27 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Summary Report For The Analysis Of The Sludge Batch 7b (Macrobatch 9) DWPF Pour Stream Glass Sample For Canister S04023

Description: In order to comply with the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Waste Form Compliance Plan for Sluldge Batch 7b, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel characterized the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) pour stream (PS) glass sample collected while filling canister S04023. This report summarizes the results of the compositional analysis for reportable oxides and radionuclides and the normalized Product Consistency Test (PCT) results. The PCT responses indicate that the DWPF produced glass that is significantly more durable than the Environmental Assessment glass.
Date: November 18, 2013
Creator: Johnson, F. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SUMMARY REPORT FOR THE ANALYSIS OF THE SLUDGE BATCH 6 (MACROBATCH 7) DWPF POUR STREAM GLASS SAMPLE FOR CANISTER S03472

Description: In order to comply with the Waste Acceptance Specifications in Sludge Batch 6 (Macrobatch 7), Savannah River National Laboratory personnel performed characterization analyses on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) pour stream glass sample collected while filling canister S03472. This report summarizes results of the characterization, which indicate that the DWPF produced glass that is significantly more durable than the Environmental Assessment glass. Results and further details are documented in 'Analysis of DWPF Sludge Batch 6 (Macrobatch 7) Pour Stream Glass Samples,' SRNL-STI-2011-00555.
Date: January 23, 2012
Creator: Johnson, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SUMMARY REPORT FOR THE ANALYSIS OF THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8) DWPF POUR STREAM GLASS SAMPLE FOR CANISTER S03619

Description: In order to comply with the Waste Acceptance Specifications in Sludge Batch 7a (Macrobatch 8), Savannah River National Laboratory personnel characterized the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) pour stream glass sample collected while filling canister S03619. This report summarizes the results of the compositional analysis for reportable oxides and radionuclides, and the normalized Product Consistency Test (PCT) results. The PCT responses indicate that the DWPF produced glass that is significantly more durable than the Environmental Assessment glass. Results and further details are documented in 'Analysis of DWPF Sludge Batch 7a (Macrobatch 8) Pour Stream Samples,' SRNL-STI-2012-00017.
Date: May 1, 2012
Creator: Johnson, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ANALYSIS OF DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 6 (MACROBATCH 7) POUR STREAM GLASS SAMPLES

Description: The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), also referred to as Macrobatch 7 (MB7), in June 2010. SB6 is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5), H-Canyon Np transfers and SB6 that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51.1 SB6 was processed using Frit 418. Sludge is received into the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) and is processed through the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator Tank (SME). The treated sludge slurry is then transferred to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) and fed to the melter. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP) and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. The DWPF requested various analyses of radioactive glass samples obtained from the melter pour stream during processing of SB6 as well as reduction/oxidation (REDOX) analysis of MFT samples to determine the impact of Argon bubbling. Sample analysis followed the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) and an Analytical Study Plan (ASP). Four Pour Stream (PS) glass samples and two MFT slurry samples were delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from the DWPF. Table 1-1 lists the sample information for each pour stream glass sample. SB6 PS3 (S03472) was selected as the official pour stream sample for SB6 and full analysis was requested. This report details the visual observations of the as-received SB6 PS No.3 glass sample as well as results for the chemical composition, Product Consistency Test (PCT), radionuclide content, noble metals, and glass density. REDOX results will be provided for all four pour stream samples ...
Date: January 20, 2012
Creator: Johnson, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ANALYSIS OF DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8) POUR STREAM SAMPLES

