25 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Methods to reduce CO{sub 2} release to the atmosphere.

Description: The U.S. anthropogenic emission of CO{sub 2} is over 5.5 billion tons a year. Over 1/3 of it is emitted by power plants, and 90% of all power plant emissions is released by coal fired units. Figure 1 shows the amount of coal used and the amount of electricity generated from coal over a several year period. Burning one lb of coal produces about 2.1 lbs of CO{sub 2} and about 1 kWh of electricity, or a 1000 MW coal-fired plant emits over 1000 tons of CO{sub 2} per hour. Therefore, power plants are good candidates for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. Emissions can be reduced by conserving energy, fuel and oxidant treatment prior to combustion, using fuels with higher H/C ratios, and by capturing the CO{sub 2}.
Date: April 10, 1998
Creator: Jody, B. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery of flexible polyurethane foam from shredder residue.

Description: Argonne National Laboratory has developed a patented, continuous process for the recovery of flexible polyurethane foam (PUF) from auto shredder residue (ASR). To test the process, Argonne researchers conceived of, designed, and built a continuous foam washing and drying system that was pilot-tested at a shredder facility for six months. Economic analysis of the process, using manufacturers' quotes and operating data from Argonne's pilot plant, indicates a payback of less than two years for a plant producing about 1,000 ton/yr of foam. Samples of clean foam were shipped to three major foam reprocessors; all three indicated that the quality of the PUF recovered by the Argonne process met their requirements. Tests of the recovered foam by an independent testing laboratory showed that the recycled foam met the specifications for several automotive applications, including carpet padding, headliner, and sound-suppression support materials. Recovery of foam reduces the mass and the volume of material going to the landfill by about 5% and 30%, respectively. Annually, recovery will save about 1.2 x 10{sup 12} Btu of energy, cut the amount of solid waste being landfilled by about 150,000 tons, and eliminate the emission of about 250 tons of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air.
Date: June 29, 1999
Creator: Daniels, E. J. & Jody, b. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Applications of fusion thermal energy to industrial processes

Description: The feasibility of applying fusion thermal energy as process heat in the iron-steel industry, petrochemical industry, cement industry, and in the production of acetylene fom coal via calcium carbide are discussed. These four industries were selected for analysis because they require massive amounts of energy. This preliminary study concludes that the production of synthetic fuels using fusion heat appears to be the most promising method of storing and transporting this heat. Of the four industries studied, the iron-steel and the petrochemical industries appear to be the most promising because they consume substantial amounts of hydrogen and oxygen as feedstocks. These can be produced from water using the high-temperature fusion heat. The production of hydrogen and oxygen using fusion heat will also reduce the capital investment required for these industries. These two industries also consume tremendous amounts of heat at temperatures which can be delivered from a fusion blanket via chemical heat pipes.
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Bowman, R.M.; Jody, B.J. & Lu, K.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Progress in recycling of automobile shredder residue

Description: At Argonne National Laboratory, we have been developing a potentially economical process to recycle automobile shredder residue (ASR). We identified three potentially marketable materials that can be recovered from ASR and developed technologies to recover and upgrade these materials. We build and tested a field-demonstration plant for recycling polyurethane foam and produced about 2000 lb of recycled foam. Several 300-lb samples were sent for evaluation and were found to be of marketable quality. We are also preparing for a large-scale test in which about 200 tons of ASR-derived fines will be used as a raw material in cement making. A major cement company has evaluated small samples of fines prepared in the laboratory and found that they meet its requirements as a substitute for iron ore or mill scale. We also produced about 50 lb of recycled acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) from obsolete automobiles and found that it has properties that could be readily upgraded to meet the specifications of the automotive industry. In this paper, we briefly discuss the process as a whole and summarize the results obtained from the field work on foam and fines recycling.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J. & Pomykala, J.A. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrating O{sub 2} production with power systems to capture CO{sub 2}

