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open access

The Impact of Cognitive Styles on Different Stages of Knowledge Management Cycle

Description: While explicit knowledge can be to some extent separated from human brain and stored in organizational memory, tacit knowledge cannot be detached from the individuals who possess it, therefore its management cannot rely primarily on technologies. This calls for knowledge-worker centered approach. Individuals with different cognitive styles process information differently and use a variety of reasoning patterns for decision making and building their personal knowledge bases. The paper overviews the potential applications of the construct of cognitive style to managerial practice in knowledge intensive organizations. It also presents a model that can help visualize the relationships between different cognitive styles and knowledge management processes. The model also demonstrates how such cognitive dimensions manifest themselves at different stages of KM cycle.
Date: December 2020
Creator: Pluzhenskaya, Marina
Partner: UNT College of Information

Knowledge Management in the Technical Information Center/Library of a Navy Lab and as a Whole, as well as Metrics to Measure the Scientific Health of a R&D Center

Description: In order to perform research data triangulation, there were three main sources of data: 1. External/Internal Survey of 15 Library Directors (5 in the Navy; 10 from Government/Universities), 2. Literature Review/Industry Best Practices, and 3. Navy Lab Interviews (Ten) . The results include "Harvest” the personal collections of classified and other materials (reach out to the end users to put documents in library repository); Need to modernize our workflow; Having research material that can be easily accessed for desktops; Need to share information and knowledge; Focus on the needs of your community and evolve with those needs.
Date: December 2020
Creator: Liebowitz, Jay
Partner: UNT College of Information

Mitigating Usability Issues in Legacy EHR Systems to Improve Patient Safety: A Learning Health System Approach

Description: This paper describes an on-going research project examining currently used processes in both hospitals and EHR vendor companies for identifying, prioritizing, and mitigating electronic health record (EHR) software issues, and usability issues, that may compromise patient safety as they arise in the implemented or legacy EHR system. This on-going project includes 3 interviews with CMIOs at hospitals and 3 interviews with EHR vendors. Next steps include surveying both groups. The project can be considered as part of a learning health system (LHS) approach in that it seeks to identify best practices in terms of the process for addressing these EHR issues. The LHS approach seeks to improve long term outcomes in health care by identifying optimal delivery processes and to do so in a systematic, rather than a haphazard way. (Friedman & Rigby, 2013).
Date: December 2020
Creator: Meehan, Rebecca
Partner: UNT College of Information
open access

Social Media, Grindr, and PrEP: Sexual Health Literacy for Men Who have Sex with Men in the Internet Age

Description: Despite continued improvements to HIV/AIDS treatment and awareness, HIV transmission rates remain high among men who have sex with men (MSM). Online consumer health information targeting high risk MSM through social media and geosocial networking (GSN) apps have shown to be successful HIV intervention strategies. This review article addresses (1) the efficacy and acceptance of delivering consumer health information about pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and HIV prevention through GSN apps, (2) the impact of online and social media communities in the discussion and delivery of information about PrEP and HIV interventions, and (3) on-going and possible future research and the role of information professionals.
Date: December 2020
Creator: Goodwin, Gavin
Partner: UNT College of Information
open access

Knowledge Management Based Best Practices of Higher Educational Institutes

Description: Knowledge Management Best Practices are established through leveraged Data Science Technique based on results found on published articles of reputed literature and both advertisements and news items of newspapers. Further, the recognition showed threats to the values of Higher Education such as the quality of courses. As such, a Postgraduate study is conducted to reveal a solution to those kinds of issues in Higher Education. Consequently, based on the proposal of literature to such issues in other contexts, existences of Knowledge Management Practices are revealed in the qualitative paradigm. Meanwhile, the present study questioned whether the confirmed Practices of the Postgraduate study are Best Practices of Higher Educational Institutes. Besides, the Oxford dictionary specifies that practice becomes Best Practice if “commercial or professional procedures that are accepted or prescribed as being correct or most effective”. Accordingly, confirmed practices of Higher Educational Institutes became Best Practices due to the practices that are accepted by the industry of the Postgraduate research through a qualitative paradigm and by the other industries of researches that those reputed publications concerned into the Postgraduate study. Besides, Knowledge Management is an emerging/ emerged era. As such, present research proposes resulting practices of the Postgraduate study as Based Best Practices of Higher Educational Institutes.
Date: December 2020
Creator: Jeyarajan, S.
Partner: UNT College of Information
open access

Role of Social Media in Spreading Fake News During COVID-19 Pandemic: A Survey among University Students of Bangladesh