Description: The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), also referred to as Macrobatch 8 (MB8), in June 2011. SB7a is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the SB7a material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7a was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Three pour stream glass samples and two Melter Feed Tank (MFT) slurry samples were collected while processing SB7a. These additional samples were taken during SB7a to understand the impact of antifoam and the melter bubblers on glass redox chemistry. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they were analyzed. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The sum of oxides for the official SB7a pour stream glass is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) limits (95-105 wt%). (2) The average calculated Waste Dilution Factor (WDF) for SB7a is 2.3. In general, the measured radionuclide content of the official SB7a pour stream glass is in good agreement with the calculated values from the Tank 40 dried sludge results from the SB7a Waste Acceptance Program Specification (WAPS) sample. (3) As in previous pour stream samples, ruthenium and rhodium inclusions were detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy-Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) in the official SB7a pour stream sample. (4) The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results indicate that the official SB7a pour stream glass meets the waste acceptance criteria ...
Date: May 1, 2012
Creator: Johnson, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis Of DWPF Sludge Batch 7a (Macrobatch 8) Pour Stream Samples

Description: The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), also referred to as Macrobatch 8 (MB8), in June 2011. SB7a is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the SB7a material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7a was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Three pour stream glass samples and two Melter Feed Tank (MFT) slurry samples were collected while processing SB7a. These additional samples were taken during SB7a to understand the impact of antifoam and the melter bubblers on glass redox chemistry. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they were analyzed.
Date: October 24, 2012
Creator: Johnson, F. C. & Pareizs, J. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

INCORPORATION OF MONO SODIUM TITANATE AND CRYSTALLINE SILICOTITANATE FEEDS IN HIGH LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE GLASS

Description: Four series of glass compositions were selected, fabricated, and characterized as part of a study to determine the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. All of the glasses studied were considerably more durable than the benchmark Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. The measured Product Consistency Test (PCT) responses were compared with the predicted values from the current DWPF durability model. One of the KT01-series and two of the KT03-series glasses had measured PCT responses that were outside the lower bound of the durability model. All of the KT04 glasses had durabilities that were predictable regardless of heat treatment or compositional view. In general, the measured viscosity values of the KT01, KT03, and KT04-series glasses are well predicted by the current DWPF viscosity model. The results of liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) measurements for the KT01-series glasses were mixed with regard to the predictability of the T{sub L} for each glass. All of the measured T{sub L} values were higher than the model predicted values, although most fell within the 95% confidence intervals. Overall, the results of this study show a reasonable ability to incorporate the anticipated SCIX streams into DWPF-type glass compositions with TiO{sub 2} concentrations of 4-5 wt % in glass.
Date: November 23, 2010
Creator: Fox, K.; Johnson, F. & Edwards, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

IMPACTS OF ANTIFOAM ADDITIONS AND ARGON BUBBLING ON DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY REDUCTION/OXIDATION

Description: During melting of HLW glass, the REDOX of the melt pool cannot be measured. Therefore, the Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe ratio in the glass poured from the melter must be related to melter feed organic and oxidant concentrations to ensure production of a high quality glass without impacting production rate (e.g., foaming) or melter life (e.g., metal formation and accumulation). A production facility such as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream process, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. That is, it is based on 'feed foward' statistical process control (SPC) rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. Use of the DWPF REDOX model has controlled the balanjce of feed reductants and oxidants in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). Once the alkali/alkaline earth salts (both reduced and oxidized) are formed during reflux in the SRAT, the REDOX can only change if (1) additional reductants or oxidants are added to the SRAT, the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), or the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) or (2) if the melt pool is bubble dwith an oxidizing gas or sparging gas that imposes a different REDOX target than the chemical balance set during reflux in the SRAT.
Date: June 5, 2012
Creator: Jantzen, C. & Johnson, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC PROPPANTS FROM GAS SHALE WELL DRILL CUTTINGS

