effect of temperature on the trapping efficiency and adhesion (2). In addition, the potential for chemically trapping zinc in the lithium trap was evaluated using a thermodynamic study (3) followed by preliminary experimental testing (4). Based on the work that was completed it is determined that a 20 {mu}m filter heated to between 120 and 200 C will act as an effective physical trap for zinc vapors. It may be possible to chemically react zinc with copper or cobalt to form zinc intermetallic compounds or alloys but additional work under more prototypic conditions are required.
Date: July 14, 2011
Creator: Korinko, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

GLOVEBOX GLOVE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY

Description: A task was undertaken to determine primarily the permeation behavior of various glove compounds from four manufacturers. As part of the basic characterization task, the opportunity to obtain additional mechanical and thermal properties presented itself. Consequently, a total of fifteen gloves were characterized for permeation, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Puncture Resistance, Tensile Properties and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis. Detailed reports were written for each characterization technique used. This report contains the summary of the results.
Date: May 14, 2012
Creator: Korinko, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ZINC MITIGATION INTERIM REPORT - THERMODYNAMIC STUDY

Description: An experimental program was initiated in order to develop and validate conditions that will effectively trap Zn vapors that are released during extraction. The proposed work is broken down into three tasks. The first task is to determine the effectiveness of various pore sizes of filter elements. The second task is to determine the effect of filter temperature on zinc vapor deposition. The final task is to determine whether the zinc vapors can be chemically bound. The approach for chemically binding the zinc vapors has two subtasks, the first is a review of literature and thermodynamic calculations and the second is an experimental approach using the best candidates. This report details the results of the thermodynamic calculations to determine feasibility of chemically binding the zinc vapors within the furnace module, specifically the lithium trap (1). A review of phase diagrams, literature, and thermodynamic calculations was conducted to determine if there are suitable materials to capture zinc vapor within the lithium trap of the extraction basket. While numerous elements exist that form compounds with zinc, many of these also form compounds with hydrogen or the water that is present in the TPBARs. This relatively comprehensive review of available data indicates that elemental cobalt and copper and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) may have the requisite properties to capture zinc and yet not be adversely affected by the extraction gases and should be considered for testing.
Date: December 17, 2010
Creator: Korinko, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

THERMOGRAVIMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

Description: An experimental project was initiated to characterize mass loss when heating different polymer glovebox glove material samples to three elevated temperatures, 90, 120, and 150 C. Samples from ten different polymeric gloves that are being considered for use in the tritium gloveboxes were tested. The intent of the study was to determine the amount of material lost. These data will be used in a subsequent study to characterize the composition of the material lost. One goal of the study was to determine which glove composition would least affect the glovebox atmosphere stripper system. Samples lost most of the mass in the initial 60 minutes of thermal exposure and as expected increasing the temperature increased the mass loss and shortened the time to achieve a steady state loss. The most mass loss was experienced by Jung butyl-Hypalon{reg_sign} at 146 C with 12.9% mass loss followed by Piercan Hypalon{reg_sign} at 144 C with 11.4 % mass loss and Jung butyl-Viton{reg_sign} at 140 C with 5.2% mass loss. The least mass loss was experienced by the Jung Viton{reg_sign} and the Piercan polyurethane. Unlike the permeation testing (1) the vendor and fabrication route influences the amount of gaseous species that is evolved. Additional testing to characterize these products is recommended. Savannah River Site (SRS) has many gloveboxes deployed in the Tritium Facility. These gloveboxes are used to protect the workers and to ensure a suitable environment in which to handle tritium gas products. The gas atmosphere in the gloveboxes is purified using a stripper system. The process gas strippers collect molecules that may have hydrogen or its isotopes attached, e.g., waters of hydration, acids, etc. Recently, sulfur containing compounds were detected in the stripper system and the presence of these compounds accelerates the stripper system's aging process. This accelerated aging requires the strippers to ...
Date: February 29, 2012
Creator: Korinko, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal analysis of RFETS SS and C

