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Underwater with a Hand Lens in the Rivers of Cape Horn, Chile; Ecology, Biocultural Conservation and Education at the Top of the World (55°S) or Zen and communicating aquatic ecology at the Top of the World (55°S)

Description: This presentation is part of the faculty lecture series UNT Speaks Out on Water Conservation. In this presentation, the author discusses the rivers of Cape Horn, Chile and biocultural conservation and education.
Date: April 22, 2013
Creator: Kennedy, James H.
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

Evaluating the Habitat Requirements of the Golden Orb Mussel (Quadrula Aurea) for Conservation Purposes

Description: Many freshwater mussels are imperiled, due to a number of interrelated factors such as habitat alteration, degradation of water quality, and impoundments. The Golden Orb mussel (Quadrula aurea, I. Lea, 1859) is endemic to the state of Texas and is currently a candidate for the endangered species list, as the number of known populations has been declining in recent years. Little is currently known about Q. aurea aside from basic distribution data. This study is focused on evaluating a combination of macro-habitat and micro-habitat variables to determine their influence on the distribution and density of this species. Macro-habitat variables, including dominant land cover, surface geology, and soil erodibility factor, did not have a significant relationship with mussel distributions. The best model of micro-habitat variables that impacts the Q. aurea distributions is comprised of relative substrate stability (RSS) at moderate flows and current velocity at low flows. For all mussel species in this study, current velocity at low flows is the primary variable that influences distribution. Q. aurea are associated with habitats where larger sediment particles (large gravel and cobble) help to stabilize the substrate in areas with higher current velocities. An understanding of the preferred habitats for Q. aurea can be used to help focus conservation efforts and practices.
Date: May 2013
Creator: Hammontree, Sarah
Partner: UNT Libraries

Applications of Remote Sensing and GIS to Modeling Fire for Vegetative Restoration in Northern Arizona

Description: An accurate fire model is a useful tool in predicting the behavior of a prescribed fire. Simulation of fire requires an extensive amount of data and can be accomplished best using GIS applications. This paper demonstrates integrative procedures of using of ArcGIS™, ERDAS Imagine™, GPS, and FARSITE© to predict prescribed fire behavior on the Kaibab-Paiute Reservation. ArcGIS was used to create a database incorporating all variables into a common spatial reference system and format for the FARSITE model. ArcGIS Spatial Analyst was then used to select optimal burn sites for simulation. Our predictions will be implemented in future interagency efforts towards vegetative restoration on the reservation.
Date: August 2003
Creator: Hardison, Tanya
Partner: UNT Libraries

Population Dynamics and Community Structure of Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) Recorded in Denton, Texas from 2005 to 2015

Description: A population survey was conducted on the mosquito species recorded in Denton, Texas for the years of 2005 to 2015. Data used in this project were obtained from an ongoing, long-term surveillance program led by the City of Denton and conducted through the University of North Texas. Research focused on the population dynamics and community structure of mosquitoes collected within urban areas of Denton, Texas in relation to certain environmental variables. A total of 80,837 female mosquitoes were captured and represented 38 species found under the following genera: Aedes, Anopheles, Coquillettidia, Culex, Culiseta, Mansonia, Orthopodomyia, Psorophora, Toxorhynchites, and Uranotaenia. Culex quinquefasciatus was the most abundant species followed by Aedes vexans. Seasonal patterns of the most abundant species revealed high variability throughout the study. Container breeders were most abundant in August and those that breed in floodwaters were most abundant in the months of May and September. Samples were tested for arbovirus presence through the Texas Department of State Health Services in Austin, Texas and multiple pools tested positive for West Nile virus throughout the study. Stepwise multiple regression and Spearman's rank correlation analyses were performed to examine the relationship between the mosquito community and environmental variables. Data revealed that temperature, precipitation, and dew point were the most important variables influencing the mosquito population in the City of Denton.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: May 2018
Creator: Hambrick, Bethany Lynn
Partner: UNT Libraries

Biodiversity and Genetic Structure of Benthic Macroinvertebrates along an Altitudinal Gradient: A Comparison of the Windhond and Róbalo River Communities on Navarino Island, Chile

Description: Altitudinal gradients in Sub-Antarctic freshwater systems present unique opportunities to study the effect of distinct environmental gradients on benthic macroinvertebrate community composition and dispersal. This study investigates patterns in biodiversity, dispersal and population genetic structure of benthic macroinvertebrate fauna across an altitudinal gradient between two watersheds on Navarino Island in southern Chile. Patterns in diversity, density, evenness and functional feeding groups were not significantly different across the altitudinal gradient in both the Windhond and Róbalo Rivers. Taxa richness in both rivers generally increased from the headwaters of the river to the mouth, and functional feeding group patterns were consistent with the predictions of the River Continuum Concept. Population genetic structure and gene flow was investigated by sampling the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene in two invertebrate species with different dispersal strategies. Hyalella simplex (Amphipoda) is an obligate aquatic species, and Meridialaris chiloeense (Ephemeroptera) is an aquatic larvae and a terrestrial winged adult. Contrasting patterns of population genetic structure were observed. Results for Hyalella simplex indicate significant differentiation in genetic structure in the Amphipod populations between watersheds and lower genetic diversity in the Róbalo River samples, which may be a result of instream dispersal barriers. Meridialaris chiloeense exhibited weak population structure but higher genetic diversity, which suggests this species is able to disperse widely as a winged adult.
Date: May 2016
Creator: Pulliam, Lauren
Partner: UNT Libraries

Improving Scientific Learning and Supporting Civic Engagement for Undergraduate Non-science Majors

Description: In prior research focusing on teaching and learning science, a definitive trend toward a new approach for undergraduate non-major science courses has emerged. Instruction should be refocused from information-transfer to giving students experiences that allow them to explore and engage in their new knowledge and find ways to integrate it into their everyday lives. One technique is to focus class material on real issues of interest and relevance. Course development that allows for civic engagement and self discovery connects learning to the lives of students and their communities. This study used a quasi-experimental design to see if students who engaged in their learning had improved learning gains, increased motivation, and ability to relate it to their lives. The results showed that students were more motivated to connect the subject to their lives when they engaged through civic engagement projects. Techniques used in this research can be used in the future to develop science courses that focus on the needs of 21st century learners.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Taylor, Alana Presley
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Influence of Local Forage Variability on White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) Body Size at Fort Hood, Texas

Description: Nutritional quality and availability is thought to regulate geographic patterns of variability in animal body size due to phenotypic plasticity. The purpose of this study is to determine how vegetation quality, abundance and population density influence white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) body size on a subregional spatial scale at Fort Hood, Texas. Harvest and census records are used to test the hypothesis that white-tailed deer exhibit phenotypic plasticity (e.g. larger body size) in response to differences in vegetation quality and availability. Results from these analyses suggest that forage quality and abundance alone is not a main driver of white-tailed deer body size. Analysis of deer population density (generally) resulted in an inverse relationship with body size. Areas with high quality forage and low population density support larger deer while areas with low quality forage and high density support smaller than average deer. The few exceptions occur in areas exhibiting poor quality forage and low population density or high forage quality and high density. Results from this study suggest that continued overcrowding of deer within isolated areas may eventually lead to efficiency phenotypic conditions producing smaller sized deer. These results could prove useful in interpreting deer population responses to harvest management. For successful local management of deer, studies examining the combined influence of habitat variables (such as forage quality, abundance and population density) on deer health offer managers valuable information needed to establish annual harvest goals and understand deer-habitat relationships relative to carrying capacity.
Date: December 2015
Creator: Eddins, Amy C.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Life History and Case Building Behaviors of Phylloicus ornatus (Banks) (Trichoptera: Calamoceratidae) In Two Spring Fed Tributaries in the Central Edwards Plateau Bioregion of Texas

Description: The life history and case-making behaviors of Phylloicus ornatus from two springfed first order streams in the Edwards Plateau Bioregion of Texas were studied from January 1998 to November 1999. Field larval, pupal and adult samples and laboratory rearings indicated a multivoltine cycle. First instars differ from late instars in number of labral setae and in having a unique spur-like claw on each lateral hump. Larval development was asynchronous with second through fifth instars and pupae present most months. First instars were present April through July, October and November. Case making of first instar and case reconstruction of later instars extracted from their cases was documented by videophotography.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: August 2000
Creator: Norwood, James Christopher
Partner: UNT Libraries

Macroinvertebrate Community Structure as an Indicator of Watershed Health in the Upper Trinity River Basin, North Central Texas

Description: This study describes macroinvertebrate community structure and assesses its potential in detecting point and non-point sources of disturbance associated with rural and urban areas in the Upper Trinity River Basin. Geospatial techniques were used to quantify landuse within the watershed in a GIS. At rural sites near the headwaters of the Trinity River, collector-gathering burrowers that are adapted to minimal flow comprised the majority of taxa. Destinies of taxa compositions at downstream sites increased and shifted toward psammophilic and rheophilic invertebrates, including primarily collector-filtering clingers, that are characteristic of shifting sand habitats in large prairie rivers. Benthic community structure generally benefited from point source impacts including wastewater treatment plant effluents that maintained higher flow. Community indices were negatively associated with forest landuse and positively associated with urban landuse. Partial CCA determined that flow and landuse contributed equally to species dispersions. Comparisons with historical biomonitoring studies in upper Trinity River Basin indicate improved watershed health.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: May 2000
Creator: Stephenson, Jaynie M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Organochlorine Pesticides and Heavy Metals in Fish From the Trinity River, Texas

Description: The Trinity River passes through the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex receiving point and non-point source contaminant loadings. Lepomis spp. were collected at twelve sampling locations in the Trinity River in August 1987 and September 1988 and analyzed for organochlorine pesticides and heavy metals. Results from the study were compared to existing U.S. FDA action and tolerance levels, LC50s, and historical data. Various longitudinal trends and some concentration patterns were observed. Continual study of pesticide and metal body burdens in fish allow testing for trends, and thereby, lead to a better understanding of the distribution of contaminants in the Trinity River.
Date: May 1990
Creator: Martinez, Maria L., 1960-
Partner: UNT Libraries

Benthic Macroinvertebrates of Temperate, Sub-Antarctic Streams: The Effects of Altitudinal Zoning and Temperature on the Phenology of Aquatic Insects Associated to the Robalo River, Navarino Island (55°S), Chile

Description: The Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve, within the remote Sub-Antarctic ecoregion is a reservoir of expressions of biological and cultural diversity. Although it is considered one of 24 wilderness areas remaining in the world, it is not free from local and global threats, such as invasive species, and climate change. Field biologists and philosophers associated to the Sub-Antarctic Biocultural Conservation Program and the Omora Ethnobotanical Park, have worked to describe the region’s biocultural diversity, linking ecological and philosophical research into education, ecotourism, and conservation, through a methodology called field environmental philosophy (FEP), which integrates ecological sciences and environmental ethics through a 4-step cycle consisting of: 1) interdisciplinary research; 2) composition of metaphors; 3) design of field activities with an ecological and ethical orientation; and 4) implementation of in situ conservation areas. In this context, the purposes of this dissertation were to: 1) provide a comprehensive review of publications regarding the conservation status of aquatic and terrestrial insects at a global scale and with an emphasis in southern South America; 2) study the distribution of benthic macroinvertebrates through the sharp altitudinal gradient of the Róbalo River watershed; 3) describe the life histories of Gigantodax sp (Simuliidae: Diptera) and Meridialaris chiloeense (Leptophlebiidae: Ephemeroptera) in the Róbalo River and to assess the potential effects of climate change on their phenology; and 4) to apply FEP methodology in order to better understand and communicate the intrinsic and instrumental values of freshwater invertebrates in the Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve.
Date: December 2011
Creator: Contador Mejías, Tamara Andrea
Partner: UNT Libraries

Life History And Secondary Production Of Cheumatopsyche Lasia Ross (Trichoptera: Hydropsychidae) With Respect To A Wastewater Treatment Facility In A North Texas Urban Stream

Description: This study represents the first shift in multivoltine life history of Cheumatopsyche species from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in North America. Populations of C. lasia were examined upstream and downstream of the Denton’s Pecan Creek WWTP August 2009 through November 2010. C. lasia is multivoltine in Pecan Creek with three cohorts observed upstream of the WWTP and four possible cohorts downstream. A fourth generation was possible downstream as thermal inputs from WWTP effluent resulted in elevated water temperatures that allowed larval development to progress through the winter producing a cohort ready to emerge in spring. Production of C. lasia was 5 times greater downstream of the WWTP with secondary production estimates of 1.3 g m-2 yr-1 and 4.88- 6.51 g m-2 yr-1, respectively. Differences in abundance were due to increased habitat availability downstream of the WWTP in addition to continuous stream flow from inputs of wastewater effluent. Results also suggest that C. lasia is important for energy transfer in semiarid urban prairie streams and may serve as a potential conduit for the transfer of energy along with emergent contaminants to terrestrial ecosystems. These finding highlight the need for more quantitative accounts of population dynamics (voltinism, development rates, secondary production, and P/B) of aquatic insect species to fully understand the ecology and energy dynamics of urban systems.
Date: December 2011
Creator: Paul, Jenny Sueanna
Partner: UNT Libraries

Testing New Measures of Age Independent Body Size in White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus)

Description: The four elements of the lower hind foot (calcaneus, metatarsal, naviculo-cuboid, and tibia) were tested for use as age-independent proxies of body size in white-tailed deer using known aged specimens from Ft. Hood Texas. Statistical analysis indicates that the calcaneum and the tibia are good proxies of age-independent body size in white-tailed deer. In addition to expanding the list of elements that can be used for studies of age-independent body size, these elements can also be used to age faunal remains to an ordinal scale of juveniles and adults. This is useful for research regarding prehistoric prey populations; as a single element can be used to determine prey body size and age simultaneously, which are the two variables used to assess changes in human subsistence practices via the archaeological remains of their prey.
Date: August 2009
Creator: Densmore, Julie A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

IBM 1401 Computer Produced and Maintained Library Circulation Records

Description: Report issued by the University of California Lawrence Radiation Laboratory discussing a method of updating library circulation records on an IBM 1401 computer. The report describes the methods of generating and updating the records using transaction cards to create computer tapes that are sorted and updated to prepare current reports of circulation information.
Date: January 23, 1964
Creator: Kennedy, James H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Socio-ecological Assessment of Watershed Ecosystem Services in Southern Patagonia

Description: This thesis utilizes a theoretical framework which links biophysical and social domains of ecosystems via ecosystem services (ES), in order to conduct a socio-ecological assessment of urban watersheds in three communities in Chilean and Argentine regions of southern Patagonia. Results from this study show that expanding urban areas may be undermining the ability of local watersheds to provide for high quality ES posing potential risks to community wellbeing. Secondly, researchers and decision makers influencing regional natural resource management share similar values to general community members but do not capture the diversity of values that exist within the broader community, and dialogue between these groups on management issues is poor. A community-based management structure is recommended for the creation of adaptive and locally relevant management strategies.
Date: August 2012
Creator: Zagarola, Jean-Paul Aguirre
Partner: UNT Libraries

Effects of Sublethal Copper Exposure on Escape Behavior and Growth of Rana pipiens Tadpoles

Description: This research is designed to test how sublethal exposure to copper affects tadpole predator-escape behavior and how quickly tadpoles recover. After exposure, tadpoles were separated. Escape behavior was recorded for two-thirds of exposed tadpoles while one-third of the exposed population was measured weekly to determine growth and recovery. Control tadpoles were consumed within 15 minutes whereas those exposed to higher concentrations were consumed at a slower rate, which does not support the hypotheses. Although the rate of predation was lower, tadpoles exposed to higher Cu concentrations were on average, 1.47 cm in total body length. Those exposed to 0.93 mg/L averaged 0.86 cm. After being placed into clean water, treatment tadpoles recovered after 20 days.
Date: May 2002
Creator: Redick, Melinda
Partner: UNT Libraries

Sediment Bound Trace Metals in the White Rock Creek Watershed, Dallas and Collin Counties

Description: Areas were sampled in the White Rock Creek Watershed to examine sediment bound trace metal distributions and sorption relationships. A Kruskal-Wallis AOV found significant among area differences for most metals, and SNK-like multiple comparisons were used to group these areas. Kruskal-Wallis AOVs similarly found among area differences for sediment components that bind trace metals (Fe and Mn oxides and organic carbon) and physicochemical conditions that influence metal sorption (particle size and pH). Multiple correlation found numerous relationships among trace metals, sediment components, and physicochemical conditions. Statistical relationships indicate that metal partitioning to various sorption factors is metal specific. White Rock Creek Watershed trace metal concentrations are comparable to those in many urban watersheds.
Date: May 1990
Creator: Combest, Kyle B. (Kyle Bryan)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Pyrethroid Insecticide Effects on Bluegill Sunfish (Lepomis Macrochirus) and the Impacts of Bluegill Predation on Invertebrates in Microcosms

Description: Concurrent outdoor aquatic 1950 L microcosm and 0.04 ha mesocosm experiments with bluegill sunfish evaluated the ecological impact of cyfluthrin. Cyfluthrin effects were not observed on mesocosm bluegill; a slight decrease in growth was observed in the microcosm bluegill. Otolith weight to length relationships between bluegill size-classes from microcosms, local streams, and a fish hatchery revealed no differences. Our results indicated bluegill predation impacts were slight on benthic invertebrates. Extensive predation on emerging insects was observed. Microcosm bluegill impacts on zooplankton populations followed expected predation effects, resulting in larger populations of smaller taxa. Bluegill functioned as "keystone" predators for microcosm taxa and improved taxa richness for benthic colonizing invertebrates and zooplankton.
Date: May 1991
Creator: Morris, Rodney Gregg
Partner: UNT Libraries

Interactions among Temperature, pH, and Cyfluthrin on Survival of the Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas

Description: The 96-hr LC50 of cyfluthrin in Pimephales promelas ata temperature of 23*C and a pH of 8 was 1.08 g/L. The toxicity of cyfluthrin was inversely related to temperature and pH. A temperature of 10*C and a pH of 6 significantly decreased the 96-hr LC50 to 0.009 gg/L. Likewise, sublethal exposures to cyfluthrin significantly affected the fathead minnow's ability to tolerate high and low temperatures. Cyfluthrin compromised the fathead minnow's lower temperature tolerance (CTMin) by 60C and the upper temperature tolerance (CTMax) by 20C. Although cyfluthrin may not be present in the environment in large amounts due to its physical and chemical properties, small concentrations ( g/L) may adversely affect fish populations.
Date: December 1991
Creator: Heath, Susan M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Analysis of the One-Horned Rhinoceros (Rhinoceros Unicornis) Habitat in the Royal Chitwan National Park, Nepal.

Description: This study analyzes the remaining suitable habitat of the one-horned rhinoceros, Rhinoceros unicornis, in Royal Chitwan National Park of Nepal. An April 2003 Landsat image was classified into eight land cover types: wetland, sand, water, mixed forest, sal forest, agriculture, settlement, and grassland. This image was converted into habitat suitability maps using cover, food, and water. The rhinoceros prefers grassland habitat with oxbow lakes and closed canopy during the monsoon season. Nominal values of five parameters were used to create a map of habitat suitability index. The map was categorized into four habitat classes: highly unsuitable, unsuitable, moderately suitable habitat, and suitable. Landscape metrics, patch metrics and class metrics associated with habitat were determined through the use of FRAGSTATS.
Date: December 2005
Creator: Thapa, Vivek
Partner: UNT Libraries