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An Analysis of the Pedagogical Advantages Relating to Combined Study of Euphonium and Trombone through the Use of Specific Repertoire

Description: Doubling is defined as playing two instruments. It is becoming increasingly necessary for low brass musicians to double in the course of their careers. Euphoniumists often learn trombone, and trombonists learn euphonium. The instruments share several surface similarities but also differ in many significant ways. Interviews with six professional doublers highlight strategies for learning, teaching, and performing on both trombone and euphonium. Slide and valve technique, adjustment of intonation, tone quality, air usage, repertoire, and skill maintenance are all addressed. Trombone literature comprises a large part of the euphonium repertoire, due to the fact that most trombone pieces can be performed on euphonium. Euphoniumists should avoid playing pieces that require glissandi or extremely loud dynamics to be effective. Euphonium solos are generally too technical to be practical for trombonists to perform. Grøndahl's Concert pour trombone et piano ou orchestre is a standard piece for both instruments. When performing the piece on either instrument, it is helpful to practice the piece on both trombone and euphonium in order to tap into each instrument's strengths.
Date: August 2010
Creator: Lipton, Jamie
Partner: UNT Libraries

Philosophical Implications on Trombone Performance and Pedagogy in Andre Lafosse's Curriculum at the Paris Conservatory

Description: During his tenure as the professor of trombone at the Paris Conservatory, Andre Lafosse wrote the Traite de Pedagogie du Trombone a Coulisse addressing trombone pedagogy that was to be studied in conjunction with his method and etude books, Methode Complete de Trombone and Vade Mecum du Tromboniste. The pedagogic philosophy reflects Lafosse's own experiences as an orchestral musician in France in the early 20th century. Lafosse designed and used his treatise to prepare students to be effective teachers after their graduation from the Conservatory. The scope of preparation for Lafosse's trombone class, however, was limited. He did not attempt to provide a text or tutor that would prepare trombonists for any career in music: Lafosse was primarily concerned with orchestral trombone playing, as reflected in musical exercises, instrument designation, and repertoire references. Solo performance skills are also explained at length in his treatise, and Lafosse includes his own solo transcriptions in the curriculum. This emphasis placed on performing as a soloist appears to oppose Lafosse's implied preference for orchestral performance. Throughout his career as a trombone professor Andre Lafosse compiled and wrote music that emphasized elements of trombone technique based on the French solo and orchestral repertoire. His primary concern as a teacher was developing the skills for an orchestral career in France, but his method was to use exercises that focused on certain technical aspects of trombone performance. The exercises and etudes chosen were all influenced by French music regarding the skills deemed important by Lafosse (i.e. those required by the French orchestral and solo repertoire) and the acoustic design of the trombone in France in the early 20th century. Considering the holistic context of Lafosse'ss role at the Paris Conservatory, Lafosse's curriculum and methodology should be deemed appropriately designed for the best interest of the students. In ...
Date: May 2005
Creator: English, Bryan
Partner: UNT Libraries

Motives, Allusions, and Eclecticism: A Panametric Analysis of the First Movement of Christian Lindberg's Mandrake in the Corner Based on the Method of Jan LaRue

Description: For more than 20 years, Christian Lindberg has been internationally recognized as the premiere trombone soloist of our time. Few, however, are familiar with his compositions. For over ten years, he has composed many solo and ensemble works for trombone. Many prominent musical organizations in the world have performed Lindberg's music, including the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, and the University of North Texas Wind Ensemble. Today, Christian Lindberg has commission requests up to 2010. Christian Lindberg completed Mandrake in the Corner, a three movement concerto for trombone, in 1999. The purpose of this dissertation is to present an analysis of the first movement of Mandrake in the Corner to provide the first in depth study of Lindberg's compositional style. This analysis borrows freely from the method of Jan LaRue, which focuses on sound, harmony, melody, rhythm, and growth of musical structure on the small, middle, and large levels. The focus of this study centers on the aspects of melody, harmony, and rhythm to explain how the piece works despite the lack of a second theme or change of key in the first movement.
Date: May 2007
Creator: Underwood, Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries

Pedagogical Applications of Scat-singing Within the Jazz Trombone Studio

Description: This study investigates the pedagogical applications of scat-singing within the jazz trombone studio. In addition to the obvious ear-training benefits that the student player can gain from this synthesis, the palette of articulation subtleties and overall musically expressive qualities for trombonists can also be greatly enhanced. These commonalities will encompass the pedagogical focus of this document, utilizing performance recordings and publications by prominent jazz artists and writers to document existing teaching strategies as well as develop new concepts. The first section of this document presents an introduction that includes a historical overview of scat-singing, prominent scat-singing instrumentalists, and concepts and current literature. The second section presents selected biographies on Wycliffe Gordon and Bill Watrous, both prominent jazz trombonists who sing as well as play the trombone. The third section investigates jazz articulation, scat-singing articulation, and doodle-tongue articulation and their relevance to this topic. The fourth section explores musically expressive qualities as analyzed in Bill Watrous’ solo transcription of “Body and Soul.” The final section draws conclusions about the pedagogical applications of scat-singing within the jazz trombone studio and summarizes current teaching strategies. Although this document is not a performance guide, an informed performance of the concepts and examples contained herein is required.
Date: August 2014
Creator: Schneller, Aric Lewis
Partner: UNT Libraries

History and Current State of Performance of the Literature for Solo Trombone and Organ

Description: More than 200 compositions have been written for solo trombone and organ since the nineteenth century, including contributions from notable composers such as Franz Liszt, Gustav Holst, Gardner Read, Petr Eben, and Jan Koetsier. This repertoire represents a significant part of the solo literature for the trombone, but it is largely unknown to both trombonists and organists. The purpose of this document is to provide a historical perspective of this literature from the nineteenth century to the present, to compile a complete bibliography of compositions for trombone and organ, and to determine the current state of performance of this repertoire. This current state of performance has been determined through an internet survey, a study of recital programs printed in the ITA Journal, a study of recordings of this literature, and interviews and correspondence with well-known performers of these compositions. It is the intention of this author that this document will serve to make the repertoire for trombone and organ more accessible and more widely known to both trombonists and organists.
Date: August 2008
Creator: Pinson, Jr., Donald Lynn
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Critique of Etudes and Method Books for Advanced Euphoniumists: Status Quo and Future Recommendations

Description: Etudes and method books played had an important role in teaching technique and musicality for all musicians. Euphonium players have been using pedagogical materials originally written for other brass instruments such as trumpet, cornet, and trombone. Those materials have been very effective in helping euphoniumists learn skills to play idiomatic nineteenth and early twentieth century repertoire. In recent years, many solo pieces for euphonium demanding advanced techniques have been composed. The difficulty of these solo works for euphonium has increased dramatically in the second half of the twentieth century. Traditional etudes and method books do not cover all the necessary techniques to play this modern repertoire. In the last two decades, many collections of etudes have been written specifically for euphonium, and several of them are technically challenging and aimed at advanced euphoniumists. This trend can be seen in the United States, France and England. In this paper, traditional standard pedagogical materials currently used by euphoniumists will be evaluated. Recent publications of pedagogical materials written exclusively for euphonium after 1990 will be introduced, and effective uses of old and new pedagogical materials for current euphonium players will be presented. An annotated list of the latest etudes composed exclusively for euphonium will be provided at the end.
Date: May 2008
Creator: Saito, Mitsuru
Partner: UNT Libraries

“The Scherzo for Trombone Quartet” by John La Montaine: A Performer’s Edition

Description: In 1939, during his studies at the Eastman School of Music, John La Montaine (1920-2013) composed a Scherzo for four trombones. The Scherzo was revised more than 60 years later, becoming the third movement of a three-movement trombone quartet completed in 2001. Interestingly, the same Scherzo subsequently appeared in two of his later works: first the final movement of his Piano Concerto No. 4 Op. 59 (1989) and 12 years later as the final movement of a three-movement Trombone Quartet. The thesis presents a detailed account of the compositional history of the Scherzo, its connection to the first two movements, and a performance edition of the Scherzo based on my collaboration with the composer between for five years from 2003 to 2007.
Date: August 2014
Creator: Begnoche, David J.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Jean-michel Defaye’s Á La Maniére De Debussy Pour Trombone Et Piano: A Compositional Comparison To Claude Debussy’s Harmonic, Melodic, And Rhythmic Practices

