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A prototype on-line work procedure system for radioisotope thermoelectric generator production

Description: An on-line system to manage work procedures is being developed to support radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) assembly and testing in a new production facility. This system implements production work procedures as interactive electronic documents executed at the work site with no intermediate printed form. It provides good control of the creation and application of work procedures and provides active assistance to the worker in performing them and in documenting the results. An extensive prototype of this system is being evaluated to ensure that it will have all the necessary features and that it will fit the user's needs and expectations. This effort has involved the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) operations organization and technology transfer between Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) and EG G Mound Applied Technologies Inc. (Mound) at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Mound Site. 1 ref.
Date: September 1, 1991
Creator: Kiebel, G.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An approach to software quality assurance for robotic inspection systems

Description: Software quality assurance (SQA) for robotic systems used in nuclear waste applications is vital to ensure that the systems operate safely and reliably and pose a minimum risk to humans and the environment. This paper describes the SQA approach for the control and data acquisition system for a robotic system being developed for remote surveillance and inspection of underground storage tanks (UST) at the Hanford Site.
Date: October 1, 1993
Creator: Kiebel, G. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Control system design for robotic underground storage tank inspection systems

Description: Control and data acquisition systems for robotic inspection and surveillance systems used in nuclear waste applications must be capable, versatile, and adaptable to changing conditions. The nuclear waste remediation application is dynamic -- requirements change as public policy is constantly re-examined and refocused, and as technology in this area advances. Control and data acquisition systems must adapt to these changing conditions and be able to accommodate future missions, both predictable and unexpected. This paper describes the control and data acquisition system for the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System that is being developed for remote surveillance and inspection of underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. It is a high-performance system which has been designed for future growth. The priority mission at the Hanford site is to retrieve the waste generated by 50 years of production from its present storage and process it for final disposal. The LDUA will help to gather information about the waste and the tanks it is stored in to better plan and execute the cleanup mission.
Date: September 1, 1994
Creator: Kiebel, G. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final Report - Spent Nuclear Fuel Retrieval System Manipulator System Cold Validation Testing

Description: Manipulator system cold validation testing (CVT) was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project, a subtask of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The FRS will be used to retrieve and repackage K-Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) currently stored in old K-Plant storage basins. The FRS is required to retrieve full fuel canisters from the basin; clean the fuel elements inside the canister to remove excessive uranium corrosion products (or sludge); remove the contents from the canisters; and sort the resulting debris, scrap, and fuel for repackaging. The fuel elements and scrap will be collected in fuel storage and scrap baskets in preparation for loading into a multi canister overpack (MCO), while the debris is loaded into a debris bin and disposed of as solid waste. The FRS is composed of three major subsystems. The Manipulator Subsystem provides remote handling of fuel, scrap, and debris; the In-Pool Equipment subsystem performs cleaning of fuel and provides a work surface for handling materials; and the Remote Viewing Subsystem provides for remote viewing of the work area by operators. There are two complete and identical FRS systems, one to be installed in the K-West basin and one to be installed in the K-East basin. Another partial system will be installed in a cold test facility to provide for operator training.
Date: August 24, 1999
Creator: Jackson, D.R. & Kiebel, G.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Light duty utility arm baseline system description

Description: This document describes the configuration of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) Baseline System. The baseline system is the initial configuration of the LDUA system that will be qualified for hot deployment in Hanford single shell underground storage tanks.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Kiebel, G.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Light Duty Utility Arm Software Test Plan

Description: This plan describes how validation testing of the software will be implemented for the integrated control and data acquisition system of the Light Duty Utility Arm System (LDUA). The purpose of LDUA software validation testing is to demonstrate and document that the LDUA software meets its software requirements specification.
Date: December 18, 1995
Creator: Kiebel, G.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Functions and requirements for the light duty utility arm integrated system

