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A Study of the Correlates of Vocational Bias in Elementary Students

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine if any correlation exists between the presence of vocational bias in elementary students and (1) the presence of bias in the textbooks they use, (2) father's occupation, (3) student grade level, (4) level of intelligence, and (5) sex of the student. The population for the study consisted of 368 kindergarten, third-grade, and sixth-grade students from two North Texas school districts. The instrument used to measure student vocational bias was the Were I a Worker attitude inventory developed by P. K. Yonge Laboratory School at the University of Florida under the direction of the Fusion of Applied and Intellectual Skills Research Project. The instrument used to categorize the father's occupations into professional and non-professional groups was the "Two-Factor Index of Social Position" developed by A. B. Hollingshead. The data were collected by having each student respond to the attitude inventory under the supervision of the participating classroom teacher. In addition, the student's I.Q., grade level, sex, and father's occupation were recorded on the test booklet. A notation was also placed on each instrument indicating the type of textbook used by that student. After all the data were collected, the attitude inventory was hand scored and the results were recorded on data sheets along with the student information involving the other variables. All statistical computations necessary to this study were done by the North Texas State University Computer Center. Two statistical tests were used to check for relationships between student vocational bias and the other variables being examined. A t-test analysis was used to test for significant differences, and multiple regression analysis was done to more accurately determine what impact the various variables had on vocational attitudes.
Date: August 1974
Creator: King, Francis Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries