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Glimpses of Utopia Near Death? A Rejoinder

Description: Abstract: Five scholars have offered comments, suggestions, and criticisms of my paper "Near-Death Experiences and Pursuit of the Ideal Society." In this rejoinder, I reply to those comments and elaborate on aspects of my earlier paper. I discuss issues of methodology, epistemology, validity, logic, and other social considerations with respect to the plausibility of viewing some near-death imagery as utopian. I conclude with some reflections on the social character and study of the near-death experience.
Date: Winter 1991
Creator: Kellehear, Allan
Partner: UNT Libraries

Culture and the Near-Death Experience: Comments on Keith Augustine's "Psychophysiological and Cultural Correlates Undermining a Survivalist Interpretation of Near-Death Experiences"

Description: Abstract: This paper is a sociological commentary on the leading paper by Keith Augustine. It discusses the relationship between social expectations and culture as well as extending the discussion about the possibility that near-death experiences may not be a singular entity. I suggest there are sound grounds for developing a typology of experiences that have different and or overlapping causes and phenomenology.
Date: Winter 2007
Creator: Kellehear, Allan
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Hawaiian Near-Death Experience

Description: Article presenting a case report of an Hawaiian near-death experience (NDE) from the early 1900s, which was uncovered in a turn-of-the-century monograph of Hawaiian folk tales. The account differs from others in the same volume because it appears to be a real-life account rather than a folk tale. The article describes similarities and differences from other Polynesian NDE account in the literature, a Maori NDE reported by Michael King in 1985.
Date: Autumn 2001
Creator: Kellehear, Allan
Partner: UNT Libraries

Census of Non-Western Near-Death Experiences to 2005: Overview of the Current Data

Description: Abstract: This paper provides a census of non-Western near-death experiences (NDEs), noting similarities and differences in features with Western NDEs and other non-Western NDEs. The two sims of this current review are to update previous transcultural reviews with current data and to describe both crosscultural and culture-specific features of NDEs.
Date: Summer 2008
Creator: Kellehear, Allan
Partner: UNT Libraries

Death and Renewal in The Velveteen Rabbit: A Sociological Reading

Description: Article providing a sociological interpretation of The Velveteen Rabbit critical of recent materialist and psychoanalytic readings, and arguing that this children's story exemplifies the use of a non-materialistic idea of death to suggest other themes about love and life, and discuss implications for near-death research.
Date: Autumn 1993
Creator: Kellehear, Allan
Partner: UNT Libraries

Five Minutes After Death: A Study of Beliefs and Expectations

Description: Abstract: This paper examines the beliefs and expectations that a sample of 508 people hold about the first five minutes after death. A substantial minority believed that they will experience the main elements of the near-death experience (NDE). In general these elements were cited more frequently than were Biblical images. Six percent of the sample said that postmortem survival for them will be a negative and disturbing experience. We discuss these results in terms of their methodological implications for other survey work and their theoretical contribution toward our understanding of negative NDEs.
Date: Winter 1990
Creator: Kellehear, Allan &
Partner: UNT Libraries

Community Attitudes Toward Near-Death Experiences: An Australian Study

Description: Abstract: In an Australian survey of community attitudes toward near-death experiences (NDEs), 173 respondents were asked to read a hypothetical description of an NDE and to select from a range of explanations that might approximate their own. Fifty-seven percent of the respondents believed the NDE was evidence of life after death, while less than 2 percent believed the NDE was a sign of mental illness. Women, younger persons, and those who professed a belief in life after death were more likely to react positively to the NDE described.
Date: Spring 1989
Creator: Kellehear, Allan & Heaven, Patrick
Partner: UNT Libraries

Near-Death Experiences and the Measurement of Blood Gases

Description: Abstract: Although cerebral anoxia is not thought to be responsible for triggering near-death experiences (NDEs), the issue is not so clear in the case of hypercapnia. Detection of normal blood gases in Michael Sabom's (1982) case study seems to be the major reply to suggest that hypercapnia may have a causal role in NDEs. We argue, however, that routine arterial measures of blood gases are not a reliable indicator of cerebral levels.
Date: Autumn 1990
Creator: Gliksman, Michael D. & Kellehear, Allan
Partner: UNT Libraries

Community Attitudes Toward Near-Death Experiences: A Chinese Study

Description: Abstract: In a survey of Chinese attitudes toward near-death experiences (NDEs), 197 respondents were read a hypothetical description of an NDE and asked to choose from a range of explanations and social reactions that might approximate their own. Fifty-eight percent of respondents believed that NDEs were probably hallucinations or dreams. Less than nine percent believed the NDE was evidence of life after death. Rural and younger persons were more likely to react positively to NDErs. The results are discussed with reference to an earlier Australian study by Kellehear and Heaven (1989).
Date: Spring 1990
Creator: Kellehear, Allan; Heaven, Patrick & Gao, Jia
Partner: UNT Libraries