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Detection of pulsed, bremsstrahlung-induced, prompt neutron capture gamma-rays with HPGe detector

Description: The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is developing a novel photoneutron-based nondestructive evaluation technique which uses a pulsed, high-energy (up to 8-MeV) electron accelerator and gamma-ray spectrometry. Highly penetrating pulses of bremsstrahlung photons are produced by each pulse of electrons. Interrogating neutrons are generated by the bremsstrahlung photons interacting within a photoneutron source material. The interactions of the neutrons within a target result in the emission of elemental characteristic gamma-rays. Spectrometry is performed by analyzing the photoneutron-induced prompt gamma-rays acquired between accelerator pulses with a unique, high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray detection system using a modified transistor reset preamplifier. The detection system, the experimental configuration, and the accelerator operation used to characterize the detection system performance are described. Using a 6.5 MeV electron accelerator and a beryllium metal photoneutron source, gamma-ray spectra were successfully acquired for Al, Cu, polyethylene, NaC1, and depleted uranium targets as soon as 30 {mu}s after each bremsstrahlung (or x-ray) flash.
Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Jones, J.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improving tag/seal technologies: the vulnerability assessment component

Description: The Department of Energy (DOE), specifically the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security, has sponsored the development of numerous tag and seal technologies for high-security/high-valued applications. One important component in this technology development effort has been the continuous integration of vulnerability assessments. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been the lead laboratory for vulnerability assessments of fiber-optic-based tag/seal technologies. This paper presents a brief historical overview and the current status of the DOE high-security tag/seal development program and discusses INEL`s adversarial role and assessment philosophy. Verification testing criteria used to define ``successful`` tampering attempts/attacks are discussed. Finally, the advantages of integrating a vulnerability assessment into the development of commercial security tag/seals are presented.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Jones, J.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lysimeters at the Hanford Site: present use and future needs

Description: Lysimeters have been built and used at the Hanford Site for a variety of reasons, including the assessment of recharge (drainage) rates, biointrusion studies, the development of shallow-land burial monitoring and measurement methods, radionuclide transport studies, evapotranspiration studies, and field-scale waste-form leaching tests. A common feature of lysimeters is that they provide a way either to directly measure or to estimate water balance parameters such as soil-water storage changes, evapotranspiration, and drainage for a given site. The number of water balance parameters and the precision with which they can be measured vary depending on the design features of the lysimeter. In this report we describe key design features of the six major lysimeters facilities at Hanford and the types of data available from them. We also address the deficiencies of the present facilities for adequately determining recharge rates and propose additional facilities to evaluate protective barrier systems and arid-land water dynamics. 44 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.
Date: October 1, 1985
Creator: Gee, G.W. & Jones, J.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preparation of a cost data bank for DOE/Biomass Energy Systems Branch

Description: This study deals with the preparation of a biomass conversion technology and cost data bank for the Biomass Energy Systems Branch (BES) of DOE/SOLAR. When completed, it may be used with an appropriate methodology to analyze the complex issues of research program planning and analysis. In addition, future market penetration of BES products may be projected, and the options available to the Federal Government to influence the outcome of BES products marketing may also be examined.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Kam, A.Y.; Dickenson, R.L. & Jones, J.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bremsstrahlung versus Monoenergetic Photon Dose and Photonuclear Stimulation Comparisons At Long Standoff Distances

Description: Energetic photon sources with energies greater than 6 MeV continue to be recognized as viable source for various types of inspection applications, especially those related to nuclear and/or explosive material detection. These energetic photons can be produced as a continuum of energies (i.e., bremsstrahlung distribution) or as a set of one or more discrete photon energies (i.e., monoenergetic distribution). This paper will provide a follow-on extension of the photon dose comparison presented at the 9th International Conference on Applications of Nuclear Techniques (June 2008). The latter paper showed the comparative advantages and disadvantages of the photon doses provided by these two energetic interrogation sources and highlighted the higher energy advantage of the bremsstrahlung source, especially at long standoff distances (i.e., distance from source to the inspected object). Specifically, this paper will pursue this higher energy photon inspection advantage (up to 100 MeV) by providing dose and stimulated photonuclear interaction predictions for air and an infinitely dilute interrogated material (used for comparative interaction rate assessments since it excludes material self-shielding) as the interrogation object positioned forward on the inspection beam axis at increasing standoff distances. In addition to the direct energetic photon-induced stimulation, the predictions will identify the importance of any secondary downscattered/attenuated source-term effects arising from the photon transport in the intervening atmosphere. *Supported in part by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office under Contract Number DE-AC07-05ID14517.
Date: June 1, 2009
Creator: Jones, J. L.; Sterbentz, J.W. & Yoon, W.Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

