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Fossil Energy Materials Program conference proceedings

Description: The US Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy has recognized the need for materials research and development to assure the adequacy of materials of construction for advanced fossil energy systems. The principal responsibility for identifying needed materials research and for establishing a program to address these needs resides within the Office of Technical Coordination. That office has established the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR and TD) Fossil Energy Materials Program to fulfill that responsibility. In addition to the AR and TD Materials Program, which is designed to address in a generic way the materials needs of fossil energy systems, specific materials support activities are also sponsored by the various line organizations such as the Office of Coal Gasification. A conference was held at Oak Ridge, Tennessee on May 19-21, 1987, to present and discuss the results of program activities during the past year. The conference program was organized in accordance with the research thrust areas we have established. These research thrust areas include structural ceramics (particularly fiber-reinforced ceramic composites), corrosion and erosion, and alloy development and mechanical properties. Eighty-six people attended the conference. Papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)
Date: August 1, 1987
Creator: Judkins, R.R. (comp.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fossil Energy Program Annual Progress Report for April 1, 2002, Through March 31, 2003

Description: The mission of the Fossil Energy Program is to conduct research and development that contribute to the advancement of fossil energy technologies. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fossil Energy Program research and development activities, performed for the Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, cover the areas of coal, clean coal technology, gas, petroleum, and support to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Projects on the ORNL Fossil Energy Program are supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy, the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, the DOE Fossil Energy Clean Coal Technology Program, the DOE National Petroleum Technology Office, and the DOE Fossil Energy Office of Strategic Petroleum Reserve. The ORNL Fossil Energy Program shares with DOE Oak Ridge Operations technical management responsibility for all activities on the DOE Fossil Energy Advanced Research Materials Program. The Advanced Research Materials Program includes research at other DOE and government laboratories, at universities, and at industrial organizations.
Date: June 19, 2003
Creator: Judkins, RR
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials.

Description: The 18th Annual conference on Fossil Energy Materials was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on June 2 through June 4, 2004. The meeting was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy through the Advanced Research Materials Program (ARM). The objective of the ARM Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications, as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. The management of the program has been decentralized to the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The research is performed by staff members at ORNL and by researchers at other national laboratories, universities, and in private industry. The work is divided into the following categories: (1) structural, ceramics, (2) new alloys and coatings, (3) functional materials, and (4) technology development and transfer.
Date: November 2, 2004
Creator: Judkins, RR
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials

Description: The Fifteenth Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on April 30 through May 2, 2001. The meeting was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy through the Advanced Research Materials Program (ARM). The objective of the ARM Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications, as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. The management of the program has been decentralized to the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The research is performed by staff members at ORNL and by researchers at other national laboratories, universities, and in private industry. The work is divided into the following categories: (1) structural, ceramics, (2) new alloys and coatings, (3) functional materials, and (4) technology development and transfer. These proceedings were produced primarily from electronic files provided by the authors. They have been neither refereed nor extensively edited. However, most of the papers have already undergone technical review within the individual organizations before submission to the Program Office. The proceedings are available on the Fossil Energy home page at http://www.ornl.gov/fossil (Workshops and Conferences). The successful completion of the conference and publication of the proceedings has required help from several people. The organizers wish to thank Angela Beach of the ORNL Conference Office for her help in the many arrangements, and the numerous staff and support personnel associated with the conference. Finally, we express our sincere appreciation to the authors whose efforts are the very basis of the conference.
Date: February 12, 2002
Creator: Judkins, R.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nuclear fuel fabrication and refabrication cost estimation methodology

Description: The costs for construction and operation of nuclear fuel fabrication facilities for several reactor types and fuels were estimated, and the unit costs (prices) of the fuels were determined from these estimates. The techniques used in estimating the costs of building and operating these nuclear fuel fabrication facilities are described in this report. Basically, the estimation techniques involve detailed comparisons of alternative and reference fuel fabrication plants. Increases or decreases in requirements for fabricating the alternative fuels are identified and assessed for their impact on the capital and operating costs. The impact on costs due to facility size or capacity was also assessed, and scaling factors for the various captial and operating cost categories are presented. The method and rationale by which these scaling factors were obtained are also discussed. By use of the techniques described herein, consistent cost information for a wide variety of fuel types can be obtained in a relatively short period of time. In this study, estimates for 52 fuel fabrication plants were obtained in approximately two months. These cost estimates were extensively reviewed by experts in the fabrication of the various fuels, and, in the opinion of the reviewers, the estimates were very consistent and sufficiently accurate for use in overall cycle assessments.
Date: November 1, 1979
Creator: Judkins, R.R. & Olsen, A.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gel-sphere-pac reactor fuel fabrication and its application to a variety of fuels