Description: Arising in China in December 2019, the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) soon spread to other countries worldwide including Bangladesh. Mass media and social media platforms played an important role in providing Coronavirus related information and news as they enable people to share news as well as personal experiences with one another rapidly. Since little is known about COVID-19, various fake news spread across social media that panicked people into making panic decisions. The primary objective of this study is to examine how social media is spreading fake or unauthentic news during the time of COVID-19 pandemic. This study also focuses on how the university students of Bangladesh are playing their roles in the spread of fake news in social media. An online survey was conducted to reach a wide number of university students who own at least one social media account. A well-structured questionnaire was designed containing both open and close ended questions. Google forms was used to build the survey instrument. The questionnaire was distributed to the students using different social media platforms. Collected data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 and MS Excel. The study showed that the students sometimes received COVID-19 related fake news. The main reason behind the spread of fake news is that people usually do not check the authenticity and reliability of any news before sharing and different social media groups are acting as the birthplace of fake news. The study also showed that most of the students check the authenticity and reliability and they critically evaluate each news before sharing. Majority of the students are fairly confident in detecting fake news in social media. This is the first known attempt in Bangladesh to identify the role of social media in spreading fake news during COVID-19 pandemic.
Date: December 2020
Creator: Atikuzzaman, MD.
Partner: UNT College of Information

Global Sentiment Towards COVID-19 on Twitter

Description: Twitter is one of the major social media platforms highlighting public opinion. With over 330 million users across the globe, Twitter provides insights into global sentiments on many topics. One can estimate global sentiments towards certain events relating to COVID-19 by analyzing the most common phrases and their related sentiment scores from Twitter API data. This project has compiled the most used trigrams in tweets relating to COVID-19 to calculate sentiment scores for the period from March 22 to August 7, 2020. Another goal of the project is to optimize data collection from Twitter API. Twitter limits access to tweet contents to 900 requests per 15 minutes for unpaid API users. For student data scientists, paying for increased API usage is financially infeasible. So, to deal with the rate limit, the project has written functions using the Tweepy python library to collect Twitter API data. The Pandas library has also been used to sample 139000 tweets from over 300 million. The IEEE Dataset provided sentiment scores for the full population. So, to check the integrity of my sample, I performed a Pearson correlation test between the full dataset and sample data, and got 0.84, showing the sample is representative of the population.
Date: December 2020
Creator: Auroni, Neil
Partner: UNT College of Information

An Ontology Approach to Tourism Destinations in Ethiopia

Description: This presentation covers a study conducted on tourism in Ethiopia. The study used an Ontology approach to research how Ethiopian tourism destination information can be supported with a machine-readable and interoperable model, be made visible and accessible to both international and local tourists, and improve reusability, integrity, and retrieval of tourist information in Ethiopia.
Date: 2020-12-03/2020-12-05
Creator: Hussen, Tijani
Partner: UNT Libraries

Managing Valuable Knowledge as a Tangible Asset: Creating Inventories of Organizational Knowledge

Description: Presentation for the 2017 International Conference on Knowledge Management. This presentation describes processes and templates for creating knowledge inventories as featured in his book, "Managing Organizational Knowledge: Third Generation Knowledge Management ... and, Beyond.”
Date: October 26, 2017
Creator: Tryon, Chuck
Partner: UNT College of Information
open access

Personal Knowledge Management for Empowerment (PKM4E): A Framework for Tackling Rising Big Data and Extelligence

Description: Presentation paper for the 2017 International Conference on Knowledge Management. This paper focuses on the empowerment of the individual in light of Personal Knowledge Management (PKM) learning cycles by extending the ignorance matrix in the context of Big Data and Extelligence.
Date: October 26, 2017
Creator: Schmitt, Ulrich
Partner: UNT College of Information

Facilitating Knowledge Transfer of Data Sharing Practices

Description: Poster for the 2017 International Conference on Knowledge Management. This poster discusses data sharing practices and compliance with open data mandates by using the Nonaka and Takeuchi (1995) knowledge transfer spiral model to understand behaviors and create resources for researchers.
Date: October 25, 2017
Creator: Andrews, Pamela
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Use of Twitter as a Tool to Predict Opinion Leaders that Influence Public Opinion: Case study of the 2016 United States Presidential Elections

Description: Presentation for the 2017 International Conference on Knowledge Management. This presentation discusses the use of Twitter as a tool to predict the opinion leaders that influence the general users in relation to the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election.
Date: October 25, 2017
Creator: Alfarhoud, Yousef
Partner: UNT College of Information

Data Rescue Denton

Description: Presented at the 2017 International Conference on Knowledge Management during the panel session on Big Data, Ethics and Public Engagement. This presentation discusses the Data Rescue Denton 2017 event.
Date: October 26, 2017
Creator: Caldwell, Deborah
Partner: UNT Libraries

Knowledge Discovery Through Text Mining in the United States Data Science

Description: Presented at the 2017 International Conference on Knowledge Management. This presentation examines uses knowledge discovery and text mining to identify patterns and trends in the data science discipline by examining core course titles of the Data Science curriculum offered in the United States.
Date: October 25, 2017
Creator: Khan, Hammad
Partner: UNT Libraries
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