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Thyratron characteristics under high di/dt and high-repetition-rate operation

Description: Power conditioning systems for high peak and average power, high repetition rate discharge excited lasers involve operation of modulator components in unconventional regimes. Reliable operation of switches and energy storage elements under high voltage and high di/dt conditions is a pacing item for laser development at the present time. To test and evaluate these components a Modulator Component Test Facility (MCTF) was constructed. The MCTF consists of a command charge system, energy storage capacitors, thyratron switch with inverse thyratron protection, and a resistive load. The modulator has initially been operated at voltages up to 60 kV at 600 Hz. Voltage, current, and calorimetric diagnostics are provided for major modulator components. Measurements of thyratron characteristics under high di/dt operation are presented. Commutation energy loss and di/dt have been measured as functions of the tube hydrogen pressure.
Date: May 11, 1981
Creator: Ball, D.; Hill, J. & Kan, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrated development and testing plan for the plutonium immobilization project

Description: This integrated plan for the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) describes the technology development and major project activities necessary to support the deployment of the immobilization approach for disposition of surplus weapons-usable plutonium. The plan describes details of the development and testing (D&T) tasks needed to provide technical data for design and operation of a plutonium immobilization plant based on the ceramic can-in-canister technology (''Immobilization Fissile Material Disposition Program Final Immobilization Form Assessment and Recommendation'', UCRL-ID-128705, October 3, 1997). The plan also presents tasks for characterization and performance testing of the immobilization form to support a repository licensing application and to develop the basis for repository acceptance of the plutonium form. Essential elements of the plant project (design, construction, facility activation, etc.) are described, but not developed in detail, to indicate how the D&T results tie into the overall plant project. Given the importance of repository acceptance, specific activities to be conducted by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) to incorporate the plutonium form in the repository licensing application are provided in this document, together with a summary of how immobilization D&T activities provide input to the license activity. The ultimate goal of the Immobilization Project is to develop, construct, and operate facilities that will immobilize from about 18 to 50 tonnes (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons usable plutonium materials in a manner that meets the ''spent fuel'' standard (Fissile Materials Storage and Disposition Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, ''Storage and Disposition Final PEIS'', issued January 14, 1997, 62 Federal Register 3014) and is acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. In the can-in-canister technology, this is accomplished by encapsulating the plutonium-containing ceramic forms within large canisters of high level waste (HLW) glass. Deployment of the immobilization capability should occur by 2006 and be ...
Date: July 1, 1998
Creator: Kan, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Immobilization as a route to surplus fissile materials disposition

Description: In the aftermath of the Cold War, the US and Russia have agreed to large reductions in nuclear weapons. To aid in the selection of long-term management options, DOE has undertaken a multifaceted study to select options for storage and disposition of plutonium (Pu) in keeping with the national policy that Pu must be subjected to the highest standards of safety, security, and accountability. One alternative being considered is immobilization. To arrive at a suitable immobilization form, the authors first reviewed published information on high-level waste (HLW) immobilization technologies in order to identify 72 possible Pu immobilization forms to be prescreened. Surviving forms were screened using multiattribute analysis to determine the most promising technologies. Promising immobilization families were further evaluated to identify chemical, engineering, environmental, safety, and health problems that remain to be solved prior to making technical decisions as to the viability of using the form for long-term disposition of plutonium. All data, analyses, and reports are being provided to the DOE Fissile Materials Disposition Project Office to support the Record of Decision that is anticipated in the fourth quarter of FY96.
Date: April 27, 1995
Creator: Gray, L.W. & Kan, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Glass and ceramic immobilization alternatives and the use of new facilities