Description: The gel-sphere-pac fuel fabrication option was evaluated for its possible application to commercial scale fuel fabrication for 19 fuel element designs that use oxide fuel in metal clad rods. The dry gel spheres are prepared at the reprocessing plant and are then calcined, sintered, inspected, and loaded into fuel rods and packed by low-energy vibration. A fuel smear density of 83 to 88% theoretical can be obtained. All fuel fabrication process steps were defined and evaluated from fuel receiving to finished fuel element shipping. The evaluation also covers the feasibility of the process, the current status of technology, estimates of the required time and cost to develop the technology to commercial status, and the safety and licensability of commercial scale plants. The primary evaluation was for a Light-Water Reactor fuel element containing (U,Pu)O/sub 2/ fuel. The other 18 fuel element types - 3 for Light-Water Reactors, 1 for a Heavy-Water Reactor, 1 for a Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor, 7 for Liquid-Metal-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactors, and 3 pairs for Light-Water Prebreeder and Breeder Reactors - were compared with the Light-Water Reactor. The gel-sphere-pac option was found applicable to 17 of the 19 element types; the characteristics of a commercial scale plant were defined for these for making cost estimates for such plants. The evaluation clearly shows the gel-sphere-pac process to be a viable fuel fabrication option. Estimates indicate a significant potential fabrication cost advantage for the gel-sphere-pac process if a remotely operated and remotely maintained fuel fabrication plant is required.
Date: December 1, 1979
Creator: Olsen, A.R. & Judkins, R.R. (comps.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fossil Energy Program semiannual progress report, April 1990-- September 1990

Description: This report covers progress made during the period April 1, 1990, through September 30, 1990, for research and development projects that contribute to the advancement of various fossil energy technologies. Topics discussed include: ceramics and composite materials R D, new alloys, corrosion and erosion research, coal conversion development, mild gasification. (VC)
Date: September 1, 1991
Creator: Judkins, R.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fossil Energy Program semiannual progress report, October 1990--March 1991

Description: This report covers progress made during the period October 1, 1990, through March 31, 1991, for research and development projects that contribute to the advancement of various fossil energy technologies. Projects on the Fossil Energy Program are supported by the DOE Office of Fossil Energy, the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, the DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, the DOE Fossil Energy Clean Coal Technology Program, the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the DOE Fossil Energy Office of Petroleum Reserves, the DOE Fossil Energy Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves, and the US Agency for International Development. The Fossil, Energy Program organization chart is shown in the appendix. Topics include: alloys, ceramics and composite research and development; corrosion and erosion research; environmental analysis and information systems; coal conversion development; mild gasification product characterization; coal combustion research; strategic petroleum reserve planning and modeling; and coal structure and chemistry.
Date: July 1, 1992
Creator: Judkins, R.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fossil Energy Program semiannual progress report for April 1992-- September 1992

Description: This report covers progress made during the period April 1, 1992, through September 30, 1992, for research and development projects that contribute to the advancement of various fossil energy technologies. Projects on the Fossil Energy Program are supported by the DOE Office of Fossil Energy, the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, the DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, the DOE Fossil Energy Clean Coal Technology Program, the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the DOE Fossil Energy Office of Petroleum Reserves, the DOE Fossil Energy Office of Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves, and the US Agency for International Development.
Date: December 1, 1992
Creator: Judkins, R.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fossil Energy Program semiannual progress report for April 1991 through September 1991