Description: The objective of this study was to develop a method of converting drill cuttings from gas shale wells into high strength proppants via flame spheroidization and devitrification processing. Conversion of drill cuttings to spherical particles was only possible for small particle sizes (< 53 {micro}m) using a flame former after a homogenizing melting step. This size limitation is likely to be impractical for application as conventional proppants due to particle packing characteristics. In an attempt to overcome the particle size limitation, sodium and calcium were added to the drill cuttings to act as fluxes during the spheroidization process. However, the flame former remained unable to form spheres from the fluxed material at the relatively large diameters (0.5 - 2 mm) targeted for proppants. For future work, the flame former could be modified to operate at higher temperature or longer residence time in order to produce larger, spherical materials. Post spheroidization heat treatments should be investigated to tailor the final phase assemblage for high strength and sufficient chemical durability.
Date: October 2, 2013
Creator: Johnson, F. & Fox, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SLUDGE BATCH 7B GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY

Description: The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing to initiate processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b). In support of the upcoming processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frits 418 with a 6% Na{sub 2}O addition (26 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) and 702 with a 4% Na{sub 2}O addition (24 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) to process SB7b. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB7b available at the time from the Savannah River Remediation (SRR). To support qualification of SB7b, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB7b. The durability models were assessed over the expected composition range of SB7b, including potential caustic additions, combined with Frits 702 and 418 over a 32-40% waste loading (WL) range. Thirty four glasses were selected based on Frits 418 and 702 coupled with the sludge projections with an additional 4-6% Na{sub 2}O to reflect the potential caustic addition. Six of these glasses, based on average nominal sludge compositions including the appropriate caustic addition, were developed for both Frit 418 and Frit 702 at 32, 36 and 40% WL to provide coverage in the center of the anticipated SB7b glass region. All glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). To comply with the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, a total of thirty four glasses were fabricated to assess the applicability of the current DWPF PCCS durability models. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass regardless of thermal history. The NL[B] values of the SB7b variability study glasses were less than 1.99 g/L as compared to 16.695 g/L for EA. A small ...
Date: October 25, 2011
Creator: Johnson, F. & Edwards, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SUMMARY REPORT ON POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION

Description: This report summarizes a large amount of experimental work completed to identify the potential impacts of material from Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) on glass formulation at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The results show no significant issues with the predicted values of chemical durability and viscosity using the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models when the SCIX components are added to projected DWPF glass compositions. No modifications to the viscosity and durability models appear to be necessary at this time in order to incorporate the SCIX streams at DWPF. It is recommended that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) continue to verify the durability and viscosity models as the projected compositions for DWPF processing evolve. It is also recommended that the data generated thus far be reviewed and a determination be made as to how best to extend the validation ranges of the durability and viscosity models. The liquidus temperatures for the experimental glasses are also reported and discussed in this report. The results show that the measured or estimated (based on measured data) liquidus temperature values for the glasses with SCIX components added are consistently higher than those predicted by the current model. Therefore, the PCCS liquidus temperature model will need to be modified in order to incorporate the SCIX streams at DWPF. It is recommended that SRNL carry out full measurements of the liquidus temperatures for those KT-series glasses where estimates have been made. These data should then be used to support an evaluation of whether a refitting of the liquidus temperature model coefficients will be sufficient to correctly predict the liquidus temperature of glasses containing the SCIX components (particularly higher TiO{sub 2} concentrations), or whether additional modifications to the model are required. While there are prediction issues with the current liquidus temperature model, they ...
Date: April 27, 2011
Creator: Fox, K.; Edwards, T. & Johnson, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of the FY09 Enhanced DOE High Level Waste Melter Throughput Studies at SRNL