Description: In support of the gas generation test program (GGTP) for the 9975 shipping container, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was conducted. The objective of this activity was to determine the moisture content as an input to the gas generation model.
Date: February 4, 2000
Creator: Korinko, P.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Permeation Barrier Coatings for the Helical Heat Exchanger

Description: A permeation barrier coating was specified for the Helical Heat Exchanger (HHE) to minimize contamination through emissions and/or permeation into the nitrogen system for ALARA reasons. Due to the geometry of the HHE, a special coating practice was needed since the conventional method of high temperature pack aluminization was intractable. A survey of many coating companies was undertaken; their coating capabilities and technologies were assessed and compared to WSRC needs. The processes and limitations to coating the HHE are described. Slurry coating appears to be the most technically sound approach for coating the HHE.
Date: May 26, 1999
Creator: Korinko, P.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Heat Shields from RTS Wright Industries Magnesium and Uranium Beds

Description: Heat shields from a factory test of the furnaces that will be used to heat the magnesium and uranium beds for the tritium extraction facility (TEF) were examined to determine the cause of discoloration. The samples were examined using visual, optical microscopy, electron microscopy, x-ray spectroscopy, and Auger electron spectroscopy.
Date: October 29, 2002
Creator: Korinko, P.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Innovative Flash Control in Inertia Welding

Description: Inertia welding is widely used to join cylindrically shaped objects such as disks and shafts in turbine engines, turbochargers, etc. Flash control in many of these applications is not critical because the excess material is on external surfaces and can readily be removed by machining. Internal flash on hollow vessels, however, may be difficult or impossible to remove and may be either controlled by the use of flash traps or the part can be used as welded. Both internal flash and flash traps reduce internal volume and the conditions are not always acceptable. To address this short-coming, several innovative methods have been tested to determine their effect on flash control in inertia welding of hollow vessels. The methods include introduction of high pressure inert gas and incorporation of an expendable mandrel to divert the flash. Both gas and internal mandrels appear promising methods for diverting flash.
Date: April 25, 2003
Creator: Korinko, P.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ALTERNATIVE MATERIALS TO PD MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PURIFICATION

Description: Development of advanced hydrogen separation membranes in support of hydrogen production processes such as coal gasification and as front end gas purifiers for fuel cell based system is paramount to the successful implementation of a national hydrogen economy. Current generation metallic hydrogen separation membranes are based on Pd-alloys. Although the technology has proven successful, at issue is the high cost of palladium. Evaluation of non-noble metal based dense metallic separation membranes is currently receiving national and international attention. The focal point of the reported work was to evaluate two different classes of materials for potential replacement of conventional Pd-alloy purification/diffuser membranes. Crystalline V-Ni-Ti and Amorphous Fe- and Co-based metallic glass alloys have been evaluated using gaseous hydrogen permeation testing techniques.
Date: September 12, 2008
Creator: Korinko, P & Adams, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PINCH WELD TESTING TO SUPPORT CHANGE IN MANUFACTURING OIL AT THE KCP

Description: This task supports the change from an oil mixture termed 50:50 oil (an equal parts mixture of Milpro 634 and Pennex N47) to a new oil mixture (Castrol Illocut 334). This change was necessitated by a KCP vendor no longer supplying the Pennex N47 component of the 50-50. In order to continue production of machined parts, a detailed process was followed to ensure that high quality parts could be manufactured and that the cutting oil selected would provide acceptable human performance characteristics, e.g., skin irritability, smell, etc. A prime consideration in changing the oil was that no apparent change in the pinch weldability of the fill stems fabricated using the new oil and process parameters, if any, be observed. A two part approach, as detailed in the plan shown in Appendix B, was used to qualify the effect of the process on pinch weld characteristics. In the first phase, ref. 1., the weld parameter window was defined using fill stems made from 304L, 21-6-9, and 316 stainless steel. These weld conditions were then subsequently used for the Castrol Illocut 334 machined fill stems. The results of this activity are reported in this document. A follow-on task of welding in the facility was requested by one of the design agencies and this will be completed and reported separately.
Date: February 28, 2008
Creator: Korinko, P & David Maxwell, D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department