Description: This report covers progress made during the period April 1, 1991, through September 30, 1991, for research and development projects that contribute to the advancement of various fossil energy technologies. Projects on the Fossil Energy Program are supported by the DOE Office of Fossil Energy, the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, the DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, the DOE Fossil Energy Clean Coal Technology Program, the DOE Fossil Energy Office of Petroleum Reserves, and the US Agency for International Development (USAID). The Fossil Energy Program organization chart is shown in the appendix. Project discussed are: materials research and development; environmental analysis support; coal conversion development; coal combustion research; fossil fuel supplies modeling and research; evaluations and assessments; and coal structure and chemistry.
Date: October 1, 1992
Creator: Judkins, R.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A novel carbon fiber based material and separation technology

Description: Our novel carbon fiber based adsorbent material shows preferential uptake of CO[sub 2] over other gases. The material has a unique combination of properties, which include a large micropore volume, a large BET surface area, and electrical conductivity. These properties have been exploited to effect the separation of CO[sub 2] from a model gas (CH[sub 4]). Enhanced desorption is achieved using an electrical current passed through the material at low voltage. The manufacture, characterization, and CO[sub 2] adsorption behavior of the materials is reported here, along with our novel electrical swing separation technology.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Burchell, T.D. & Judkins, R.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fossil Energy Program annual progress report for April 1996 through March 1997

Description: The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fossil Energy Program research and development activities, performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, cover the areas of coal, clean coal technology, gas, petroleum, and support to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. The coal activities include materials research and development; environmental analysis support; bioprocessing of coal to produce liquid or gaseous fuels; and coal combustion research. The work in support of gas technologies includes activities on the Advanced Turbine Systems Program, primarily in the materials and manufacturing aspects. Several activities are contributing to petroleum technologies in the areas of computational tools for seismic analysis and the use of bioconversion for the removal of impurities from heavy oils. This report contains 32 papers describing the various research activities, arranged under the following topical sections: materials research and development; environmental analysis support; bioprocessing research; coal combustion research; fossil fuel supply modeling and research; and advanced turbine systems.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Judkins, R.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proceedings of the fourth annual conference on fossil energy materials

Description: The Fourth Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials was held in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on may 15--17, 1990. The meeting was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy through the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR TD) Materials Program, and ASM International. The objective of the AR TD Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. The work is divided into the following categories: (1) Ceramics, (2) New Alloys, (3) Corrosion and Erosion, and (4) Technology Assessment and Technology Transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.
Date: August 1, 1990
Creator: Judkins, R.R. & Braski, D.N. (comps.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proceedings of the fifth annual conference on fossil energy materials

Description: The Fifth Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials was held in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on May 14--16, 1991. The meeting was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy through the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR TD) Materials Program, and ASM International. The objective of the AR TD Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. The management of the Program has been decentralized to the DOE Field Office, Oak Ridge with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as the technical support contractor. The research is performed by staff members at ORNL and by a substantial number of researchers at other national laboratories, universities, and in private industry. The work is divided into the following categories: (1) Ceramics, (2) New Alloys, (3) Corrosion and Erosion, and (4) Technology Assessment and Technology Transfer. This conference is held every year to review the work on all of the projects of the Program. The agenda for the meeting is given in Appendix A, and a list of attendees is presented in Appendix B.
Date: September 1, 1991
Creator: Cole, N.C. & Judkins, R.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbon formation and metal dusting in hot-gas cleanup systems of coal gasifiers

Description: The product gas resulting from the partial oxidation of Carboniferous materials in a gasifier is typically characterized by high carbon and sulfur, but low oxygen, activities and, consequently, severe degradation of the structural and functional materials can occur. The objective of this task was to establish the potential risks of carbon deposition and metal dusting in advanced coal gasification processes by examining the current state of knowledge regarding these phenomena, making appropriate thermochemical calculations for representative coal gasifiers, and addressing possible mitigation methods. The paper discusses carbon activities, iron-based phase stabilities, steam injection, conditions that influence kinetics of carbon deposition, and influence of system operating parameters on carbon deposition and metal dusting.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Judkins, R.R.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Judkins, R.R.; DeVan, J.H. & Wright, I.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Metal filter materials in combustion environments