Description: High-level waste (HLW) throughput (i.e., the amount of waste processed per unit time) is a function of two critical parameters: waste loading (WL) and melt rate. For the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), increasing HLW throughput would significantly reduce the overall mission life cycle costs for the Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this task is to develop data, assess property models, and refine or develop the necessary models to support increased WL of HLW at SRS. It is a continuation of the studies initiated in FY07, but is under the specific guidance of a Task Change Request (TCR)/Work Authorization received from DOE headquarters (Project Number RV071301). Using the data generated in FY07, FY08 and historical data, two test matrices (60 glasses total) were developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in order to generate data in broader compositional regions. These glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), viscosity, liquidus temperature (TL) measurement and durability as defined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). The results of this study are summarized below: (1) In general, the current durability model predicts the durabilities of higher waste loading glasses quite well. A few of the glasses exhibited poorer durability than predicted. (2) Some of the glasses exhibited anomalous behavior with respect to durability (normalized leachate for boron (NL [B])). The quenched samples of FY09EM21-02, -07 and -21 contained no nepheline or other wasteform affecting crystals, but have unacceptable NL [B] values (> 10 g/L). The ccc sample of FY09EM21-07 has a NL [B] value that is more than one half the value of the quenched sample. These glasses also have lower concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub ...
Date: June 23, 2010
Creator: Johnson, F. & Edwards, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SLUDGE BATCH VARIABILITY STUDY WITH FRIT 418

Description: The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) initiated processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) in the summer of 2010. In support of processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frit 418 to process SB6. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB6 available at the time from the Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) and SRNL (using a model-based approach). To support qualification of SB6, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB6. The durability models were assessed over the expected Frit 418-SB6 composition range. Seventeen glasses were selected for the variability study based on the sludge projections used in the frit recommendation. Five of the glasses are based on the centroid of the compositional region, spanning a waste loading (WL) range of 32 to 40%. The remaining twelve glasses are extreme vertices (EVs) of the sludge region of interest for SB6 combined with Frit 418 and are all at 36% WL. These glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). After initiating the SB6 variability study, the measured composition of the SB6 Tank 51 qualification glass produced at the SRNL Shielded Cells Facility indicated that thorium was present in the glass at an appreciable concentration (1.03 wt%), which made it a reportable element for SB6. This concentration of ThO{sub 2} resulted in a second phase of experimental studies. Five glasses were formulated that were based on the centroid of the new sludge compositional region combined with Frit 418, spanning a WL range of 32 to 40%. These glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis and the PCT. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses (with and without thorium) were acceptable with ...
Date: November 29, 2010
Creator: Johnson, F. & Edwards, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Survey of Tin in California

Description: Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines on a survey of tin deposits in California. A focus on tin deposits in Kern and San Bernardino Counties are presented. The report includes two maps.
Date: April 1946
Creator: Bedford, Robert H. & Johnson, F. T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis Of The Sludge Batch 7b (Macrobatch 9) DWPF Pour Stream Glass Sample

Description: The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9), in January 2012. SB7b is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and the SB7b material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7b was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Form Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Two pour stream glass samples were collected while processing SB7b. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where one was analyzed and the other was archived. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: The sum of oxides for the official SB7b pour stream glass is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) limits (95-105 wt%); The average calculated Waste Dilution Factor (WDF) for SB7b is 2.3. In general, the measured radionuclide content of the official SB7b pour stream glass is in good agreement with the calculated values from the Tank 40 dried sludge results from the SB7b Waste Acceptance Program Specification (WAPS) sample; As in previous pour stream samples, ruthenium and rhodium inclusions were detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy-Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) in the SB7b pour stream sample; The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results indicate that the official SB7b pour stream glass meets the waste acceptance criteria for durability with a normalized boron release of 0.8 g/L, which is an order of magnitude less than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass; The measured density of the ...
Date: November 18, 2013
Creator: Johnson, F. C.; Crawford, C. L. & Pareizs, J. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SOLIDIFICATION OF THE HANFORD LAW WASTE STREAM PRODUCED AS A RESULT OF NEAR-TANK CONTINUOUS SLUDGE LEACHING AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE RECOVERY