Description: Jean-Michel Defaye composed Á La Maniére de Debussy in 2001 as part of a series of trombone solos written to emulate the compositional styles of significant predecessors. This study compares Á La Maniére de Debussy to the harmonic, melodic, and rhythmic practices of Claude Debussy (1862–1918), an innovative French composer and recognized figure of musical Impressionism. At present, there is limited scholarship on Defaye’s Á La Maniére de Debussy and its compositionally imitative nature. The first section of this document presents a survey of historical information, current literature, and methods of examination. The second section provides biographical information on composers Jean-Michel Defaye and Claude Debussy. The third section exhibits a compositional comparison of Á La Maniére de Debussy to Debussy’s use of harmony, melody, and rhythm. The final section draws a conclusion to the piece’s importance to the trombone solo repertoire and includes an interview with French trombonist Jacques Mauger who collaborated with Defaye on Á La Maniére de Debussy. Although this document is not a performance guide, an informed performance of Á La Maniére de Debussy requires a trombonist to understand Debussy’s unique treatment of harmony, melody, and rhythm.
Date: December 2011
Creator: Rader, Aaron Christian
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Collective Pedagogy Utilized By the Trombone Instructors at the Rotterdam Conservatory of the Netherlands

Description: The Collective Pedagogy Utilized by the Trombone Instructors at the Rotterdam Conservatory of the Netherlands offers a comprehensive study of the collaboration between the various instructors of the trombone studio within the Rotterdam Conservatory and their pedagogical approach to curriculum, lesson structure, grading process, student body, and social environment. the Rotterdam Conservatory has produced some of the finest trombonists in the global music community. Alumni from the conservatory consistently win positions in professional ensembles, succeed in national and international competitions, and are often featured artists at international music festivals. the success of their alumni warrants closer scrutiny of the pedagogical approach utilized by the faculty of the conservatory.
Date: May 2012
Creator: Wallace, Noel James
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Instrumental Music of Ida Gotkovsky: Finding Intertextual Meaning

Description: Ida Gotkovsky, a student of Olivier Messiaen and Nadia Boulanger, composed for nearly every instrument, voice, and ensemble. Although Gotkovsky's Concerto for Trombone is a monumental work for the trombone it is rarely performed and recordings are scarce. There is a general lack of scholarly attention to the music of Ida Gotkovsky, however, the technical and aesthetic quality of her music merits further examination. Previous studies of Gotkovsky's music focused on the analysis of individual compositions. However, much more can be learned by examining a work within the context of her general compositional output. Gotkovsky's compositional style includes extensive musical self-borrowing. The goal of this project is to demonstrate melodic and textural similarities and differences within her music to inform performance practice and to establish interest in her music. The context in which Gotkovsky reuses her music is significant and can provide additional musical insight. An informed awareness of her extensive use of self-quotation familiarizes the performer with her compositional language in a variety of musical settings. Such familiarity with her musical style leads to an improved and artistically educated performance.
Date: August 2010
Creator: Hunter, Steven K.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Transcription of Op. 94 Morceau de Concert, by Camille Saint-Saëns For Solo Bass Trombone and Brass Ensemble

Description: The transcription is an addition to the repertoire for brass ensemble and bass trombone. Consideration is given to the nineteenth-century orchestration treatises of Berlioz and Strauss as well as the twentieth-century texts of Erik Leidzén, Walter Piston, and Samuel Adler. The transcription process is shaped by the principles of these writers. The score is contained in the appendix.
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Date: May 2001
Creator: Woods, Christopher P.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Russian trumpet sonata: a study of selected representative sonatas for trumpet and piano with an historical overview of the Russian trumpet school

Description: The impact of training on virtual team effectiveness was assessed in five areas: communication, planning tasks and setting goals, solving problems and making decisions, resolving conflict, and responding to customer requirements. A 12-page survey was developed exploring all aspects of virtual teams. 180 surveys were distributed, 52 were returned representing 43 companies. Training led to higher effectiveness in planning tasks and setting goals, solving problems and making decisions, and conflict resolution, but not in communication and responding to customer requirements. Training may not solve all the problems that virtual teams will encounter; however, training will make the challenges easier to handle.
Date: May 2003
Creator: Akhmadullin, Iskander
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Influence Of Jazz On Timbre In Selected Compositions For Solo Trombone

Description: A significant body of solo literature for the trombone has been written in the last fifty years that draws as much from the jazz tradition as from that of European classical music. While much attention has been paid to these works' use of characteristic jazz rhythms, harmonies and melodic inflections, there has been little focus on timbre, the musical element that perhaps most readily distinguishes jazz from other styles of Western music. This paper focuses on the important role jazz timbres should play in a performer's interpretation of those works that are significantly influenced by jazz. It includes explorations of the significant differences in concepts of timbre between European classical music and jazz, some of the ways in which these timbral differences are produced, and methods by which performers can develop the skills necessary to produce these varied timbres. Particular attention is paid to the importance of timbre to idiomatically appropriate performances of two significant works from the solo trombone repertoire, Robert Suderburg's Night Set (Chamber Music III) and Richard Peaslee's Arrows of Time.
Date: December 2002
Creator: Aldag, Daniel J.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Contributions of Thomas G. Everett to Bass Trombone Repertoire, Literature, and Research.

