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Improved heat transfer from radioactive waste canisters

Description: From joint meeting of the American Nuclear Society and the Atomic lndustrial Forum and Nuclear Energy Exhibition; San Francisco, California, USA (11 Nov 1973). Since the radioisotope content that can be tolerated in a canister full of radioactive waste is limited by the amount of heat which can be dissipated from the waste to the surroundings, the heat transfer characteristics of a simple cylindrical canister containing only nonmetallic radioactive wastes were compared with canisters having the following design or content modifications: annular canisters; internally finned canisters; canisters with multiple cooling ports; intimately mixed metal-waste composites; and alternate layers of metal and heat-generating ceramic wastes. The cost of fabricating, filling, and handling cylindrical, annular, and internally finned containers was compared. It was concluded that each modification would contribute to improved heat transfer from the waste to the surroundings and that annular and finned containers capable of containing large waste quantities would have a cost advantage over simple cylindrical containers, but that this cost advantage would be offset by an increase in operating costs for filling, shipping, and maintaining the integrity of the larger containers. (LCL)
Date: April 30, 1974
Creator: Jansen, G. & Kaser, J.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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PUREX PULSE COLUMN STUDIES-1960

Description: A series of pilot plant runs was conducted to define new cartridges for increasing the capacity in the Purex 1 Bx, 2A, lC and 2E columns and eliminate plastic cartridge failures in the HA column scrub section, the HS column and the 2A column. The most favorable designs are presented and data from the various runs are included. (J.R.D.)
Date: February 22, 1961
Creator: Jansen, G. & Richardson, G.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Incentives for partitioning high-level waste

Description: The incentives for separating and eliminating various elements (but particularly the transuranics) from radioactive waste prior to final geologic storage were investigated. Exposure pathways to man were defined, and potential radiation doses to an individual living within the region of influence of the underground storage site were calculated. The accumulated high-level waste (i.e., the fission product waste produced by reprocessing spent fuel) from the U. S. nuclear power economy through the Year 2000 was the assumed radionuclide source, and western U. S. desert subsoil was the assumed geologic medium. The results of the study showed that for reasonable storage conditions the potential incremental radiation doses would be of the same order as, or less than, doses from natural sources. It was therefore concluded that for the situations investigated the incentives for special effort to remove any elements, including the transuranics, from high-level waste are vanishingly small. The study results also showed that incentives exist for converting high-level calcine into glass. (auth)
Date: November 1, 1975
Creator: Burkholder, H. C.; Cloninger, M. O.; Baker, D. A. & Jansen, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Global modeling of Hanford tank waste pretreatment alternatives within a total cleanup system using ASPEN PLUS{trademark}

Description: The purpose of this work is to evaluate and compare radionuclide separations/processing technologies being developed or considered as Hanford tank waste pretreatment alternatives. These technologies are integrated into a total cleanup system that includes tank waste retrieval, treatment, and disposal. Current Hanford flowsheets typically include only mature, developed technologies, not new technologies. Thus, this work examines the impact/benefits of inserting new technologies into Hanford flowsheets. Waste treatment must produce disposal fractions which are less troublesome than the original material. Researchers seeking effective treatment methods may lack the tools or expertise to fully understand the implications of their approach in terms of secondary and tertiary waste streams or the extent to which a unique new process will affect upstream or downstream processes. This work has developed and demonstrated mass balance methods that clarify the effect of including individual processes in an integrated waste treatment system, such as the Hanford cleanup system. The methods provide a measure of treatment effectiveness and a format for the researcher to understand waste stream interrelationships and determine how a particular treatment technology can best be used in a cleanup system. A description of the Hanford tank waste cleanup model developed using the ASPEN PLUS flowsheet simulation tool is given. Important aspects of the modeling approach are discussed along with a description of how performance measures were developed and integrated within the simulation to evaluate and compare various Hanford tank waste pretreatment alternatives.
Date: November 1, 1994
Creator: Knutson, B. J.; Jansen, G. Jr.; Zimmerman, B. D.; Niccoli, L. G. & Lauerhass, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Extensive separations (CLEAN) processing strategy compared to TRUEX strategy and sludge wash ion exchange

Description: Numerous pretreatment flowsheets have been proposed for processing the radioactive wastes in Hanford`s 177 underground storage tanks. The CLEAN Option is examined along with two other flowsheet alternatives to quantify the trade-off of greater capital equipment and operating costs for aggressive separations with the reduced waste disposal costs and decreased environmental/health risks. The effect on the volume of HLW glass product and radiotoxicity of the LLW glass or grout product is predicted with current assumptions about waste characteristics and separations processes using a mass balance model. The prediction is made on three principal processing options: washing of tank wastes with removal of cesium and technetium from the supernatant, with washed solids routed directly to the glass (referred to as the Sludge Wash C processing strategy); the previous steps plus dissolution of the solids and removal of transuranic (TRU) elements, uranium, and strontium using solvent extraction processes (referred to as the Transuranic Extraction Option C (TRUEX-C) processing strategy); and an aggressive yet feasible processing strategy for separating the waste components to meet several main goals or objectives (referred to as the CLEAN Option processing strategy), such as the LLW is required to meet the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Class A limits; concentrations of technetium, iodine, and uranium are reduced as low as reasonably achievable; and HLW will be contained within 1,000 borosilicate glass canisters that meet current Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant glass specifications.
Date: August 1, 1994
Creator: Knutson, B. J.; Jansen, G.; Zimmerman, B. D.; Seeman, S. E.; Lauerhass, L. & Hoza, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Review of ARHCO Waste Tank Leak and Level Monitoring Systems and Material Balance Techniques

Description: A review of selected portions of the ARHCO waste tank farm monitoring methods and systems was made. Only preliminary evaluations were made as the study was carried out over a period of only ten days. The study was requested by the Operation Support Engineering Department of ARHCO and the objectives as developed were divided into four tasks. Briefly, these were: evaluation of the waste tank dry well monitoring and data processing systems; evaluation of the accuracy (and precision) of material balance calculations for transfers from one tank to another tank; evaluation of the capabilities of material balance techniques for the detection of leaks in evaporator bottoms loop systems; and evaluation of the general operability of liquid level instrument systems currently in use and alternatives to these systems. The objectives of these tasks are restated in more detail in each of the sections below. An overview of the entire Hanford radioactive waste program including a limited description of the physical equipment involved can be found in PWM-530, Hanford Radioactive Waste Management Plans. Additional efforts have been initiated to establish an overall R and D program to more fully evaluate these systems and other factors relative to the successful operation of the ARHCO tank farm system.
Date: December 31, 1973
Creator: McElroy, J. L.; Jansen, G.; Granquist, D. P.; Dierks, R. D.; Hartley, J. N.; Koski, O. H. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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