Description: Hot gas filtration in pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) systems has been proven below 750 C (1400 F). Advanced PFBC designs, focused on operational and efficiency improvements, will require filtration at higher temperatures. E.g., in first-generation advanced PFBCs, the filters will have to perform at 870 C (1600 F), while second-generation units, with both carbonizers for fuel-gas production and fluidized-bed combustors, will eventually require filters to operate up to 930 and 870 C (1700 and 1600 F). Results from the final test campaign at the Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project showed that at these higher temperatures, ceramic filter reliability may be problematical, so it will be of interest to re-examine the possibility of using advanced metal hot-gas filters for these advanced PFBC applications in view of the exceptional corrosion resistance of Fe aluminides in high-temperature sulfur-bearing atmospheres. For the second-generation PFBCs, performance criteria for the carbonizer filters are essentially the same as those for integrated gasification combined cycle systems (reducing environments). For the combustor, issues are similar to those of advanced first-generation units (oxidizing) except that the fuel (byproduct char from carbonizer) should be somewhat clearer and filter performance requirements less demanding than for PFBC systems such as the Tidd plant. For the carbonizer system, the nearer term (market entry) goals are to develop filter materials that will perform at 650-760 C (1200-1400 F), with an increase to 800-930 C (1500-1700 F) for improved cycle efficiency.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Judkins, R.R.; Tortorelli, P.F. & Wright, I.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The adsorption of water vapor on carbon fiber composite molecular sieve

Description: Carbon Fiber Composite Molecular Sieve (CFCMS) is a porous adsorbent carbon material manufactured from isotropic pitch derived carbon fibers and a phenolic resin binder via a slurry molding process. The material is produced in the form of a monolith and can be activated in steam, CO{sub 2} or O{sub 2}, during which it develops high BET surface areas and micropore volumes. The material has a continuous carbon skeletal structure and is, therefore, electrically conductive. The passage of an electric current at low voltage allows for direct resistive heating of the carbon and thus provides an efficient method of desorbing adsorbed gases. This method of separating gases has been named electrical swing adsorption (ESA) and is analogous to thermal or pressure swing adsorption. Recently, the authors have examined the potential of CFCMS/ESA for the adsorption and separation of water vapor. Frequently, water vapor must be removed from a gas stream before separation and processing can occur. To assess the potential of CFCMS for water adsorption a series of CFCMS samples were manufactured and activated to relatively high burn-off. Half of each sample was treated at 200 C in flowing oxygen to increase the number of chemisorbed surface functional groups. The amount of water adsorbed has previously been shown to be controlled by the availability of surface functional groups (such as carboxylic acid) which act as active sites for the adsorption of water. Here the authors report the preliminary study of the moisture adsorption behavior of treated and untreated CFCMS samples.
Date: November 1, 1998
Creator: Burchell, T.D.; Judkins, R.R. & Rogers, M.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A novel approach to the removal of CO{sub 2}

Description: The removal of CO{sub 2} from gas streams is becoming increasingly significant in the field of energy production. A porous monolithic activated carbon material (CFCMS) has been developed that is both strong and rigid, yet is permeable, and thus offers little resistance to the free-flow of fluids. The material has a unique combination of properties, including reasonable compressive strength, electrical conductivity, a large micropore volume, and a large CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity. At 30{degrees}C and atmospheric pressure, CFCMS has a CO{sub 2} uptake >100 mg/g. The uptake is reduced at elevated temperatures, dropping to {approximately}40 mg/g at 100{degrees}C. However, the CO{sub 2} uptake increases substantially with pressure, such that at 25{degrees}C and 58 bar the mass of CO{sub 2} adsorbed is >490 mg/g. The ability of CFCMS to selectively remove CO{sub 2} from a CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} gas mixture is demonstrated in a series of breakthrough experiments. The unique combination of properties of CFCMS has been exploited to effect the rapid desorption of CO{sub 2} under the influence of a low applied dc voltage.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Burchell, T.D.; Judkins, R.R.; Rogers, M.R. & Williams, A.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fossil Energy Program annual progress report for April 1997 through March 1998

Description: This report covers progress made on research and development projects that contribute to the advancement of fossil energy technologies, covering the areas of coal, clean coal technology, gas, petroleum, and support to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Papers are arranged under the following topical sections: materials research and development; environmental analysis support; bioprocessing research; fossil fuels supplies modeling and research; and oil and gas production.
Date: July 1, 1998
Creator: Judkins, R.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proceedings of the eleventh annual conference on fossil energy materials