TMAP2000 Use

Description: The TMAP Code was written in the late 1980s as a tool for safety analysis of systems involving tritium. Since then it was upgraded to TMAP4 and used in numerous applications including experiments supporting fusion safety predictions for advanced systems such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), and estimates involving tritium production technologies. Its further upgrade to TMAP2000 was accomplished in response to several needs. TMAP and TMAP4 had the capacity to deal with only a single trap for diffusing gaseous species in solid structures. TMAP2000 has been revised to include up to three separate traps and to keep track separately of each of up to 10 diffusing species in each of the traps. A difficulty in the original code dealing with heteronuclear molecule formation such as HD and DT has been removed. Under equilibrium boundary conditions such as Sieverts' law, TMAP2000 generates heteronuclear molecular partial pressures when solubilities and partial pressures of the homonuclear molecular species and the equilibrium stoichiometry are provided. A further sophistication is the addition of non-diffusing surface species and surface binding energy dynamics options. Atoms such as oxygen or nitrogen on metal surfaces are sometimes important in molecule formation with diffusing hydrogen isotopes but do not themselves diffuse appreciably in the material. TMAP2000 will accommodate up to 30 such surface species, allowing the user to specify relationships between those surface concentrations and populations of gaseous species above the surfaces. Additionally, TMAP2000 allows the user to include a surface binding energy and an adsorption barrier energy and includes asymmetrical diffusion between the surface sites and regular diffusion sites in the bulk. All of the previously existing features for heat transfer, flows between enclosures, and chemical reactions within the enclosures have been retained, but the allowed problem size and complexity have been significantly increased to take ...
Date: October 31, 2000
Creator: Longhurst, G.R.; Merrill, B.J. & Jones, J.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of the Natick enzymatic hydrolysis process for use in the production of ethanol from municipal solid waste or from wood. Final report

Description: Economic evaluation of a conceptual, large-scale, commercial ethanol production facility using the enzymatic hydrolysis technology are presented. Designs and cost estimates for the mechanical processing and the ethanol fermentation and recovery are included. Production of ethanol from both wood and solid wastes is covered. (MHR)
Date: October 1, 1979
Creator: Jones, J. L.; Fong, W. S. & Chatterjee, A. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simplified risk model support for environmental management integration

Description: This paper summarizes the process and results of human health risk assessments of the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex-wide programs for high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level, mixed low-level waste, and spent nuclear fuel. The DOE baseline programs and alternatives for these five material types were characterized by disposition maps (material flow diagrams) and supporting information in the May 1997 report `A Contractor Report to the Department of Energy on Environmental Baseline Programs and Integration Opportunities` (Discussion Draft). Risk analyses were performed using the Simplified Risk Model (SRM), developed to support DOE Environmental Management Integration studies. The SRM risk analyses consistently and comprehensively cover the life cycle programs for the five material types, from initial storage through final disposition. Risk results are presented at several levels: DOE complex-wide, material type program, individual DOE sites, and DOE site activities. The detailed risk results are documented in the February 1998 report `Human Health Risk Comparisons for Environmental Management Baseline Programs and Integration Opportunities` (Discussion Draft).
Date: March 1, 1998
Creator: Eide, S.A.; Jones, J.L. & Wierman, T.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Human health risk comparisons for environmental management baseline program and integration opportunities (discussion draft)

Description: This report documents the process and results of human health risk assessments of the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex-wide programs for high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, mixed low-level waste, and spent nuclear fuel. The DOE baseline programs and alternatives for these five material types were characterized by disposition maps (system flow diagrams) and supporting information in the May 1997 report A Contractor Report to the Department of Energy on Environmental Baseline Programs and Integration Opportunities (Discussion Draft). Risk analyses were performed using the Simplified Risk Model (SRM), developed to support DOE Environmental Management (EM) integration studies. The SRM risk analyses consistently and comprehensively cover the entire programs for the five material types, from initial storage through final disposition. Risk results are presented at several levels: DOE complex-wide, material type program, individual DOE sites, and DOE site activities.
Date: February 1, 1998
Creator: Eide, S.A.; Jones, J.L. & Wierman, T.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Material Identification Technology (MIT) concept technical feasibility study