Description: Chemical cycles for separating oxygen (O{sub 2}) from air were developed many years ago. These cycles involve initiating a reaction to capture O{sub 2} from the air and changing the operating conditions to effect a controlled breakdown of the newly formed product to release the O{sub 2} and regenerate the original species. Two such O{sub 2} separation cycles are the Moltox{trademark} and the barium oxide/peroxide cycles. These cycles are generally more expensive than more conventional methods--such as cryogenic separation of air--partly because they consume high-temperature thermal energy (500--850 C). Conventional air separation to produce O{sub 2}, though more economical than these cycles, is still too expensive when applied to combustion of fossil fuels. The nitrogen content of the combustion air results in a flue gas stream that is low in carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}); this increases the complexity and cost of capturing the CO{sub 2} from the flue gas. These chemical cycles can be integrated with power cycles, such as the high-temperature gas turbine (1,300--1,500 C), to provide efficient heat cascading and recovery. The heat cascading process can also be arranged to minimize the overall exergy loss in the integrated system. The enriched O{sub 2} stream produced can be used in the combustion process to generate a CO{sub 2}-rich stream that is more readily separable for production of commercial-grade CO{sub 2}. This paper presents a discussion of air and water separation techniques integrated with power cycles.
Date: November 1, 1996
Creator: Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J. & Wolsky, A.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Materials recovery from shredder residues

Description: Each year, about five (5) million ton of shredder residues are landfilled in the US. Similar quantities are landfilled in Europe and the Pacific Rim. Landfilling of these residues results in a cost to the existing recycling industry and also represents a loss of material resources that are otherwise recyclable. In this paper, the authors outline the resources recoverable from typical shredder residues and describe technology that they have developed to recover these resources.
Date: July 24, 2000
Creator: Daniels, E. J.; Jody, B. J. & Pomykala, J., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal decomposition of PMC for fiber recovery

Description: This paper describes efforts by Argonne National Laboratory to develop a process to recover carbon fibers from polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials. The polymer material in the matrix maybe a thermoplastic or a thermoset. Samples of panels containing PMC fibers were obtained and used in the bench-scale testing program. The authors tested three different methods for recovering these PMC fibers: thermal treatment, chemical degradation, and cryogenic methods (thermal shock treatment). The first two methods were effective in separating the carbon fibers from the polymeric substrate; the third method was not satisfactory. Carbon fibers separated from the polymer substrate using the thermal treatment method were submitted to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for analysis and evaluation. The results indicated that the carbon fibers had been cleanly separated from the polymer matrix. Their intrinsic density was 1.8473 g/cm{sup 3} and their electrical resistivity was 0.001847 ohm-cm, compared to an intrinsic density of 1.75--1.9 gm/cm{sup 3} and an electrical resistivity of 0.0002--0.002 ohm-cm for virgin fibers produced from polyacrylonitrile (PAN). Although they were not sure that the samples they processed were originally produced from PAN, they used the PAN fibers for comparison. It was also demonstrated that the surface of the recovered fibers could be reactivated to energy levels equivalent to those of reactivated virgin fibers from PAN. A comparison of the mechanical properties of the recovered fibers (without surface treatment) with those of surface-treated virgin fibers from PAN revealed that the ultimate tensile strength and the elongation at brake values are about 1/3 the values for the virgin fibers. The modulus for the recycled fibers (31.4 million pounds per square inch [psi]) was about the same as that for the virgin PAN fibers (31.2 million psi). The reason for the lower tensile strength and elongation is not clear; the authors plan to investigate ...
Date: October 22, 1999
Creator: Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J. & Pomykala, J. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Separation and recovery of thermoplastics by froth floatation