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), is responsible for the remediation and stabilization of the Hanford Site tank farms, including 53 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wasted waste contained in 177 underground tanks. The plan calls for all waste retrieved from the tanks to be transferred to the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The WTP will consist of three primary facilities including pretreatment facilities for Low Activity Waste (LAW) to remove aluminum, chromium and other solids and radioisotopes that are undesirable in the High Level Waste (HLW) stream. Removal of aluminum from HLW sludge can be accomplished through continuous sludge leaching of the aluminum from the HLW sludge as sodium aluminate; however, this process will introduce a significant amount of sodium hydroxide into the waste stream and consequently will increase the volume of waste to be dispositioned. A sodium recovery process is needed to remove the sodium hydroxide and recycle it back to the aluminum dissolution process. The resulting LAW waste stream has a high concentration of aluminum and sodium and will require alternative immobilization methods. Five waste forms were evaluated for immobilization of LAW at Hanford after the sodium recovery process. The waste forms considered for these two waste streams include low temperature processes (Saltstone/Cast stone and geopolymers), intermediate temperature processes (steam reforming and phosphate glasses) and high temperature processes (vitrification). These immobilization methods and the waste forms produced were evaluated for (1) compliance with the Performance Assessment (PA) requirements for disposal at the IDF, (2) waste form volume (waste loading), and (3) compatibility with the tank farms and systems. The iron phosphate glasses tested using the product consistency test had normalized release rates lower than the waste form requirements although the CCC glasses had higher release rates than the quenched glasses. However, the ...
Date: September 20, 2011
Creator: Reigel, M.; Johnson, F.; Crawford, C. & Jantzen, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a remote bushing for actinide vitrification

Description: The Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) are combining their existing experience in handling highly radioactive, special nuclear materials with commercial glass fiberization technology in order to assemble a small vitrification system for radioactive actinide solutions. The vitrification system or {open_quotes}brushing{close_quotes}, is fabricated from platinum-rhodium alloy and is based on early marble remelt fiberization technology. Advantages of this unique system include its relatively small size, reliable operation, geometrical safety (nuclear criticality), and high temperature capability. The bushing design should be capable of vitrifying a number of the actinide nuclear materials, including solutions of americium/curium, neptunium, and possibly plutonium. State of the art, mathematical and oil model studies are being combined with basic engineering evaluations to verify and improve the thermal and mechanical design concepts.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Schumacher, R.F.; Ramsey, W.G. & Johnson, F.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Heavy oil recovery using solvents and explosives

Description: Petroleum-recovery techniques are being developed for the many shallow, low-productivity, heavy-oil sand deposits in southeastern Kansas, southwestern Missouri, and northeastern Oklahoma. In 1971, laboratory flooding experiments were conducted to determine optimum field operating conditions for recovery of heavy oil. Concurrently the Research Center began a field experiment in Labette County, Kans., using a recovery method (SolFrac) that combines chemical-explosive fracturing, to create communication with solvent injection, to improve mobility. The general boundaries of heavy-oil deposits are reported, and the areal extent and general characteristics of the reservoir in Labette County are described. The fracturing, injection, and production techniques and the production results from the field experiment are described. About 14% of the solvent injected was not recovered and thus was lost to the formation. Roughly 27 percent of the oil-in-place within the five-spot interwell zone was recovered. Reinjection of the produced solvent-oil mixture was done on a limited basis. Not enough additional oil was picked up during recycling of the solvent to justify this procedure. 9 tables, 21 figures.
Date: December 1, 1977
Creator: Heath, L.J.; Johnson, F.S.; Miller, J.S.; Jones, R.A. & McMurtrie, W.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy use in Sweden: An international perspective

