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Simulation of SBWR startup transient and stability

Description: The Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) designed by General Electric is a natural circulation reactor with enhanced safety features for potential accidents. It has a strong coupling between power and flow in the reactor core, hence the neutronic coupling with thermal-hydraulics is specially important. The potential geysering instability during the early part of a SBWR startup at low flow, low power and low pressure is of particular concern. The RAMONA-4B computer code developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the SBWR has been used to simulate a SBWR startup transient and evaluate its stability, using a simplified four-channel representation of the reactor core for the thermal-hydraulics. This transient was run for 20,000 sec (5.56 hrs) in order to cover the essential aspect of the SBWR startup. The simulation showed that the SBWR startup was a very challenging event to analyze as it required accurate modeling of the thermal-hydraulics at low pressures. This analysis did not show any geysering instability during the startup, following the startup procedure as proposed by GE.
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Cheng, H.S.; Khan, H.J. & Rohatgi, U.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance characterization of isolation condenser of SBWR

Description: A systematic study of the performance of the Isolation Condenser (IC) for a conceptual design of SBWR is presented. The objective of the IC is to passively remove heat and control the pressure variation in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). According to the observed trends, the IC cooling capacity and condensate flow can independently influence the ultimate performance of the IC. The transient pressure profile for the IC reaches different equilibrium values for each of the cases analyzed. The absolute magnitude of these values are a function of the cooling capacity and flow rates. With appropriate control of the liquid flow loss coefficients, the performance of the IC can be well predicted. Due to the lack of useful data, this study is limited to the numerical simulation of the IC.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Khan, H.J. & Rohatgi, U.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Prediction of BWR performance under the influence of Isolation Condenser-using RAMONA-4 code

Description: The purpose of the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Isolation Condenser (IC) is to passively control the reactor pressure by removing heat from the system. This type of control is expected to reduce the frequency of opening and closing of the Safety Relief Valves (SRV). A comparative analysis is done for a BWR operating with and without the influence of an IC under Main Steam Isolation Valve (MSIV) closure. A regular BWR, with forced flow and high thermal power, has been considered for analysis. In addition, the effect of ICs on the BWR performance is studied for natural convection flow at lower power and modified riser geometry. The IC is coupled to the steam dome for the steam inlet flow and the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) near the feed water entrance for the condensate return flow. Transient calculations are performed using prescribed pressure set points for the SRVs and given time settings for MSIV closure. The effect of the IC on the forced flow is to reduce the rate of pressure rise and thereby decrease the cycling frequency ofthe SRVS. This is the primary objective of any operating IC in a BWR (e.g. Oyster Creek). The response of the reactor thermal and fission power, steam flow rate, collapsed liquid level, and core average void fraction are found to agree with the trend of pressure. The variations in the case of an active IC can be closely related to the creation of a time lag and changes in the cycling frequency of the SRVS. An analysis for natural convection flow in a BWR indicates that the effect of an IC on its transient performance is similar to that for the forced convection system. In this case, the MSIV closure, has resulted in a lower peak pressure due to the magnitude of reduced ...
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Khan, H.J.; Cheng, H.S. & Rohatgi, U.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Prediction of BWR performance under the influence of Isolation Condenser-using RAMONA-4 code

Description: The purpose of the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Isolation Condenser (IC) is to passively control the reactor pressure by removing heat from the system. This type of control is expected to reduce the frequency of opening and closing of the Safety Relief Valves (SRV). A comparative analysis is done for a BWR operating with and without the influence of an IC under Main Steam Isolation Valve (MSIV) closure. A regular BWR, with forced flow and high thermal power, has been considered for analysis. In addition, the effect of ICs on the BWR performance is studied for natural convection flow at lower power and modified riser geometry. The IC is coupled to the steam dome for the steam inlet flow and the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) near the feed water entrance for the condensate return flow. Transient calculations are performed using prescribed pressure set points for the SRVs and given time settings for MSIV closure. The effect of the IC on the forced flow is to reduce the rate of pressure rise and thereby decrease the cycling frequency ofthe SRVS. This is the primary objective of any operating IC in a BWR (e.g. Oyster Creek). The response of the reactor thermal and fission power, steam flow rate, collapsed liquid level, and core average void fraction are found to agree with the trend of pressure. The variations in the case of an active IC can be closely related to the creation of a time lag and changes in the cycling frequency of the SRVS. An analysis for natural convection flow in a BWR indicates that the effect of an IC on its transient performance is similar to that for the forced convection system. In this case, the MSIV closure, has resulted in a lower peak pressure due to the magnitude of reduced ...
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Khan, H. J.; Cheng, H. S. & Rohatgi, U. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RAMONA-4B a computer code with three-dimensional neutron kinetics for BWR and SBWR system transient - user`s manual