Description: This paper describes efforts by Argonne National Laboratory to develop a froth flotation process for separating and recovering plastics from mixed plastics waste streams generated from shredding obsolete appliances and automobiles. A process for recovering and separating equivalent-density ABS and HIPS from obsolete appliances was developed and pilot-tested with a through-put of 1,250 lbs/hr. The basic process is outlined; unit operations and equipment are discussed, and material balances are presented. The resulting ABS product was analyzed and its physical and mechanical properties were established. Its properties resembled those of virgin, mid-grade ABS that is commercially sold today and is widely used by the automotive industry. Injection-molding tests were also conducted by automotive-components suppliers, using the 100% recovered ABS. Headlamp back-cans and automotive ventilation-system duct components were injection molded and the results showed that the recovered ABS met the specifications for these applications. These results confirmed that the recovered ABS can be used as a substitute for virgin plastic materials for molding highly complex automotive component designs, and in parts for other durable goods. Economic analysis of a commercial-scale system was also performed using manufacturers' equipment quotes and operating data from the pilot plant, and it predicts a simple payback of less than 2 years for plants producing about 850 tons per year of ABS.
Date: October 22, 1999
Creator: Karvelas, D. E.; Jody, B. J.; Pomykala, J., Jr. & Daniels, E. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The interactive effects of pH, surface tension, and solution density for flotation systems for separation of equivalent-density materials: separation of ABS from HIPS

Description: This paper presents the results of research being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory, to develop a cost-effective and environmentally acceptable process for the separation of high-value plastics from discarded household appliances. The process under development has separated high-purity (greater than 99.5%) acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and high-impact polystyrene (HIPS) from commingled plastics generated by appliance-shredding and metal recovery operations. Plastics of similar densities, such as ABS and HIPS are further separated by using a chemical solution. By controlling the surface tension, the density and the temperature of the chemical solution, we are able to selectively float/separate plastics that have equivalent densities. In laboratory-scale tests, this technique has proven highly effective in recovering high-purity plastics materials from discarded household appliances and other obsolete durable goods. A pilot plant is under construction to demonstrate and assess the technical and economic performance of this process. In this paper, we examine the technical and economic issues that affect the recovery and separation of plastics and provide an update on Argonne`s plastics separation research and development activities.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Karvelas, D.E.; Jody, B.J.; Pomykala, J.A. & Daniels, E.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery of recyclable materials from shredder residue

Description: Each year, about 11 million tons of metals (ferrous and nonferrous) are recovered in the US from about 10 million discarded automobiles. The recovered metals account for about 75% of the total weight of the discarded vehicles. The balance of the material or shredder residue, which amounts to about 3 million tons annually, is currently landfilled. The residue contains a diversity of potentially recyclable materials, including polyurethane foams, iron oxides, and certain thermoplastics. This paper discusses a process under development at Argonne National Laboratory to separate and recover the recyclable materials from this waste stream. The process consists essentially of two-stages. First, a physical separation is used to recover the foams and the metal oxides, followed by a chemical process to extract certain thermoplastics. Status of the technology is discussed and process economics reviewed.
Date: January 1, 1994
Creator: Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Bonsignore, P.V. & Brockmeier, N.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Treatment and recycling of shredder fluff: Final report on Phase 1, Proof of concept

Description: This report describes the results of a study conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to investigate the feasibility of extracting thermoplastics from shredder fluff for possible recycling. The objective of the research was to evaluate the technical feasibility of using organic solvents to selectively dissolve and recover thermoplastics from the shredder fluff. The basis of the process is physical separation of shredder fluff, which is followed by selective dissolution and recovery of thermoplastics from the plastics-rich stream. In small-scale laboratory runs, four potentially marketable products were recovered by the use of this process: clean polyurethane from (PUF), a mixture of polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE), a mixture of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS), and an iron-rich fine magnetic fraction. Because the residual shredder fluff has been preprocessed, it should be more homogeneous and have a much lower chlorine concentration and moisture content than the raw shredder fluff. These attributes should make the material more economically and environmentally attractive than raw shredder fluff as a fuel or feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals. A preliminary capital cost estimate of the process was also developed.
Date: February 1, 1992
Creator: Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J. & Bonsignore, P.V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Treatment and recycling of shredder fluff: Final report on Phase 1, Proof of concept