Description: This report analyzes the evolution of energy use in Sweden since the early 1970s. The purpose of the study, which is sponsored by NUTEK, Department of Energy Efficiency, the Swedish Agency for Technical and Industrial Development, is to shed light on the future path of energy use in Sweden by quantifying and understanding changes in past energy use. Energy efficiency has been identified by Swedish authorities in countless official studies as a key element in Sweden`s efforts to restrain oil imports, reduce reliance on nuclear power, reduce environmental impacts of energy use, and reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. To understand the role or performance of energy efficiency in the 1970s and 1980s in Sweden, and what this performance means about the future, the authors seek answers to three broad questions: (1) How has the structure and efficiency of energy use in Sweden evolved since the early 1970s, and where data permit, since even earlier? What caused these changes? (2) How does the structure of energy use in Sweden differ from that of other countries, and how has the evolution of energy use in Sweden differed from developments in other countries? (3) How much energy has Sweden saved, and why? Are these savings permanent? To what extent were they offset by changes in the structure of energy use? And to what extent is the magnitude of these savings dependent upon the way we measure energy use? The report reviews the long-term evolution of Swedish energy use, focusing on developments in five sectors of the economy: residential, service, industrial (manufacturing and {open_quotes}other industry{close_quotes} defined as mining, agriculture, forestry and fisheries, and construction), travel, and freight. The authors then examine Swedish energy use in a broader perspective, drawing detailed comparisons to other nations. Finally, they discuss a series of issues that hover over the ...
Date: December 1, 1993
Creator: Schipper, L.; Johnson, F.; Howarth, R.; Price, L.; Andersson, B. & Andersson, B. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Buildings sector demand-side efficiency technology summaries

Description: This report provides descriptions of the following energy efficiency technologies: energy management systems; electronic fluorescent ballasts; compact fluorescent lamps; lighting controls; room air conditioners; high albedo materials, coatings and paints; solar domestic water heaters; heat pump water heaters; energy-efficient motors; adjustable-speed drives; energy-efficient refrigerators; daylight control glazing; insulating glazing; solar control glazing; switchable glazing; tree planting; and advanced insulation. For each technology, the report provides a description of performance characteristics, consumer utility, development status, technology standards, equipment cost, installation, maintenance, conservation programs, and environmental impacts.
Date: March 1, 1994
Creator: Koomey, J. G.; Johnson, F. X. & Schuman, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Resource appraisal of the Mt. Shasta Wilderness Study area, Siskiyou County, California

Description: Results of geological, geochemical, and aeromagnetic surveys indicate that the only potentially extractable resource of Mt. Shasta may be geothermal energy, but the potential within the Wilderness Study Area is low. Some sulfur and gypsum occur locally around active and extinct fumaroles near the summit but are too small to indicate a resource. Cinder deposits have been mined near the Wilderness Study Area, but almost none are exposed within it. The levels of trace-metal anomalies relative to background values and the amounts of exposed mineralized rock are too small to indicate economic potential. It is concluded that any significant potential for future geothermal development is more likely to exist on and near the lower slopes of the volcano, generally outside the study area. (JGB)
Date: January 1, 1977
Creator: Christiansen, R.L.; Kleinhampl, F.J.; Blakely, R.J.; Tuchek, E.T.; Johnson, F.L. & Conyac, M.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Operational history of Fermilab's 1500 W refrigerator used for energy saver magnet production testing

Description: The 1500 W helium refrigerator system utilizes two oil-injected screw compressors staged to feed a liquid nitrogen pre-cooled cold box. Refrigeration is provided by two Sulzer TGL-22 magnetic/gas bearing turbines. The refrigerator feeds six magnet test stands via a 10,000 L dewar and subcooler equipped distribution box. The design of the controls has permitted the system to be routinely operated 24 hours/day, seven days/week with only five operators. It has operated approximately 90% of the 4-1/2 years prior to shutting down in 1984 for a period of one year to move the compressor skid. Scheduled maintenance, failures, repairs and holidays are about equal to the 10% off time. The equipment described was used to test approximately 1200 superconducting magnets for the Fermilab accelerator ring. The seven year operating experience is presented as an equipment and technique review. Compressor hours currently exceed 42,000 and turbine hours exceed 39,000 each. Failure rates, causes, preventive maintenance, monitoring practices and equipment, and modifications are examined along with notes on some of the more successful applications of technique and equipment. 4 refs.
Date: September 1, 1985
Creator: Bianchi, A.J.; Barger, R.K.; Johnson, F.B.; McGuire, K.J.; Pinyan, K.D.; Wilson, F.W. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department