Description: Thomas G. Everett's activities as a catalyst for bass trombone repertoire and scholarship are significant in the development of further research in the field, and in the development of new performance repertoire. An examination of Everett's life and musical influences precedes the detailing of his pursuits of new solo/chamber music for the bass trombone. A discussion of Everett's efforts in obtaining new performance repertoire by means of commission or request is followed by an examination of four pieces composed for Everett. The four pieces profiled are Sonata Breve by Walter Hartley, Prelude, Fugue, and Big Apple by Walter Ross, Everett Suite by Ulysses Kay, and 100 Bars for Tom Everett by András Szöllösy. Three of these four pieces, the Hartley, Ross, and Kay selections, are the repertoire for the performance recital portion of this research. Everett's contributions in the area of publication, including details of his Annotated Guide to Bass Trombone Literature are addressed as well as his role as founder of the International Trombone Association (ITA) and the implications of this organization's existence upon the growth of knowledge in the area of trombone pedagogy and performance. Two appendices account for the pieces in which Everett was involved in bringing to the repertoire. A third appendix is an annotated bibliography of Everett's trombone-related periodical publications.
Date: August 2002
Creator: Gassler, Christopher J.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Survey of the Solo and Chamber Works for Trumpet, Horn, Trombone, Euphonium and Tuba By the Hungarian Composer Frigyes Hidas

Description: Hidas composed more than 135 compositions. Of these 135 compositions 67 feature the trumpet, horn, trombone, euphonium, and tuba in a solo setting, a homogenous chamber setting, or a heterogeneous chamber setting. The first section of this project presents the significance of the topic, state of research, and methodology. Chapter one provides a narrative detailing the collaboration of Hidas with Gusztáv Höna and László Szabó, Sr. Chapter two provides a brief description of characteristics found in Hidas' compositions. Appendix A and B provides a survey of the 67 works for brass instruments that Hidas composed. Included in this survey is information pertaining to the title, editor, publisher and date of publication, total measures, duration, ranges, degree of difficulty, clefs, special effects/techniques, instrumentation, dedications, analytical information, general comments, recordings, and rental details.
Date: August 2013
Creator: Gill, Jonathan B.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Performance Issues Related to Soli by Carlos Chávez and Two Little Serious Pieces by Silvestre Revueltas, A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of Kennan, Stravinsky, Haydn, Hummel, Neruda, Stevens and Others

Description: Performance issues related to Soli by Carlos Chávez and Two Little Serious Pieces by Silvestre Revueltas. Chapters one and two provide a brief biography of each composer. Chapter three is an examination of their musical style and the influence that indigenous Indian music, popular music and nationalism had on their styles. Chapter four provides an investigation of Soli by Carlos Chávez, a chamber piece written for oboe, B-flat clarinet, bassoon and B-flat trumpet. Chapter five offers an examination of Two Little Serious Pieces by Silvestre Revueltas, a wind quintet for piccolo, oboe, C trumpet, B-flat clarinet and baritone saxophone. Chapters four and five contain an analysis of these pieces with regard to melodic and harmonic material, tonality, texture, range, phrase structure and form. Performance issues, such as tempo, dynamics, articulation, rhythm and style are likewise addressed with the result being an interpretive analysis of each piece. The final chapter offers a comparative analysis of Soli and Two Little Serious Pieces relative to the topics discussed in chapters four and five.
Date: May 2000
Creator: Hofer, Calvin D.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Interpretive performance techniques and lyrical innovations on the bass trombone: A study of recorded performances by George Roberts, "Mr. Bass Trombone."

Description: Nicknamed "Mr. Bass Trombone" for his role as a prominent, trailblazing recording artist, George Roberts (b. 1928) has often been recognized as redefining the role of the bass trombone in popular music as well as setting new standards for technical refinement and expressive possibilities of the instrument. Through two interviews and a comparison between ten recorded performances by Roberts and corresponding lead sheets, I make observations about Roberts' performance techniques and illustrate various examples of those techniques. The document includes 35 pp. of interview transcriptions.
Date: December 2006
Creator: Yeager, Jonathan K.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Supplemental Studies for Mastering Extended Techniques in Three Late Twentieth-Century Works for Solo Trombone: Luciano Berio's Sequenza V, Folke Rabe's Basta and Mark Phillips' T. Rex, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by Wagenseil, Grøndahl, Gotkovsky, and Others