Description: This report describes the results of a study conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to investigate the feasibility of extracting thermoplastics from shredder fluff for possible recycling. The objective of the research was to evaluate the technical feasibility of using organic solvents to selectively dissolve and recover thermoplastics from the shredder fluff. The basis of the process is physical separation of shredder fluff, which is followed by selective dissolution and recovery of thermoplastics from the plastics-rich stream. In small-scale laboratory runs, four potentially marketable products were recovered by the use of this process: clean polyurethane from (PUF), a mixture of polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE), a mixture of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS), and an iron-rich fine magnetic fraction. Because the residual shredder fluff has been preprocessed, it should be more homogeneous and have a much lower chlorine concentration and moisture content than the raw shredder fluff. These attributes should make the material more economically and environmentally attractive than raw shredder fluff as a fuel or feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals. A preliminary capital cost estimate of the process was also developed.
Date: February 1, 1992
Creator: Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J. & Bonsignore, P. V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

White goods recycling in the United States: Economic and technical issues in recovering, reclaiming, and reusing nonmetallic materials

Description: Obsolete white goods (appliances such as refrigerators, freezers, washers, dryers, ranges, dishwashers, water heaters, dehumidifiers, and air conditioners) contain significant quantities of recyclable materials, but because of economic and environmental concerns, only limited quantities of these scrap materials are currently being recycled. Appliances are manufactured from a mix of materials, such as metals, polymers, foam, and fiberglass; metals represent more than 75% of the total weight. Appliance recycling is driven primarily by the value of the steel in the appliances. Over the last 15 years, however, the use of polymers in appliance manufacturing has increased substantially at the expense of metals. The shift in the materials composition of appliances may threaten the economics of the use of obsolete appliances as a source for scrap metals. To increase the recycling of white goods, cost-effective and environmentally acceptable technologies must be developed to separate, recover, reclaim, and reuse polymers from discarded appliances. Argonne National Laboratory is currently conducting research, with industry support, to develop cost-effective processes and methods for recovering and reclaiming acrylonitrile butadiene-styrene and High-density polystyrene from discarded appliances. This collaborative research focuses on developing a combination of mechanical/physical and chemical separation methods for recovering and reusing these high-value plastics. In addition, cost-effective methods for improving the performance characteristics of the recovered plastics are being investigated with the goal of recycling these plastics to their original application. In this paper, we examine the technical and economic issues that affect the recycling of white goods and present results of Argonne`s white goods recycling research and development activities.
Date: February 1, 1995
Creator: Karvelas, D. E.; Jody, B. J. & Daniels, E. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recycling of Aluminum Salt Cake

Description: The secondary aluminum industry generates more than 110 {times} 10{sup 3} tons of salt-cake waste every year. This waste stream contains about 3--5% aluminum, 15--30% aluminum oxide, 30--40% sodium chloride, and 20--30% potassium chloride. As much as 50% of the content of this waste is combined salt (sodium and potassium chlorides). Salt-cake waste is currently disposed of in conventional landfills. In addition, over 50 {times} 10{sup 3} tons of black dross that is not economical to reprocess a rotary furnace for aluminum recovery ends up in landfills. The composition of the dross is similar to that of salt cake, except that it contains higher concentrations of aluminum (up to 20%) and correspondingly lower amounts of salts. Because of the high solubility of the salts in water, these residues, when put in landfills, represent a potential source of pollution to surface-water and groundwater supplies. The increasing number of environmental regulations on the generation and disposal of industrial wastes are likely to restrict the disposal of these salt-containing wastes in conventional landfills. Processes exist that employ the dissolution and recovery of the salts from the waste stream. These wet-processing methods are economical only when the aluminum concentration in that waste exceeds about 10%. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a study in which existing technologies were reviewed and new concepts that are potentially more cost-effective than existing processes were developed and evaluated. These include freeze crystallization, solvent/antisolvent extraction, common-ion effect, high-pressure/high-temperature process, and capillary-effect systems. This paper presents some of the technical and economic results of the aforementioned ANL study.
Date: December 1991
Creator: Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Bonsignore, P. V. & Karvelas, D. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recycling of aluminum salt cake