Description: The Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for placing weapons-usable surplus nuclear materials (principally plutonium [Pu] and highly enriched uranium [U]) in a form or condition that is substantially and inherently more difficult to use in weapons either by the Host Country or by a subnational group. The two most promising alternatives for achieving these aims are: fabrication and use as fuel, without reprocessing, in existing or modified nuclear reactors; or vitrification in combination with high-level radioactive waste. The mission of the immobilization technologies and facilities considered in this paper and the paper ``Use of Savannah River Site (SRS) Facilities for Glass and Ceramics,`` is to produce a waste form by incorporating plutonium in either an amorphous glass or a crystalline ceramic matrix and then disposal of it in a geologic repository. This paper summarizes all the glass and ceramic alternatives under consideration and presents the immobilization options using new facilities. The subsequent paper presents the immobilization options which use existing facilities at the Savannah River Site.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Kan, T. & Sullivan, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Status of immobilization for disposition of surplus fissile materials

Description: An international team was assembled for the purpose of selecting suitable immobilization forms and processing technologies for the Fissile Materials Deposition Program Office. As a reference point, the team used the NAS study but did not limit their recommendations to those of the NAS. As a result, two basic forms were selected and the processing alternatives to provide those two forms were defined. Environmental data have been supplied to support a preliminary environmental impact statement for the disposition program. The immobilization program has also entered the R&D Phase and progress has been made on the formulation of both glass and ceramic forms. Samples of both glass and ceramics containing tens of grams of plutonium have been prepared which indicate that the required concentration range can be obtained. Long-term leach tests to verify performance requirements in the repository are also under way.
Date: May 10, 1996
Creator: Gray, L.W. & Kan, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Safety aspects with regard to plutonium vitrification techniques

Description: Substantial inventories of excess plutonium are expected to result from dismantling US and Russian nuclear weapons. Disposition of this material should be a high priority in both countries. Various disposition options are under consideration. One option is to vitrify the plutonium with the addition of {sup 137}Cs or high-level waste to act as a deterrent to proliferation. The primary safety problem associated with vitrification of plutonium is to avoid criticality in form fabrication and in the final repository over geologic time. Recovery should be as difficult (costly) as the recovery of plutonium from spent fuel.
Date: May 11, 1995
Creator: Gray, L.W. & Kan, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plutonium Immobilization Project, Project Office Quality Assurance Program Description Revision 1

Description: ''The quality assurance activity involves the establishment and implementation of the Quality Assurance Program and the development of a Quality Assurance Plan and Procedures. Quality Assurance provides the plans, procedures and controls that are required for repository acceptance and the immobilization plant licensing and design activities.'' The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) has a policy that all development, testing and operational activities be planned and performed in accordance with its customer's needs and expectations, and with a commitment to excellence and continuous improvement. The Immobilization Development and Testing (D&T) Quality Assurance Program establishes implementation requirements which, when completed, will ensure that the program development and test activities conform to the appropriate QA requirements. In order for the program to be effective, a designated quality lead must be in place at the Project Office and each participating site.
Date: April 30, 1998
Creator: Kan, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Immobilization as a route to surplus fissile materials disposition. Revision 1

Description: The safe management of surplus weapons plutonium is a very important and urgent task with profound environmental, national and international security implications. In the aftermath of the Cold War, Presidential Police Directive 13 and various analysis by renown scientific, technical and international policy organizations have brought about a focused effort within the Department of Energy to identify and implement paths forward for the long term disposition of surplus weapons usable plutonium. The central, overarching goal is to render surplus weapons plutonium as inaccessible and unattractive for reuse in nuclear weapons, as the much larger and growing stock of plutonium contained in civilian spent reactor fuel. One disposition alternative considered for surplus Pu is immobilization, in which plutonium would be emplaced in glass, ceramic or glass-bonded zeolite. This option, along with some of the progress over the last year is discussed.
Date: March 15, 1996
Creator: Gray, L.W.; Kan, T. & McKibben, J.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plutonium disposition via immobilization in ceramic or glass