Description: The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has initiated the design and development of a novel pulsed accelerator-based, active interrogation concept. The proposed concept, referred to as the Material Identification Technology (MIT), enables rapid (between accelerator pulses), non-destructive, elemental composition analysis of both nuclear and non-nuclear materials. Applications of this technique include material monitoring in support of counter-proliferation activities, such as export controls (at domestic and international inspection locations), SNM controls, nuclear weapon dismantlement, and chemical weapon verification. Material Identification Technology combines a pulsed, X-ray source (an electron accelerator) and a gamma detection system. The accelerator must maximize neutron production (pulse width, beam current, beam energy, and repetition rate) and minimize photon dose to the object. Current available accelerator technology can meet these requirements. The detection system must include detectors which provide adequate gamma energy resolution capability, rapid recovery after the initial X-ray interrogation pulse, and multiple single gamma event detection between accelerator pulses. Further research is required to develop the detection system. This report provides the initial feasibility assessment of the MIT concept.
Date: September 1, 1993
Creator: Jones, J.L.; Harker, Y.D.; Yoon, W.Y. & Johnson, L.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pulsed photoneutron interrogation: The GNT demonstration system

Description: The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has developed and tested an active photon interrogation technique to support the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of National Security and Nonproliferation (NN) mission related to verification technologies development. The INEL concept, referred to as the Gamma-Neutron Threshold (GNT) technology, uses a transportable, field-deployable, selective-energy (2 to 10 MeV), pulsed, electron accelerator to produce energetic X-rays having a bremsstrahlung spectrum. The energetic X-rays induce neutrons in many proliferation-limited items via direct photoneutron/photofission interactions. The time-dependent neutron response, as a function of the electron beam energy, is measured with a tripod-mounted, detector assembly and a portable data acquisition system. The portable detector assembly has been specifically designed to operate in very intense, pulsed X-ray environments. The GNT technique measures both the prompt and delayed neutron emission after each accelerator pulse. This report fully describes each component of this system and presents various signature results based on these emissions.
Date: October 1, 1994
Creator: Jones, J.L.; Harker, Y.D.; Yoon, W.Y.; Hoggan, J.M. & McManus, G.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coincidence/Multiplicity Photofission Measurements

Description: An series of experiments using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) photonuclear inspection system and a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)-supplied, list-mode data acquisition method have shown enhanced performance utilizing pulsed photofission-induced, neutron coincidence counting between pulses of an up-to-10-MeV electron accelerator for nuclear material detection and identification. The enhanced inspection methodology has applicability to homeland security, treaty-related support, and weapon dismantlement applications. For the latter, this technology can directly support of Department of Energy/NA241 programmatic mission objectives relative to future Rocky Ridge-type testing campaigns for active inspection systems.
Date: September 1, 2009
Creator: Jones, J.L.; Swinhoe, M.T.; Tobin, S.J.; Geist, W. H.; Norman, D.R.; Rothrock, R.B. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Utilization of Actively-induced, Prompt Radiation Emission for Nonproliferation Applications

Description: The pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) technique, which has demonstrated the ability to detect shielded nuclear material, is based on utilizing delayed neutrons and photons between accelerator pulses. While most active interrogation systems have focused on delayed neutron and gamma-ray signatures, the current requirements of various agencies necessitate bringing faster detection and acquisition capabilities to field inspection applications. This push for decreased interrogation times, increased sensitivity and mitigation of false positives requires that detection systems take advantage of all available information. Collaborative research between Idaho National Lab (INL), Idaho State University’s Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), has focused on exploiting actively-induced, prompt radiation signatures from nuclear material within a pulsed photonuclear environment. To date, these prompt emissions have not been effectively exploited due to difficulties in detection and signal processing inherent in the prompt regime as well as an overall poor understanding of the magnitude and yields of these emissions. Exploitation of prompt radiation (defined as during an accelerator pulse/(photo) fission event and/or immediately after (< l ms)) has the potential to dramatically reduce interrogation times since the yields are more than two orders of magnitude greater than delayed emissions. Recent preliminary experiments conducted at the IAC suggest that it is indeed possible to extract prompt neutron information within a pulsed photon environment. Successful exploitation of prompt emissions is critical for the development of an improved robust, high-throughput, low target dose inspection system for detection of shielded nuclear materials.
Date: August 1, 2006
Creator: Blackburn, F. W.; Jones, J. L.; Moss, C. E.; Mihalzco, J. T.; Hunt, A. W. & Harmon, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Time-Dependent Delayed Signatures From Energetic Photon Interrogations