Description: The secondary aluminum industry generates more than 110 {times} 10{sup 3} tons of salt-cake waste every year. This waste stream contains about 3--5% aluminum, 15--30% aluminum oxide, 30--40% sodium chloride, and 20--30% potassium chloride. As much as 50% of the content of this waste is combined salt (sodium and potassium chlorides). Salt-cake waste is currently disposed of in conventional landfills. In addition, over 50 {times} 10{sup 3} tons of black dross that is not economical to reprocess a rotary furnace for aluminum recovery ends up in landfills. The composition of the dross is similar to that of salt cake, except that it contains higher concentrations of aluminum (up to 20%) and correspondingly lower amounts of salts. Because of the high solubility of the salts in water, these residues, when put in landfills, represent a potential source of pollution to surface-water and groundwater supplies. The increasing number of environmental regulations on the generation and disposal of industrial wastes are likely to restrict the disposal of these salt-containing wastes in conventional landfills. Processes exist that employ the dissolution and recovery of the salts from the waste stream. These wet-processing methods are economical only when the aluminum concentration in that waste exceeds about 10%. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a study in which existing technologies were reviewed and new concepts that are potentially more cost-effective than existing processes were developed and evaluated. These include freeze crystallization, solvent/antisolvent extraction, common-ion effect, high-pressure/high-temperature process, and capillary-effect systems. This paper presents some of the technical and economic results of the aforementioned ANL study.
Date: December 1, 1991
Creator: Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Bonsignore, P. V. & Karvelas, D. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chemical and mechanical recycling of shredder fluff

Description: Each year, the secondary metals industry recovers about 55--60 million tons of prompt and obsolete scrap which is used in the production of finished steel products. The single largest source of this scrap is the obsolete automobile. The shredder industry recovers about 10--12 million ton/yr of ferrous scrap, most of which is from shredded automobiles. However, for each ton of steel recovered, over 500 lb of fluff are produced. Shredder fluff is comprised of the nonmetallic content of the automobile and other shredded materials, such as refrigerators, dryers, and dishwashers, which are commonly called white goods. The plastics content of shredder fluff is typically about 15--20% by weight and is expected to increase over the next decade due to the significant increase in the use of automotive plastics over the past 10--15 years. At present, shredder fluff is landfilled. The rapidly escalating landfilling cost, along with environmental concerns over the fate of this waste, poses a significant cost and liability to the shredder industry. Research is being carried out to identify and develop recycling technologies that will reduce the volume and the mass of shredder fluff going to landfills and to minimize its cost impact on the recycling of secondary metals. Previous research has focused on exploiting the plastics content of shredder fluff and other hydrocarbons present in fluff for secondary recycling (e.g., production of wood-products substitutes) and for quaternary recycling (e.g., energy generation). Limited work was also conducted on tertiary recycling (e.g., pyrolysis and gasification). Although the previous research has established the technical feasibility of most, if not all, of the alternatives that were examined, none have proven to be cost-effective. This paper describes some research at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to develop a process to recycle some of the fluff content, primarily the thermoplastics.
Date: December 1, 1992
Creator: Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Bonsignore, P. V. & Shoemaker, E. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

End-of-life vehicle recycling : state of the art of resource recovery from shredder residue.

Description: Each year, more than 50 million vehicles reach the end of their service life throughout the world. More than 95% of these vehicles enter a comprehensive recycling infrastructure that includes auto parts recyclers/dismantlers, remanufacturers, and material recyclers (shredders). Today, about 75% of automotive materials are profitably recycled via (1) parts reuse and parts and components remanufacturing and (2) ultimately by the scrap processing (shredding) industry. The process by which the scrap processors recover metal scrap from automobiles involves shredding the obsolete automobiles, along with other obsolete metal-containing products (such as white goods, industrial scrap, and demolition debris), and recovering the metals from the shredded material. The single largest source of recycled ferrous scrap for the iron and steel industry is obsolete automobiles. The non-metallic fraction that remains after the metals are recovered from the shredded materials (about 25% of the weight of the vehicle)--commonly called shredder residue--is disposed of in landfills. Over the past 10 to 15 years, a significant amount of research and development has been undertaken to enhance the recycle rate of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs), including enhancing dismantling techniques and improving remanufacturing operations. However, most of the effort has focused on developing technology to recover materials, such as polymers, from shredder residue. To make future vehicles more energy efficient, more lighter-weight materials--primarily polymers and polymer composites--will be used in manufacturing these vehicles. These materials increase the percentage of shredder residue that must be disposed of, compared with the percentage of metals. Therefore, as the complexity of automotive materials and systems increases, new technologies will be required to sustain and maximize the ultimate recycling of these materials and systems at end-of-life. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), in cooperation with the Vehicle Recycling Partnership (VRP) and the American Plastics Council (APC), is working to develop technology for recycling materials from shredder ...
Date: March 21, 2007
Creator: Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J. & Systems, Energy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery and separation of high-value plastics from discarded household appliances