Description: Many, if not most, student trombonists have perhaps had little or no previous experience with "extended techniques"-novel or unconventional modes of sound production. To address this deficiency of experience, this document sets forth a progressive sequence of descriptive explanations and supplementary studies, which are specifically designed to assist trombonists in mastering the particular extended techniques that will prepare them to perform three of the most popular late Twentieth-Century pieces for trombone that include extended techniques-Luciano Berio's Sequenza V, Folke Rabe's Basta, and Mark Phillips' T.Rex. Following the introductory chapter, the body of the document consists of three chapters, each of which deals with one of the three solos, presenting descriptive explanations of relevant extended techniques interspersed with performance commentary (solicited from prominent trombonists) and supplementary studies (composed by the author). The studies presented in each chapter are specifically geared toward mastering the extended techniques as they relate to the music of each particular solo. They are also especially focused toward learning the more difficult passages of music in each solo.
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Date: May 2004
Creator: Scott, Deb
Partner: UNT Libraries

From Deux Danses to Fluctuations: Compositional components and innovations in two solo trombone works of Jean-Michel Defaye.

Description: The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate and document the compositional components and innovations in the compositional style of Jean-Michel Defaye as they relate to two of his works for solo trombone, Deux Danses (1953, trombone and piano) and Fluctuations (1980, trombone solo, six trombones and two percussionists.) This document investigates the circumstances surrounding the creation of each piece as well as the compositional processes of Monsieur Defaye. Jean-Michel Defaye is an important composer for his commitment to the quality and challenge of the trombone literature he creates. The importance of Deux Danses is in the fact that it was this piece that put Defaye in the international spotlight. Solo works with chamber ensemble, such as Fluctuations, must be more seriously considered for performance if the standard solo repertoire for trombone is to be further expanded. Jazz style is an integral part of both of these important works and a necessary component to fully realize the composer's intent. Monsieur Defaye has demonstrated a commitment to composing for the instrument over the long term and has a sustained interest in participating in the further development of serious literature for all brass instruments. This study will add to the limited published material on Defaye and is intended to further the cause of research into the works of this important composer.
Date: August 2006
Creator: Flanigan, Sean Gerard
Partner: UNT Libraries

Gunther Schuller and John Swallow: Collaboration, Composition, and Performance Practice in Eine Kleine Posaunenmusik, with Three Recitals of Selected Works by Berio, Bogle, Gregson, Pryor, Suderburg and Others

Description: Gunther Schuller is credited with coining the term Third Stream, meaning compositions where twentieth-century art music forms exist simultaneously with jazz. Furthermore, Schuller specifically states in the liner notes to the debut recording of Eine Kleine Posaunenmusik "The work is not a Third Stream piece." Yet the concerto alludes to jazz through a multitude of slide glissandi and plunger mute effects, Solotone mute passages, specific references to the jazz trombone styles of Tommy Dorsey and Lawrence Brown, musical quoting or indirect reference, and the use of a walking bass line in Movement V, Finale. What makes one piece Third Stream and another simply a modern composition with jazz implications? Is Third Stream primarily a compositional designation or a performance practice stipulation? How does a celebrated trombone soloist inspire and collaborate with a distinguished composer in the creation of a major work? The somewhat conspicuous title, Eine Kleine Posaunenmusik, seems to point towards Mozart's famous string serenade Eine Kleine Nachtmusik. What connection to Mozart, if any, does Schuller's title suggest? All of these questions are elucidated in this study through careful investigation and research of Gunther Schuller's Eine Kleine Posaunenmusik. New interviews with John Swallow and Gunther Schuller are included.
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Date: May 2000
Creator: Bogle, James Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries

Carlos Guastavino’s Sonata Para Trombón O Trompa Y Piano: Analysis of Argentine Song and Formal Western Music Tradition Applied to Trombone Repertoire