Description: A pulsed photonuclear interrogation environment is rich with time-dependent, material specific, radiation signatures. Exploitation of these signatures in the delayed time regime (>1us after the photon flash) has been explored through various detection schemes to identify both shielded nuclear material and nitrogen-based explosives. Prompt emission may also be invaluable for these detection methods. Numerical and experimental results, which utilize specially modified neutron and HpGe detectors, are presented which illustrate the efficacy of utilizing these time-dependent signatures. Optimal selection of the appropriate delayed time window is essential to these pulsed inspection systems. For explosive (ANFO surrogate) detection, both numerical models and experimental results illustrate that nearly all 14N(n,y) reactions have occurred within l00 us after the flash. In contrast, however, gamma-ray and neutron signals for nuclear material detection require a delay of several milliseconds after the photon pulse. In this case, any data collected too close to the photon flash results in a spectrum dominated by high energy signals which make it difficult to discern signatures from nuclear material. Specifically, two short-lived, high-energy fission fragments (97Ag(T1/2=5.1 s) and 94Sr(T1/2=75.2 s)) were measured and identified as indicators of the presence of fissionable material. These developments demonstrate that a photon inspection environment can be exploited for time-dependent, material specific signatures through the proper operation of specially modified detectors.
Date: August 1, 2006
Creator: Norman, D. R.; Jones, J. L.; Blackburn, B. W.; Watson, S. M. & Haskell, K. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proof-of-Concept Assessment of a Photofission-Based Interrogation System for the Detection of Shielded Nuclear Material

Description: A photonuclear interrogation method was experimentally assessed for the detection of shielded nuclear materials. Proof-of-Concept assessment was performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) TA-18 facility and used the INEEL VARITRON electron accelerator. Experiments were performed to assess and characterize the delayed neutron emission responses for different nuclear materials with various shield configurations using three ''nominal'' electron beam energies; 8-, 10-, and 11-MeV. With the exception of highly enriched uranium (HEU), the nuclear materials assessed represent material types commonly encountered in commerce. The specific nuclear materials studied include a solid 4.8-kg HEU sphere, a 5-kg multiple-object, depleted uranium (DU) [uranium with about 0.2% enrichment with U-235] target, and two 11-kg thorium disks. The shield materials selected include polyethylene, borated-polyethylene, and lead. Experimental results, supported with numerical predictions, have shown that the photonuclear interrogation technique is quite capable of detecting shielded nuclear material via the direct measurement of the photofission-induced delayed neutron emissions. To identify or discriminate between nuclear material types (i.e., depleted uranium, HEU, and thorium), a ratio of delayed neutron counts at two different beam energies is utilized. This latter method, referred to as the dual-beam energy ratio Figure-of-Merit, allows one to differentiate among the three nuclear material types.
Date: November 1, 2000
Creator: Jones, J. L.; Yoon, W. Y.; Harker, Y. D.; Hoggan, J. M.; Haskell, K. J. & VanAusdeln, L. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Detection of Shielded Nuclear Material in a Cargo Container

Description: The Idaho National Laboratory, along with Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Idaho State University’s Idaho Accelerator Center, are developing electron accelerator-based, photonuclear inspection technologies for the detection of shielded nuclear material within air-, rail-, and especially, maritime-cargo transportation containers. This paper describes a developing prototypical cargo container inspection system utilizing the Pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) technology, incorporates interchangeable, well-defined, contraband shielding structures (i.e., "calibration" pallets) providing realistic detection data for induced radiation signatures from smuggled nuclear material, and provides various shielded nuclear material detection results. Using a 4.8-kg quantity of depleted uranium, neutron and gamma-ray detection responses are presented for well-defined shielded and unshielded configurations evaluated in a selected cargo container inspection configuration. © 2001 Elsevier Science. All rights reserved
Date: June 1, 2005
Creator: Jones, J. L.; Norman, D. R.; Haskell, K. J.; Sterbentz, J. W.; Yoon, W. Y.; Watson, S. M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Enhanced Photofission-based, Coincidence/Multiplicity Inspection Measurements