Description: Argonne National Laboratory is conducting research to develop a cost- effective and environmentally acceptable process for the separation of high-value plastics from discarded household appliances. The process under development has separated individual high purity (greater than 99.5%) acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and high- impact polystyrene (HIPS) from commingled plastics generated by appliance-shredding and metal-recovery operations. The process consists of size-reduction steps for the commingled plastics, followed by a series of gravity-separation techniques to separate plastic materials of different densities. Individual plastics of similar densities, such as ABS and HIPS, are further separated by using a chemical solution. By controlling the surface tension, the density, and the temperature of the chemical solution we are able to selectively float/separate plastics that have different surface energies. This separation technique has proven to be highly effective in recovering high-purity plastics materials from discarded household appliances. A conceptual design of a continuous process to recover high-value plastics from discarded appliances is also discussed. In addition to plastics separation research, Argonne National Laboratory is conducting research to develop cost-effective techniques for improving the mechanical properties of plastics recovered from appliances.
Date: March 1996
Creator: Karvelas, D. E.; Jody, B. J.; Poykala, J. A., Jr.; Daniels, E. J. & Arman, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Automobile shredder residue: Process developments for recovery of recyclable constituents

Description: The objectives of this paper are threefold: (1) to briefly outline the structure of the automobile shredder industry as a supplier of ferrous scrap, (2) to review the previous research that has been conducted for recycling automobile shredder residue (ASR), and (3) to present the results and implications of the research being conducted at ANL on the development of a process for the selective recovery and recycling of the thermoplastics content of ASR. 15 refs., 5 figs.
Date: January 1, 1990
Creator: Daniels, E.J.; Jody, B.J.; Bonsignore, P.V. & Shoemaker, E.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A desiccant/steam-injected gas-turbine industrial cogeneration system

Description: An integrated desiccant/steam-injected gas-turbine system was evaluated as an industrial cogenerator for the production of electricity and dry, heated air for product drying applications. The desiccant can be regenerated using the heated, compressed air leaving the compressor. The wet stream leaves the regenerator at a lower temperature than when it entered the desiccant regenerator, but with little loss of energy. The wet stream returns to the combustion chamber of the gas-turbine system after preheating by exchanging heat with the turbine exhaust strewn. Therefore, the desiccant is regenerated virtually energy-free. In the proposed system, the moisture-laden air exiting the desiccant is introduced into the combustion chamber of the gas-turbine power system. This paper discusses various possible design configurations, the impact of increased moisture content on the combustion process, the pressure drop across the desiccant regenerator, and the impact of these factors on the overall performance of the integrated system. A preliminary economic analysis including estimated potential energy savings when the system is used in several drying applications, and equipment and operating costs are also presented.
Date: January 1, 1993
Creator: Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Karvelas, D.E. & Teotia, A.P.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cryogenic separation of CO{sub 2} from the fluegas of conventional coal-fired power plants