Description: The objective of the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR and TD) Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. These proceedings contain 34 papers organized under the following topical sections: Ceramic composites and functional materials; Ceramics, new alloys, and functional materials; and New alloys. Also included is a summary of a workshop on materials issues in low emission boilers and in high efficiency coal-fired cycles. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Judkins, R.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of Inorganic Membranes for Hydrogen Separation

Description: This paper presents information and data relative to recent advances in the development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory of porous inorganic membranes for high-temperature hydrogen separation. The Inorganic Membrane Technology Laboratory, which was formerly an organizational element of Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, was formally transferred to Oak Ridge National Laboratory on August 1, 2002, as a result of agreements reached between Bechtel Jacobs Company, the management and integration contractor at the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant or Oak Ridge K-25 Site); UT-Battelle, the management and operating contractor of Oak Ridge National Laboratory; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office. Research emphasis during the last year has been directed toward the development of high-permeance (high-flux) and high-separation-factor metal-supported membranes. Performance data for these membranes are presented and are compared with performance data for membranes previously produced under this program and for membranes produced by other researchers. New insights into diffusion mechanisms are included in the discussion. Fifteen products, many of which are the results of research sponsored by the DOE Fossil Energy Advanced Research Materials Program, have been declared unclassified and have been approved for commercial production.
Date: April 23, 2003
Creator: Bischoff, B.L. & Judkins, R.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR TD) Materials Program semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1991

Description: The objective of the Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The Program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. Research is outlined in four areas: Ceramics, New Alloys, Corrosion and Erosion Research, and Technology Development and Transfer. (VC)
Date: April 1, 1992
Creator: Judkins, R.R. & Cole, N.C. (comps.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fuel cycle cost studies: fabrication, reprocessing, and refabrication of LWR, SSCR, HWR, LMFBR, and HTGR fuels

Description: The comparative analysis of power generation costs for the various reactor cycles that is being performed in the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) and the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE) requires that the costs associated with processing of fuel materials for use in these cycles be estimated. The study described here provided unit cost estimates for the fabrication, reprocessing, and refabrication of a variety of fuels for several reactor systems. We examined in detail the facility requirements and operations to estimate capital and operating costs. Unit processing cost determinations were based on a cash flow analysis technique in which income from sales over the life of each facility was equated to the total capital and operating expenses of that facility plus a specified return on equity investment. The effects of plant capacities were determined by application of scaling factors to individual components of the reference plant costs. Capital and operating costs were estimated for 21 reactor and fuel cycle combinations. Based on these estimates, unit costs were determined for fabrication, reprocessing, and refabrication of the fuels. In each instance, the effect of plant capacities on unit costs associated with the processing of fuels was determined. All costs were based on mature industries, and first-of-a-kind costs were not included. Unit cost determinations were based on three financing techniques, which included government financing, typical industrial financing, and high-risk industrial financing. The unit costs recommended for the comparative analysis of power generation costs are those associaated with the economic assumptions of a typical industry.
Date: March 1, 1979
Creator: Olsen, A.R.; Judkins, R.R.; Carter, W.L. & Delene, J.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proceedings of the sixth annual conference on fossil energy materials

Description: The Sixth Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials was held in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on May 12--14, 1992. The meeting was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy through the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR TD) Materials Program, and ASM International. The objective of the AR TD Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. The management of the Program has been decentralized to the DOE Field Office, Oak Ridge with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as the technical support contractor. The research is performed by staff members at ORNL and by a substantial number of researchers at other national laboratories, universities, and in private industry. The work is divided into the following categories: (1) ceramics, (2) development and corrosion resistance of iron aluminide, advanced austenitic and chromium-niobium alloys, and (3) technology assessment and technology transfer. This conference is held each year to review the work on all of the projects of the Program. The agenda for the meeting is given in Appendix A, and a list of attendees is presented in Appendix B. ASM International cosponsored the conference, for which we are especially grateful.
Date: July 1, 1992
Creator: Cole, N.C. & Judkins, R.R. (comps.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department