Description: Very few Latin American pieces for trombone as a solo instrument have entered the canon of trombone repertoire worldwide, despite the large number of compositions in this medium. Therefore, when a major composer writes a full sonata for trombone efforts need to be made to bring these compositions to light. The Argentine composer Carlos Guastavino wrote a sonata for trombone and piano that is virtually unknown outside of Argentina, despite the composer’s importance. He is known for his artistic choice of cultivating a traditional romantic style of composition apart from the new tendencies and influences of the artistic novelties of the twentieth century. Guastavino’s artistic position is very clear in the sonata’s highly strict formal organization and Guastavino’s unique treatment of tonality and modality. He was also loyal to his own style as composer, which is ultimately an Argentine song style. He utilized the lyrical qualities of the trombone to convey the type of melodic approach that he used in his vocal works. This paper investigates the Argentine song and Western sonata conventions featured on Carlos Guastavino’s Sonata para Trombón o Trompa y Piano. The paper argues that these features represent his unique approach to musical composition in the twentieth century, thus making this sonata an important addition to the trombone repertoire.
Date: August 2014
Creator: Rego Borges, Lucas
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Solo Tenor Trombone Works of Gordon Jacob: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by L. Bassett, W. Hartley, B. Blacher, E. Bloch, D. White, F. David, G. Wagenseil, J. Casterede, L. Larson, and Others

Description: The three recitals consisted of performances of original eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth century solo works for trombone with the exception of Lyric Suite for Euphonium and Piano by Donald White, Divertimento for Trumpet, Trombone and Piano by Boris Blacher, and Dialogue and Dance for Trombone and Tuba by Newel Kay Brown. The premiere performance of Straight As An Arrow for B-flat-F Trombone and Prepared Tape by Ronn Cox and Dean Crocker was also included. After presenting a brief biography and discussing Gordon Jacob's (1895-1984) stylistic influences, the lecture continues with a Tonal, Motivic and Formal analysis of his three works for solo tenor trombone: Concerto for Trombone and Orchestra, Concertino for Trombone and Wind Orchestra, and the Trombone Sonata. Tonality, modality, polymodality and free association of pitches are elements that are present at one time or another in these compositions. Jacob's inclination for using the folk song style is evident in his writing, especially in the slow movements. Introductions, transition areas, and secondary themes, with tonally ambiguous harmonies and instrumental concepts of melodies, create a tension that is released by the return to tonality in the areas that follow. Treatment of rhythmic and melodic motives helps produce the special quality found in Gordon Jacob's compositions. Over half the themes in the works being investigated are built around motivic development. Neoclassicism results from the use of forms rooted in earlier centuries, but the choice of key centers gives these forms a new life. Jacob's composition of absolute music, as well as his use of the older compositional techniques of parallel harmonies and slow introductions, reflect neoclassical practices. The performance of Jacob's pieces is facilitated by his use of musical materials idiomatic to the instrument.
Date: May 1987
Creator: Tucker, Wallace E. (Wallace Edward)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Trombone Sonatas of Richard A. Monaco

Description: This lecture-recital investigated the music of Richard A. Monaco, especially the two sonatas for trombone (1958 and 1985). Monaco (1930-1987) was a composer, trombonist and conductor whose instrumental works are largely unpublished and relatively little known. In the lecture, a fairly extensive biographical chapter is followed by an examination of some of Monaco's early influences, particularly those in the music of Hunter Johnson and Robert Palmer, professors of Monaco's at Cornell University. Later style characteristics are discussed in a chapter which examines the Divertimento for Brass Quintet (1977), the Duo for Trumpet and Piano (1982), and the Second Sonata for Trombone and Piano (1985). The two sonatas for trombone are compared stylistically and for their position of importance in the composer's total output. The program included a performance of both sonatas in their entirety.
Date: December 1988
Creator: Seidel, John A. (John Allen)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Moravian Church and Its Trombone Choir in America, a Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by W. Presser, R. Monaco, L. Bassett, P. Bonneau, E. Bozza, R. Dillon and Others

Description: The purpose of the lecture was to investigate the historical and musical heritage of the Moravian Church, with a particular interest in the works and players of the American Moravian Trombone Choir. The historical overview of people, customs, and practices is traced from its beginnings with the Unitas Fratrum in Bohemia through the Northern Germany settlement of Herrenhut and the establishment of the American Moravian colony at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. The musical life of the church is represented by a discussion of the early hymns of the founding fathers in Bohemia and the subsequent instrumental music of the Moravian trombone choir in America. The trombone choir played chorales that were used to call the congregation to order, announce important visitors to the town, and provide music at special occasions. Anthems were played by trombones (when players were available) in regular church services, or outside when it was necessary to double voice parts. Concerted music was played in the Bethlehem Collegium Musicum. Biographies of the players of the 18th and 19th century trombone choirs provide information attesting to the proficiency and dedication of these musicians. A list of players who contributed to the trombone choir movement since the 19th century is included, as well as information about the popularity and function of the Moravian Trombone Choir today.
Date: August 1984
Creator: Branstine, Wesley R.
Partner: UNT Libraries