Description: The reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions to the atmosphere is under study because such emissions are believed to contribute to undesired global warming via the greenhouse effect. Several conceptual processes for the capture of CO{sub 2} from power-plant flue gas are listed, with an emphasis on refrigeration and compression as a promising process to compete with amine absorption. At conditions that are industrially achievable (temperature of 170 K and pressure of 5 bar), CO{sub 2} forms a nearly pure solid on cooling from an impure mixed vapor. This study relies on this freezing and purification process to remove 90% or more of the CO{sub 2} from flue gas. Thermal and mechanical integration are used in the conceptual flow sheet to achieve better efficiency. A computerized process simulator, Aspen Plus with Model Manager{reg_sign}, is used to rigorously calculate the material and energy balances for the conceptual process. Key parameters are regressed from the component physical properties of the flue gas and used by the computer in the Peng-Robinson equation of state to quantify the required phase changes of CO{sub 2} solid between vapor and liquid states. Results of process evaluation are given over a range of operating conditions: pressures from 2 to 25 bar and temperatures from 150 to 220 K. This CO{sub 2} separation is shown to be technically feasible by using relatively simple and compact heat-exchange and compression equipment, with an energy requirement of 0.54 kWh/kg CO{sub 2}, even without optimization. For comparison, the energy used by state-of-the-art amine absorption is 0.43 kWh/kg. In spite of the 25% higher energy requirement for a cryogenic separation plant, the expectation is that it should have a 4% lower cost per tonne of avoided CO{sub 2} because it is estimated to require a much lower capital investment than amine absorption.
Date: February 1, 1995
Creator: Brockmeier, N. F.; Jody, B. J.; Wolsky, A. M. & Daniels, E. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A desiccant/steam-injected gas-turbine industrial cogeneration system

Description: An integrated desiccant/steam-injected gas-turbine system was evaluated as an industrial cogenerator for the production of electricity and dry, heated air for product drying applications. The desiccant can be regenerated using the heated, compressed air leaving the compressor. The wet stream leaves the regenerator at a lower temperature than when it entered the desiccant regenerator, but with little loss of energy. The wet stream returns to the combustion chamber of the gas-turbine system after preheating by exchanging heat with the turbine exhaust strewn. Therefore, the desiccant is regenerated virtually energy-free. In the proposed system, the moisture-laden air exiting the desiccant is introduced into the combustion chamber of the gas-turbine power system. This paper discusses various possible design configurations, the impact of increased moisture content on the combustion process, the pressure drop across the desiccant regenerator, and the impact of these factors on the overall performance of the integrated system. A preliminary economic analysis including estimated potential energy savings when the system is used in several drying applications, and equipment and operating costs are also presented.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Karvelas, D. E. & Teotia, A. P. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

End-of-life vehicle recycling : state of the art of resource recovery from shredder residue.

Description: Each year, more than 25 million vehicles reach the end of their service life throughout the world, and this number is rising rapidly because the number of vehicles on the roads is rapidly increasing. In the United States, more than 95% of the 10-15 million scrapped vehicles annually enter a comprehensive recycling infrastructure that includes auto parts recyclers/dismantlers, remanufacturers, and material recyclers (shredders). Today, over 75% of automotive materials, primarily the metals, are profitably recycled via (1) parts reuse and parts and components remanufacturing and (2) ultimately by the scrap processing (shredding) industry. The process by which the scrap processors recover metal scrap from automobiles involves shredding the obsolete automobile hulks, along with other obsolete metal-containing products (such as white goods, industrial scrap, and demolition debris), and recovering the metals from the shredded material. The single largest source of recycled ferrous scrap for the iron and steel industry is obsolete automobiles. The non-metallic fraction that remains after the metals are recovered from the shredded materials - commonly called shredder residue - constitutes about 25% of the weight of the vehicle, and it is disposed of in landfills. This practice is not environmentally friendly, wastes valuable resources, and may become uneconomical. Therefore, it is not sustainable. Over the past 15-20 years, a significant amount of research and development has been undertaken to enhance the recycle rate of end-of-life vehicles, including enhancing dismantling techniques and improving remanufacturing operations. However, most of the effort has been focused on developing technology to separate and recover non-metallic materials, such as polymers, from shredder residue. To make future vehicles more energy efficient, more lightweighting materials - primarily polymers, polymer composites, high-strength steels, and aluminum - will be used in manufacturing these vehicles. Many of these materials increase the percentage of shredder residue that must be disposed ...
Date: February 22, 2011
Creator: Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Duranceau, C. M.; Pomykala, J. A. & Spangenberger, J. S. (Energy Systems)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department