Description: The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) Integrated System is a mobile robotic system designed to remotely deploy and operate a variety of tools in uninhabitable underground radiological and hazardous waste storage tanks. The system primarily provides a means to inspect, survey, monitor, map and/or obtain specific waste and waste tank data in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) mission at Hanford and remediation programs at other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites.
Date: January 25, 1996
Creator: Kiebel, G.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Functions and requirements for the Light-Duty Utility Arm Integrated System. Revision 1

Description: The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) Integrated System is a mobile robotic system designed to remotely deploy and operate a variety of tools in uninhabitable underground radiological and hazardous waste storage tanks. The system primarily provides a means to inspect, survey, monitor, map and/or obtain specific waste and waste tank data in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) mission at Hanford and remediation programs at other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites.
Date: January 25, 1996
Creator: Kiebel, G.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Light duty utility arm deployment in Hanford tank T-106

Description: An existing gap in the technology for the remediation of underground waste storage tanks filled by the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. On September 27 and 30, 1996, the LDUA System was deployed in underground storage tank T-106 at Hanford. The system performed successfully, satisfying all objectives of the in-tank operational test (hot test); performing close-up video inspection of features of tank dome, risers, and wall; and grasping and repositioning in-tank debris. The successful completion of hot testing at Hanford means that areas of tank structure and waste surface that were previously inaccessible are now within reach of remote tools for inspection, waste analysis, and small-scale retrieval. The LDUA System has become a new addition to the arsenal of technologies being applied to solve tank waste remediation challenges.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Kiebel, G.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design criteria for the light duty utility arm system end effectors

Description: The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the design of end effectors that will be used as part of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. Actual component design, fabrication, testing, and inspection will be performed by various DOE laboratories, industry, and academia. This document augments WHC-SD-TD-FRD-003, `Functions and Requirements for the Light Duty Utility Arm Integrated System` (F). All requirements dictated in the F shall also be applicable in this document. Whenever conflicts arise between this document and the F, this document shall take precedence.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Pardini, A.F. & Kiebel, G.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Light duty utility arm software requirements specification

Description: This document defines the software requirements for the integrated control and data acquisition system of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. It is intended to be used to guide the design of the application software, to be a basis for assessing the application software design, and to establish what is to be tested in the finished application software product.
Date: December 18, 1995
Creator: Kiebel, G.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Light duty utility arm equipment qualification test procedure

Description: The Equipment Qualification Test described in this test procedure document is the acceptance test procedure (ATP) for the LDUA Baseline System. It verifies that the equipment is complete and in working order, and demonstrates its readiness for being deployed into an actual underground storage tank.
Date: July 22, 1996
Creator: Kiebel, G.R., Westinghouse Hanford
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Usability testing of the human-machine interface for the Light Duty Utility Arm System

Description: This report describes the usability testing that has been done for the control and data acquisition system for the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. A program of usability testing has been established as a part of a process for making the LDUA as easy to use as possible. The LDUA System is being designed to deploy a family of tools, called End Effectors, into underground storage tanks by means of a robotic arm on the end of a telescoping mast, and to collect and manage the data that they generate. The LDUA System uses a vertical positioning mast, to lower the arm into a tank through an existing 30.5 cm access riser. A Mobile Deployment Subsystem is used to position the mast and arm over a tank riser for deployment, and to transport them from tank to tank. The LDUA System has many ancillary subsystems including the Operations Control Trailer, the Tank Riser Interface and Confinement Subsystem, the Decontamination Subsystem, and the End Effector Exchange Subsystem. This work resulted in the identification of several important improvements to the LDUA control and data acquisition system before the design was frozen. The most important of these were color coding of joints in motion, simultaneous operator control of multiple joints, and changes to the field-of-views of the camera lenses for the robot and other camera systems.
Date: September 20, 1994
Creator: Kiebel, G. R.; Ellis, J. E. & Masliah, M. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Light Duty Utility Arm System hot test

Description: This Engineering Task Plan describes the scope of work and cost for implementing a hot test of the Light Duty Utility Arm System in Tank T-106 in September 1996.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Howden, G.F.; Conrad, R.B. & Kiebel, G.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department