Description: The management of surplus weapons plutonium is an important and urgent task with profound environmental, national, and international security implications. In the aftermath of the Cold War, Presidential Policy Directive 13, and various analyses by renown scientific, technical, and international policy organizations have brought about a focused effort within the Department of Energy to identify and implement paths for the long term disposition of surplus weapons- usable plutonium. The central goal of this effort is to render surplus weapons plutonium as inaccessible and unattractive for reuse in nuclear weapons as the much larger and growing stock of plutonium contained in spent fuel from civilian reactors. One disposition option being considered for surplus plutonium is immobilization, in which the plutonium would be incorporated into a glass or ceramic material that would ultimately be entombed permanently in a geologic repository for high-level waste.
Date: March 5, 1997
Creator: Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; Shaw, H.F. & Armantrout, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Immobilization needs and technology programs

Description: In the aftermath of the Cold War, the US and Russia agreed to large reductions in nuclear weapons. To aid in the selection of long-term management options, DOE has undertaken a multifaceted study to select options for storage and disposition of plutonium in keeping with US policy that plutonium must be subjected to the highest standards of safety, security, and accountability. One alternative being considered is immobilization. To arrive at a suitable immobilization form, we first reviewed published information on high-level waste immobilization technologies and identified 72 possible plutonium immobilization forms to be prescreened. Surviving forms were further screened using multi-attribute utility analysis to determine the most promising technology families. Promising immobilization families were further evaluated to identify chemical, engineering, environmental, safety, and health problems that remain to be solved prior to making technical decisions as to the viability of using the form for long- term disposition of plutonium. From this evaluation, a detailed research and development plan has been developed to provide answers to these remaining questions.
Date: December 11, 1995
Creator: Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; Shaw, H. & Armantrout, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Disposition of surplus fissile materials via immobilization

Description: In the Cold War aftermath, the US and Russia have agreed to large reductions in nuclear weapons. To aid in the selection of long-term management options, the USDOE has undertaken a multifaceted study to select options for storage and disposition of surplus plutonium (Pu). One disposition alternative being considered is immobilization. Immobilization is a process in which surplus Pu would be embedded in a suitable material to produce an appropriate form for ultimate disposal. To arrive at an appropriate form, we first reviewed published information on HLW immobilization technologies to identify forms to be prescreened. Surviving forms were screened using multi-attribute utility analysis to determine promising technologies for Pu immobilization. We further evaluated the most promising immobilization families to identify and seek solutions for chemical, chemical engineering, environmental, safety, and health problems; these problems remain to be solved before we can make technical decisions about the viability of using the forms for long-term disposition of Pu. All data, analyses, and reports are being provided to the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition to support the Record of Decision that is anticipated in Summer of 1996.
Date: July 23, 1995
Creator: Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; Sutcliffe, W.G.; McKibben, J.M. & Danker, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Treatment technology analysis for mixed waste containers and debris

Description: A team was assembled to develop technology needs and strategies for treatment of mixed waste debris and empty containers in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, and to determine the advantages and disadvantages of applying the Debris and Empty Container Rules to these wastes. These rules issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) apply only to the hazardous component of mixed debris. Hazardous debris that is subjected to regulations under the Atomic Energy Act because of its radioactivity (i.e., mixed debris) is also subject to the debris treatment standards. The issue of treating debris per the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) at the same time or in conjunction with decontamination of the radioactive contamination was also addressed. Resolution of this issue requires policy development by DOE Headquarters of de minimis concentrations for radioactivity and release of material to Subtitle D landfills or into the commercial sector. The task team recommends that, since alternate treatment technologies (for the hazardous component) are Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT): (1) funding should focus on demonstration, testing, and evaluation of BDAT on mixed debris, (2) funding should also consider verification of alternative treatments for the decontamination of radioactive debris, and (3) DOE should establish criteria for the recycle/reuse or disposal of treated and decontaminated mixed debris as municipal waste.
Date: March 1, 1994
Creator: Gehrke, R. J.; Brown, C. H.; Langton, C. A.; Askew, N. M.; Kan, T. & Schwinkendorf, W. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department