Description: An enhanced active interrogation system has been developed that integrates a transportable Idaho National Laboratory (INL) photonuclear inspection system, using a pulsed bremsstrahlung source and a reconfigurable neutron detection system, with a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) list-mode data acquisition system. A series of active interrogation experiments have shown enhanced nuclear material detection and identification utilizing pulsed photofission-induced, neutron coincidence/multiplicity counting between pulses of an up-to-10-MeV electron accelerator. This paper describes the integrated inspection system and presents some key shielded and unshielded nuclear material inspection results. The enhanced inspection methodology has applicability to homeland security and possible nuclear weapon dismantlement treaties.
Date: July 1, 2010
Creator: Jones, J.L.; Norman, D.R.; Haskell, K.J.; Swinhoe, M.T.; Tobin, S.J.; Geist, W.H. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) Technique: CY 04 Year-end Progress Report

Description: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), along with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Idaho State University’s Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), are developing an electron accelerator-based, photonuclear inspection technology for the detection of smuggled nuclear material within air-, rail-, and especially, maritime-cargo transportation containers. This CY04 report describes the latest developments and progress with the development of the Pulsed, Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) nuclear material inspection ystem, such as: (1) the identification of an optimal range of electron beam energies for interrogation applications, (2) the development of a new “cabinet safe” electron accelerator (i.e., Varitron II) to assess “cabinet safe-type” operations, (3) the numerical and experimental validation responses of nuclear materials placed within selected cargo configurations, 4) the fabrication and utilization of Calibration Pallets for inspection technology performance verification, 5) the initial technology integration of basic radiographic “imaging/mapping” with induced neutron and gamma-ray detection, 6) the characterization of electron beam-generated photon sources for optimal performance, 7) the development of experimentallydetermined Receiver-Operator-Characterization curves, and 8) several other system component assessments. This project is supported by the Department of Homeland Security and is a technology component of the Science & Technology Active Interrogation Portfolio entitled “Photofission-based Nuclear Material Detection and Characterization.”
Date: May 1, 2005
Creator: Jones, J.L.; Yoon, W.Y.; Haskell, K.J.; Norman, D.R.; Zabriskie, J.M.; Sterbentz, J.W. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Systems analysis programs for Hands-on integrated reliability evaluations (SAPHIRE) Version 5.0: Verification and validation (V&V) manual. Volume 9

Description: A verification and validation (V&V) process has been performed for the System Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluation (SAPHIRE) Version 5.0. SAPHIRE is a set of four computer programs that NRC developed for performing probabilistic risk assessments. They allow an analyst to perform many of the functions necessary to create, quantify, and evaluate the risk associated with a facility or process being analyzed. The programs are Integrated Reliability and Risk Analysis System (IRRAS) System Analysis and Risk Assessment (SARA), Models And Results Database (MAR-D), and Fault tree, Event tree, and Piping and instrumentation diagram (FEP) graphical editor. Intent of this program is to perform a V&V of successive versions of SAPHIRE. Previous efforts have been the V&V of SAPHIRE Version 4.0. The SAPHIRE 5.0 V&V plan is based on the SAPHIRE 4.0 V&V plan with revisions to incorporate lessons learned from the previous effort. Also, the SAPHIRE 5.0 vital and nonvital test procedures are based on the test procedures from SAPHIRE 4.0 with revisions to include the new SAPHIRE 5.0 features as well as to incorporate lessons learned from the previous effort. Most results from the testing were acceptable; however, some discrepancies between expected code operation and actual code operation were identified. Modifications made to SAPHIRE are identified.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Jones, J.L.; Calley, M.B.; Capps, E.L.; Zeigler, S.L.; Galyean, W.J.; Novack, S.D. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) Technique: CY-05 Project Summary Report

Description: Idaho National Laboratory, along with Idaho State University’s Idaho Accelerator Center and Los Alamos National Laboratory, is developing an electron accelerator-based, photonuclear inspection technology, called the Pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) system, for the detection of nuclear material concealed within air-, rail-, and, primarily, maritime-cargo transportation containers. This report summarizes the advances and progress of the system’s development in 2005. The contents of this report include an overview of the prototype inspection system, selected Receiver-Operator-Characteristic curves for system detection performance characterization, a description of the approach used to integrate the three major detection components of the PPA inspection system, highlights of the gray-scale density mapping technique being used for significant shield material detection, and higher electron beam energy detection results to support an evaluation for an optimal interrogating beam energy. This project is supported by the Department of Homeland Security Office of Research and Development and, more recently, the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office.
Date: December 1, 2005
Creator: Jones, J.L.; Bennett, B.D.; Haskell, K.J.; Johnson, J.T.; Norman, D.R.; Sterbentz, J.W. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department