Description: This document is the User`s Manual for the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) systems transient code RAMONA-4B. The code uses a three-dimensional neutron-kinetics model coupled with a multichannel, nonequilibrium, drift-flux, phase-flow model of the thermal hydraulics of the reactor vessel. The code is designed to analyze a wide spectrum of BWR core and system transients. Chapter 1 gives an overview of the code`s capabilities and limitations; Chapter 2 describes the code`s structure, lists major subroutines, and discusses the computer requirements. Chapter 3 is on code, auxillary codes, and instructions for running RAMONA-4B on Sun SPARC and IBM Workstations. Chapter 4 contains component descriptions and detailed card-by-card input instructions. Chapter 5 provides samples of the tabulated output for the steady-state and transient calculations and discusses the plotting procedures for the steady-state and transient calculations. Three appendices contain important user and programmer information: lists of plot variables (Appendix A) listings of input deck for sample problem (Appendix B), and a description of the plotting program PAD (Appendix C). 24 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.
Date: March 1998
Creator: Rohatgi, U. S.; Cheng, H. S.; Khan, H. J.; Mallen, A. N. & Neymotin, L. Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RAMONA-4B a computer code with three-dimensional neutron kinetics for BWR and SBWR system transient - models and correlations

Description: This document describes the major modifications and improvements made to the modeling of the RAMONA-3B/MOD0 code since 1981, when the code description and assessment report was completed. The new version of the code is RAMONA-4B. RAMONA-4B is a systems transient code for application to different versions of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) such as the current BWR, the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR), and the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). This code uses a three-dimensional neutron kinetics model coupled with a multichannel, non-equilibrium, drift-flux, two-phase flow formulation of the thermal hydraulics of the reactor vessel. The code is designed to analyze a wide spectrum of BWR core and system transients and instability issues. Chapter 1 is an overview of the code`s capabilities and limitations; Chapter 2 discusses the neutron kinetics modeling and the implementation of reactivity edits. Chapter 3 is an overview of the heat conduction calculations. Chapter 4 presents modifications to the thermal-hydraulics model of the vessel, recirculation loop, steam separators, boron transport, and SBWR specific components. Chapter 5 describes modeling of the plant control and safety systems. Chapter 6 presents and modeling of Balance of Plant (BOP). Chapter 7 describes the mechanistic containment model in the code. The content of this report is complementary to the RAMONA-3B code description and assessment document. 53 refs., 81 figs., 13 tabs.
Date: March 1998
Creator: Rohatgi, U. S.; Cheng, H. S.; Khan, H. J.; Mallen, A. N. & Neymotin, L. Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRT) for SBWR start-up stability

Description: Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRT) have been developed for start-up transient for SBWP. The information used for PIRT came from RAMONA-4B and TRACG analyses of the transient and from related small scale tests. The transient was divided into four distinct phases, namely, Subcooled Core Heat-up, Subcooled Chimney, Saturated Chimney and Power Ascension. The assessment criterion selected was Minimum Critical Power Ratio. The SBWR system was divided into ten components. A total of 33 distinct phenomena among the components were identified. The Phase I has 28 ranked phenomena with 17 low, 6 medium and 5 high ranking. The Phase II has 39 ranked phenomena with 18 low, 13 median and 8 high ranking. The Phase III has 47 ranked phenomena with 22 low, 10 medium and 15 high ranking. The Phase IV has 46 ranked phenomena with 16 low, 12 medium and 18 high ranking. 12 refs., 22 figs., 21 tabs.
Date: March 1997
Creator: Rohatgi, U. S.; Cheng, H. S.; Khan, H. J. & Wulff, K. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RAMONA-4B development for SBWR safety studies

Description: The Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) is a revolutionary design of a boiling-water reactor. The reactor is based on passive safety systems such as natural circulation, gravity flow, pressurized gas, and condensation. SBWR has no active systems, and the flow in the vessel is by natural circulation. There is a large chimney section above the core to provide a buoyancy head for natural circulation. The reactor can be shut down by either of four systems; namely, scram, Fine Motion Control Rod Drive (FMCRD), Alternate Rod Insertion (ARI), and Standby Liquid Control System (SLCS). The safety injection is by gravity drain from the Gravity Driven Cooling System (GDCS) and Suppression Pool (SP). The heat sink is through two types of heat exchangers submerged in the tank of water. These heat exchangers are the Isolation Condenser (IC) and the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS). The RAMONA-4B code has been developed to simulate the normal operation, reactivity transients, and to address the instability issues for SBWR. The code has a three-dimensional neutron kinetics coupled to multiple parallel-channel thermal-hydraulics. The two-phase thermal hydraulics is based on a nonhomogeneous nonequilibrium drift-flux formulation. It employs an explicit integration to solve all state equations (except for neutron kinetics) in order to predict the instability without numerical damping. The objective of this project is to develop a Sun SPARC and IBM RISC 6000 based RAMONA-4B code for applications to SBWR safety analyses, in particular for stability and ATWS studies.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Rohatgi, U. S.; Aronson, A. L.; Cheng, H. S.; Khan, H. J. & Mallen, A. N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department